World Geography - 9th Grade
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The British have invaded 9 out of 10 countries

The British have invaded 9 out of 10 countries | World Geography - 9th Grade | Scoop.it
Britain has invaded all but 22 countries in the world in its long and colourful history, new research has found.


This is a great map to show the historical impact of colonialism on the world map.  The map is based on the work in the new book All the Countries We've Ever Invaded: And the Few We Never Got Round To.   


Tags: book reviews, colonialism, war, historical, UK. 


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:33 PM

The British have done this in reality, in the physical world, in space and time... but perhaps the Chinese have done this in our minds!  Everything our country trades for has parts made in China.  We simply can't live without these things that may be invented in the US, and designed in the US, but assembled in China.... China has a name for itself, and they're playing a game of Monopoly.  They have hotels on Board walk and Park place, and they're eating us alive... I've conferred with politicians, who say that they're on the verge of turning their hidden empire into a physical one, and going from simple monetary domination to war.  They outnumber the US, and have better technology, and evidently more skill and products.  Not much to say about that, but if they learn from the mistakes of the British, the Chinese could really create a truly elite empire that could outlast any other in human history...  But really, if they include American/Chinese cuisine in their menu, I'm sold at General Tao's chicken... Go China! 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 2014 8:36 PM

This map illustrates just how wide-reaching the British Empire was throughout its history. Though the map cheats a little by including the activities of sanctioned pirates and minor invasions, almost the whole world excepting several very small nations and some difficult to reach inland ones.

 

The most surprising was Sweden considering the proximity and the frequent viking invasions on the British isles which were apparently never reciprocated.

 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 10:26 AM

The British have had a powerful and colorful history. The British built an empire that has been unmatched in the history of human civilization. At its height, the sun never truly set on its empire. The impact the British Empire had on the globe is astounding. Almost every country in the world has some form of British heritage and influence. The influence has  had both positive and negative attributes. The British Empire spread both knowledge and Slavery to the rest of the globe. The world can never truly escape its British past.

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Inside North Korea

Go undercover with National Geographic correspondent Lisa Ling as she journeys into mysterious and reclusive North Korea.


We know so little about life in North Korea since they have the world’s least free press (that is not hyperbole--Freedom House ranks countries from 0 to 99 with 0 being the most free and 99 being the least free.  North Korea has recently "improved" its rating to 97, the worst in the world). Official coverage is highly censored and filled with government propaganda. This 2009 glimpse is incredibly poignant.


Tags: East Asia, development, states, poverty.


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The Rise of Megacities

The Rise of Megacities | World Geography - 9th Grade | Scoop.it
By 2025, the developing world will be home to 29 megacities.


Through this interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents. 


Tags: urban, megacities.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 16, 2013 12:28 PM

Through this interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents. 


Download the data yourself as a CSV file and your can import this into ArcGIS online and symbolize your map with any of the columns in the dataset.  


Tags: urban, megacities.


Peter Steffan's curator insight, October 9, 2013 5:00 PM

Very cool!

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 2015 3:36 PM

World cities and megacities - Presently , the mega cities of the world have to have a population of at least 10,000. Many cities are very near the minimum to be considered a mega city, but are not quite there. By 2025, the developing world, as we understand it now, is estimated to be home to 29 megacities.

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Global food crisis

Global food crisis | World Geography - 9th Grade | Scoop.it
Climate change, changing diets and a growing global population has pushed food security to the top of the international agenda.


Food problems are fundamentally geographic.  Understanding local economics, agriculture and development all play a critical role in contextualizing place-based shortages.  This interactive media guide highlights where these issues are the most problematic. 


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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 10, 2013 12:39 PM

Neo-Malthusian point of view?

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Special Series: 7 Billion

Special Series: 7 Billion | World Geography - 9th Grade | Scoop.it
There will soon be 7 billion people on the planet. Find out why you shouldn’t panic—at least, not yet.


This whole year, National Geographic has been producing materials on the impacts of a growing global population (including this popular and powerful video).  Now that the year has (almost) concluded, all of these resources are archived in here. These resources are designed to answers some of our Earth's most critical questions:  Are there too many people on the planet?  What influences women to have fewer children?  How will we cope with our changing climate?  Are we in 'the Age of Man?'  Can we feed the 7 billion of us? Are cities the cure for our growing pains?  What happens when our oceans become acidic?  Is there enough for everyone?


Tags: population, National Geographic, sustainability, density.


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China's 'Mountain-Moving' Project

A promotional video shows planned development of a state-level development zone by government of Lanzhou, a provincial capital in China's arid northwest...


The Lanzhou province is lightly populated mainly due to it's semi-arid climate and rugged topography.  The goal is make a 500 square mile area (currently with 100,000 people) into a city with over 1 million people by 2030.  To make this new metropolis, developers are planning to literally remove mountains to create a more 'ideal' urban environment.  This makes some of the most ambitious environmental modification projects seem tame.  For more read, the accompanying article from the Guardian.  


Questions to Ponder: What potential environmental impacts come from this scale of modification?  How will this massive influx of the population impact the region?  Could this type of project happen in other part of the world? 


Tags: environment, urban ecology, planning, environment modify, China.


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Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 11, 2012 11:51 PM
The developer is claiming this will be "protective development." I am not sure if I buy that. They are moving mountains- which means everything that comes with that, wildlife, trees, etc... And they are building an airport and an oil refinery (amongst other things).. Urbanizing can be great for the economy- but at what cost.
Elizabeth Allen's curator insight, December 11, 2012 11:51 PM

The developer is claiming this will be "protective development." I am not sure if I buy that.  They are moving mountains- which means everything that comes with that, wildlife, trees, etc...  And they are building an airport and an oil refinery (amongst other things)..  Urbanizing can be great for the economy- but at what cost.   Elizabeth Allen

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All Over the Map: 10 Ways to Teach About Geography

All Over the Map: 10 Ways to Teach About Geography | World Geography - 9th Grade | Scoop.it

From the NY TImes "We have created 10 activities for teaching about geography using Times content, all related to the National Geography Standards."  Carla Saunders originally scooped this on "History and Geography in the 21st Century Classroom."  GENIP recently released (via NCGE) the second edition of "Geography for Life"--the National Geography Standards.  Here are some interesting activities using Times articles.  I am a fan of the NY Times Learning Network--you can get great ideas here!


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Crowdsourcing an Israeli-Palestinian Border

Crowdsourcing an Israeli-Palestinian Border | World Geography - 9th Grade | Scoop.it

A new interactive tool allows you to decide how many Israeli settlers to annex and what constitutes a viable Palestinian state.

 

This article from the Atlantic is a great introduction to a mapping tool that puts the user at the virtual negotiation table.  Peace talk proposals often center around the amount of land that Palestinians want and the Jewish settlements in the West Bank that the Israelis want as a part of the state of Israel.  This interactive, titled Is Peace Possible?, allows the user to propose potential land swaps, see the demographic breakdown of West Bank settlements and videos to introduce users to on 4 major issues: borders, security, refugees and Jerusalem. 

 

Tags: Israel, borders, Palestine, territoriality, political, mapping. 


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Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | World Geography - 9th Grade | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?


This is a great intellectual expercise to help student think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   


Tags: regions, USA.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.

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Inside Mecca

For over 1400 years, Mecca has been one of the most important cities in the Arabian Peninsula. By the middle of the 6th century, there were three major settl...


As the heart of Islam, Mecca brings in pilgrims from around the world.  This documentary gives a great overview of the historical, spiritual and cultural reasons why this is sacred space to over one billion Muslims.  Additionally, this documentary contains an analysis of the logistics that are a part of the Hajj.  


Tags: Islam, tourism, place, transportation, religion, Middle East, culture. 

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Global cities of the future

Global cities of the future | World Geography - 9th Grade | Scoop.it
Explore the cities and emerging urban clusters that will drive dramatic growth and demographic changes over the next generation. A McKinsey Quarterly Economic Studies article.


In the next 13 years, 600 cities will account for nearly 65 percent of global GDP growth. That is reason enough to explore this global dataset with over 2,600 metropolitan areas. 


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Geography and the Common Core

Geography and the Common Core | World Geography - 9th Grade | Scoop.it
In 2010, most states in the United States (including Rhode Island) adopted the Common Core State Standards as the new standards.   The two main portions of the Common Core Standards are the English...


Will geography be permanently pushed out of the curriculum with the adoption of the Common Core?  How can a teacher bolster spatial thinking and geo-literacy within the Common Core framework?  If you've asked yourself these questions, this resource is for you. 


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Olga Varlamov's curator insight, November 23, 2013 8:39 PM

This article is under intellectual/arts in the United States, because it is about education. It talks about how the standards of the common core are spreading and how this will affect geography.

 

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Red Dawn remake swapped Chinese flags for North Korean ones

Red Dawn remake swapped Chinese flags for North Korean ones | World Geography - 9th Grade | Scoop.it

"When it comes to making a multimillion-dollar  action blockbuster, an important rule to follow is: do not alienate some1.3 billion potential theatergoers."
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DB: As the reaction to the YouTube “Innocence of Muslims” trailer has shown, we must be more cautious of what we say and how we depict others as social media and cinema can now easily transcend boarders diversifying the place and space of potential viewers.

 

Forms of expression or entertainment such as art, music, dance, food and especially cinema can symbolize many of the values, norms, customs or fears that are prevalent within a particular society. However, these cultural expressions also may also carry a political stigma that conveys a message to its audience.  China has played a major role in the development of the November release of MGM’s remake of the movie “Red Dawn,” which was a 1984 politically-charged Cold War film about the USSR invading America. The remake of the film incorporated many themes associated with a “declining” America, yet this was not China’s concern. Originally the producers of this film intended to replace the USSR with the PRC which would portray China as the villain and antagonist of the film. Yet (as the Chinese government soon made MGM realize) this is inconsistent with the realities of 21st century geopolitics or the globally economy. The threat of having the film blocked by one of their biggest and most lucrative markets in East Asia pressured MGM to re-edit the film depicting North Korea as the villain before its release this November.

 

Question: How has globalization changed the film or entertainment industry in general?


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 23, 2013 1:29 PM

Amazing how they had to change who the enemy was when they found out the Chinese were being offened.  I remember when the original was being made.  The Soviet Union was up in arms about it, did they change the enemy at that time, nope.  The Soviet Union was not seen as an "economic" threat to making money off the movie, the Chinese are.

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The 10 Stories You Missed in 2012

The 10 Stories You Missed in 2012 | World Geography - 9th Grade | Scoop.it
2012 has had many stories around the globe have grabbed the headlines with their shocking tales.  Some of the most important shifts in the world however are incremental processes that happen slowly...


This article from Foreign Policy shares some great global stories that may end up impacting the coming years as well:  


1) India and Pakistan start trading more

2) Brazil becomes an immigration destination

3) Inuits strike it rich

4) A tropical disease nearly eradicated

5) The copyright wars go 3-D

6) The end of the Indian call center (Philippines)

7) Hong Kong fights back

8) Moscow on the Med (Cyprus)

9) Oil discoveries in Central Africa

10) Island dispute between Iran and UAE


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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, January 4, 2013 9:57 AM

What was missed in the news?  Take a look at some of the stories from around the world!

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China will be dominant economic power by 2030, says NIC report - The Guardian

China will be dominant economic power by 2030, says NIC report - The Guardian | World Geography - 9th Grade | Scoop.it
The GuardianChina will be dominant economic power by 2030, says NIC reportThe GuardianA US intelligence portrait of the world in 2030 predicts that China will be the largest economic power, that climate change will create instability by contributing...
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