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Border Walls

Border Walls | World Geography | Scoop.it

"Geographer Reece Jones discusses his recent book Border Walls, examining the history of how and why societies have chosen to literally wall themselves apart.  He gives a brief history of political maps, how international lines reshape landscapes, and how the trend towards increased border wall construction contrasts with the view of a “borderless” world under globalization."


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Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 9:00 AM
listening to some of the podcast you can get an in-depth synopsis of this. the walls that divide our countries and even towns over time have all the criteria and/or reasoning. Great Wall of China to keep invaders from starting war, Berlin Wall to divide german supporters of war, America/Mexican boarder is to keep illegal immigrants from coming, fence in your moms backyard is to keep neighbors/animals out of yard. Walls all have the same concept of avoiding war, trespassers and privacy. this is seen in not only everyday living but in military use as well.
Amanda Morgan's comment, September 13, 2014 4:49 PM
I found this podcast to be interesting because it seems as though the more popular globalization is becoming, and the more it grows, there are more borders and walls being built. By secluding the poor communities, wealthier communities could essentially cut them off to the rest of the globe.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:52 AM

I found this podcast to be interesting because it seems as though the more popular globalization is becoming, and the more it grows, there are more borders and walls being built. By secluding the poor communities, wealthier communities could essentially cut them off to the rest of the globe.

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10 of the best hand-drawn maps – in pictures

10 of the best hand-drawn maps – in pictures | World Geography | Scoop.it
Hand-drawn maps are enjoying a renaissance as contemporary artists use their imagination, creativity and humour to breathe new life into the traditional craft of cartography.
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geteach.com

geteach.com | World Geography | Scoop.it
Free site dedicated to help teachers educate and engage students using Google Earth

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 19, 2013 2:54 PM

GE Teach is a phenomenal site, designed by an AP teacher to bring geospatial technologies into the classroom in a way that is incredibly user-friendly. This site allows you to use Google Earth with clickable layers. With multiple data layers of physical and human geography variables, this interactive globe puts spatial information in powerful, yet fun, student-inspired platform.  Click here for a video tutorial.


Tags:  google, virtual tours, geospatial, edtech.


Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, March 29, 2013 9:54 AM

Use Google Earth in the classroom with clickable layering of maps.  Great for bringing Geography into your classroom!

Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 8, 2015 5:18 AM

GTAV Technology and cartography in Geography

GE Teach is a phenomenal site, designed to bring geospatial technologies into the classroom in a way that is incredibly user-friendly. This site allows you to use Google Earth with clickable layers. With multiple data layers of physical and human geography variables, this interactive globe puts spatial information in powerful, yet fun, student-inspired platform.

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A world of projections

Welcome, Metafilter visitors! How can you map a sphere unto the plane? well you can't if you want to keep size, shape and proportions. Here are the alternatives... Learn more about the different projections.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 23, 2013 9:23 AM

We are accustomed to spatial distortion in maps; when we see that same distortion on a picture, it gives us an alternative perspective on the level of spatial distortion that we see on maps.  The Azimuthal projections (circular) are my favorite for this photographic project.   


Tagsmapping, cartography, perspective, map.

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 24, 2013 7:55 AM

Des cartes pour comprendre le monde...une initiative photographique pour comprendre les projections. 

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Japan's Geographic Challenge

Stratfor examines Japan's primary geographic challenge of sustaining its large population with little arable land and few natural resources. For more analysi...

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Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:51 AM
Unlike other larger, more geographically diverse countries, Japan is faced with the problem of a general lack of farmable land and natural resources. The fact that the country is itself an island does not make things any easier for it in an economic sense. The way the country is divided up also makes for a difficult political situation, as mountain ranges create division, and therefore, political disunity.
The proximity of the Korean peninsula and China to Japan is also important to examine. Whenever Japan wishes to acquire natural resources and other economically beneficial materials, Korea is the conduit through which Japan tends to invade the mainland, usually China. Because of this, we can see how Japan’s geographic location may cause strained relationships with its neighbors, both politically and economically. Alienating two of its closest neighbors would clearly be a disastrous move for Japan, but it may be seen as necessary due to its unfortunate geographic location.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 5:31 PM

It would make sense to me that for a place like Japan to sustain itself successfully, it would have to have some help from other areas with more resources.  Again with the concept- people don't choose to be born, or where they are born... To be born in Japan is as unchosen by that person as it would be in any other country.  I don't think people should have to pay for resources that they do not have available, especially because they are on an island/island chain that simply doesn't have what they need.  I am really repulsed by the bartering system because of absolute indication of beyond excessive surplus and profit and greed and all that garbage that humanity reeks of.  Yeah some people are happy, but we could be completely unburdened of all negativity if we banded together to rid the world of negativity itself.  I know that Japan would be happy to receive everything that they need for no cost, but I also know that many people would be willing to work, and more willing to work, if they didn't have expenses to pay for... it would really be serving their life's purpose as a component of humankind if they worked to help others, rather than to pay their monthly rent.  I don't have a clue how I would go about organizing a movement to transform this idea into a reality, but I'll work on that.  In the mean time, I would advise supranationalism for Japan, and hope that with the alliance of other countries, they can band together and make deals that work for the greater good of their country, population, and the world.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 2014 10:58 AM

This short video did a great job in explaining why Japan became expansionist in the decades leading up to WW II.  The mountainous nature of the islands and lack of arable land challenges Japan to provide food for its people.  To understand Japan you must understand her geography, this helps to understand why a country acted the way it did in the past and can be a predictor of future actions. 

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America's Most (and Least) Religious Metro Areas

America's Most (and Least) Religious Metro Areas | World Geography | Scoop.it
Provo, Utah, and Burlington, Vermont, represent opposite ends of the U.S. religiosity spectrum.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 7, 2013 11:07 AM

The majority of the most religious metros are concentrated in the South or Utah.  This particular weekend, many of the rythmns of urban life in Utah cities are remarkably visible as the LDS church holds it's semi-annual General Conference.  On the opposite side of spectrum, 5 of the 10 least religious metros are in New England; the west coast is the other center of diminished religiosity (with a mini-center in Colorado). 


Questions to ponder: What cultural patterns help to partially explain the levels of religiosity in the United States?  What other factors explain the patterns of religiosity in your in your local area? 


Tags: USA, culture, religion, Christianity.

Lyn Leech's comment, August 23, 2013 5:45 PM
The fact that as you get more westward (disregarding Utah,) religion looses popularity has to do with the people who, in the past, migrated there. It could be argued that super-religious people back in the old days who came from England to escape religious prosecution tended to get to the east coast and then settle there, whereas people who didn't have a church as a tether would be more likely to go out east to look for gold and things. It's an interesting map, regardless and the west's seeming lack of religion may be due to the fact that most of the population of the US is based on the east, due to extreme conditions in the west such as mountains and deserts.
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Chimamanda Adichie: The danger of a single story

"Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice -- and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding."


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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 3:30 PM

This video is very interesting, in that Chimamanda Adichie tells the dangers of hearing a one sided story. It is easy to classify a country with the rest, but it is also inaccurate because they are not the same. This video reminds me of another titled "Media and Culture-- Perspective and Bias" which also takes on the idea of knowing only one side of a story or people. It is videos and people like Adichie and Reza Aslan (from the above mentioned video) that implore us to research and make ourselves knowledgable about a subject, culture, or people before making assumptions and making the mistake of grouping them together for the sake of an easy story.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 4, 2015 7:39 PM

Re-scooped from Professor Dixon. This is an eye opening narrative on what it's like to be African. This video really made me question my own cultural biases and microagressions. Powerful piece.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:50 PM

this is a big problem in the world today in my mind. other places do not have the nationalism that is required to thrive. even this woman (who eventually became an exception) started off idolizing western countries. this is not inherently a problem but places do not try to make themselves better, the reason there is the perception of africa that there is, is because people like this woman are the exception. if more people followed her lead than the whole of Africa would not be seen this way.

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History of the English Language

History of the English Language | World Geography | Scoop.it

"What we know as the English Language today has evolved over thousands of years, influenced by migrating tribes, conquering armies and peaceful trade. Do you know the origins of the language you speak? Have a look at this detailed infographic from  Brighton School of Business and Management."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 12, 2013 10:26 AM

Languages, just like cultures, are incredibly dynamic and have changed over time.  Many people like to imagine an older version of their own culture of "how it used to be" or even "how it's always was."  This is an illusion though, to pretend as though cultural change is something new.  This fantasy allows for people to nostalgically yearn for what once was, even if that perceived pristine past was but a fleeting moment in history that was shaped by many other peoples, places and times. 


Tags: English, language, culture, infographic, historical.

Christian Allié's comment, July 2, 2013 4:41 AM
Interesting scale.....thanks!
joelle's comment, July 2, 2013 10:31 AM
:-)
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Normative Gendered Messages

Normative Gendered Messages | World Geography | Scoop.it

 

Here are two shirts are from the Avengers.  Both are designed for their children apparel production line, but I don't have to tell you which one is marketed for boys and which one is marketed for girls.


Questions to ponder: How (and why) do companies use cultural ideas and values to market their products?  How do companies shape cultural ideas and values?  What impact do messages like this have on a society's culture?  Do seemingly subtle differences is pop cultural products like this matter?  

 

Tags: perspective, culture, gender,  popular culture.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:14 PM

Commercials don't always try to sell you stuff, they try to appeal to you.  Heroism appeals to people, but people are trying to sell you shirts that advertise comicbooks in a trinity of marketing efforts.  Social appeal, by referring to heros, sales by selling the shirt, and advertising comics.  I like comics, but I would rather spend money on comic books, or go into the world and make a difference and BE a hero (or eat a hero at a hoagie hut) than buy one of those shirts.  My spiritual beliefs are open to allowing the sales of these shirts, but my preference does not incline me to actually purchase one.  I am 'free' in this country to buy or not to buy a shirt.  I'm a long-time supporter of art, and I like the idea the shirt puts forward- supporting heroism and comic books, belief in scifi/fantasy art and concepts, and I agree that someone should buy that shirt... but I feel that I could do more by actually being a hero than telling people to be heros.  By using comic book heros, the advertisers say that nobody on this world is a hero, because they 'aren't real,' but also that anybody can be a hero by striving towards virtue of the pure ideal idols in the comics.

Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 9:15 PM

Companies before they put any product in the market they do research first for example; what people are buying, they take in consideration gender and culture. And why is that? Because they are not going to create a product that no one is going to buy. The impact that this type of messages like this have on a society’s culture. No matter how many laws are make in favor woman equality are created we are being  perceived as the weak sex, that we need the help of a man to do anything. Sadly but true this type of campaign it was sales

Michele Baker's curator insight, March 12, 2014 11:39 AM

This is a really depressing trend, and one that, as the parent of a daughter, I am all too aware of. It's way past time we start rethinking the way we dictate gender roles in children.

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Business Geography

Business Geography | World Geography | Scoop.it
Grant Thrall, Ph.D., pioneered a new field of study — business geography — at the University of Florida.

 

Business geography involves using sophisticated technologies to interpret and analyze data to help businesses make decisions.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 2013 2:09 PM

I understand that my readers are not people that I need to convince the geo-literacy is an essential component for a 21st century education; but we are the people that need to convince principals, politicians, school administrators, teachers and parents that teaching geography is fundamental.  Consider this an accessible article to use to make the case for geography for someone who sees the educational value from a business perspective.


Tags: edtech, unit 1 GeoPrinciples, geo-inspiration, geography education, models, spatial.

Tony Hall's curator insight, April 15, 2013 9:43 PM

While I find business quite boring, I do understand it's necessity. I think this illustrates very nicely the relevance of studying geography and how it relates to the "real" world. 

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Regions of Interaction

Regions of Interaction | World Geography | Scoop.it
Put away that old Rand McNally map — it's time for a new way to see what America really looks like.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 17, 2013 6:25 PM

There is a great series of maps in this NPR article that show that internal political divisions do not always line up with actual regional interactions.  The map of the United States shows the what money flows within regions that do not always follow state borders (see Wisconsin, Idaho and Pennsylvania).  The map of Great Britain shows the connections based on telephone calls.

 

TagsUSA, UK, borders, mapping, regions.

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More Risk, but Less Fear, in Cities

More Risk, but Less Fear, in Cities | World Geography | Scoop.it

"This week's Boston Marathon bombing fit with the norm of U.S. terrorist events and threats in one important way: it occurred in a major city. American concerns about terrorism, however, seem to ignore that pattern...There’s a divide on people’s thoughts about terrorism. People that live in places most likely to be hit by terrorism seem the most sunny about the country’s anti-terror prospects and efforts. And those in rural places,  are more concerned and pessimistic."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 2013 2:01 PM

This article cites data from the PEW Reseach Center that implies that city dwellers seem to feel less dread about terror threats than their suburban and rural counterparts, despite the fact they live in the primary target zone (see full size infographic here--note that the data was assembled before the Boston Marathon attack).  


Question to Ponder: Why are the Americans most vulnerable to terrorist attacks the least concerned with terrorism? 

 

Tagsterrorism, statistics, USA, infographic, urban.

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Chechnya: 200 years of background in four minutes


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Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 16, 2015 1:20 PM

Chechnya may not be a country that one hears much about, but it is a country who has suffered the most from its powerful reigning neighboring countries. Chechnya has important oil deposits, as well as natural gas and others. Overall, Oil is a resource a lot of countries fight for and this is why Chechnya suffers from Russia. Russia wants to have territorial denomination of Chechnya. Russia throughout the years has fought and bombed over Chechnya for territory. It is similar to the situation in Africa, where small nations have been trying to break free from their regional superpowers and colonial rulers. The resulting anarchy in Chechnya strengthened Russian belief that the region should not become independent and undermine its territorial integrity. Overall, this is a problem all over the world and Chechnya still stands strong as an independent country. 

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 1:40 PM

Clearly, Chechnya has a very violent past. It is nothing but a place of death and heavy conflict. You can even say it had a genocide going on, when the citizens of Chechnya was sent to Siberia to pretty much be killed off by the extreme cold. It is also important to understand that Chechnya wants to be it's own country. It is sad to hear about this country in such  negative way with all the fighting going on and the fact that the Boston Marathon bombers came from there... Why could we not hear of it in a better way better way? For example, they want to be a country of their own. 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 1:47 PM

first off i would like to say that i am pretty sure half of the world did not even know Chechnya existed until the marathon bombing happened. also this stuff is really important to know because it give you background and insight into what these people were thinking and how what goes on on the other side of the world can twist people in such a way that it effects us here at home.

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What the World Eats

What the World Eats | World Geography | Scoop.it
What's on family dinner tables around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet"

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Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 4:02 PM

This gallery of 16 families from around world together with their week food is quite a treat that shows agricultural, development and cultural patterns.  Pictured above is the Ayme family from Ecuador, just one of the many family's highlighted in the book Hungry Planet.  The Ayme family that typically spends $31.55 on food and commonly eat potato soup with cabbage.  

 

Tags: food, agriculture, worldwide, consumption, unit 5 agriculture, book reviews, culture, development, unit 3 culture.

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MAPS: A Poll Asked Europeans Which Countries Were Drunkest, Hottest, And Had the Silliest Accents

MAPS: A Poll Asked Europeans Which Countries Were Drunkest, Hottest, And Had the Silliest Accents | World Geography | Scoop.it
Also, which is the favorite country in Europe (MAPS: A Poll Asked Europeans Which Countries Were Drunkest, Hottest, And Had the Silliest Accents http://t.co/vhlZI2SHbj)...
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Freshwater Stores Shrank in Tigris-Euphrates Basin

Freshwater Stores Shrank in Tigris-Euphrates Basin | World Geography | Scoop.it
An arid region grew even drier between 2003 and 2009 due to human consumption of water for drinking and agriculture.

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James Hobson's curator insight, October 22, 2014 6:24 PM

(Southwest Asia topic 2)

The area known as the Cradle of Humanity is becoming less hospitable. Though natural climate change can be attributed to the dryer conditions, humans have made just as much of an impact. Increased water usage leads to less reserve. Impacts stretch further, however. Less water flow below the dam can lead to changes in sedimentation patterns and disrupt wildlife habitats, potentially causing harm to wildlife.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:09 PM

Similar to the Aral Sea,  the Tigris and Euphrates river basins have become drier and drier between 2003 and 2009. It is important to see all the aspects that have caused the rive to dry out and its do to there own people in this region. About 60 percent of the loss was attributed to the pumping of groundwater from underground reservoirs. Most of the problems are due to that about one-fifth of the water losses came from snowpack shrinking and soil drying up, partly in response to a 2007 drought. These could be some of the environmental issues but also there has been tremendous population increases in this region. This water is perfect drinking water for the people of South East Asia and the countries surrounding it but numbers are extremely high. 

It is important to analyze how us humans can change the geography of a certain area in such little time. 

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 4:19 PM

The middle east has lost a huge portion of its freshwater over the past decade. The two natural-color images above were acquired by the Landsat satellites and show the shrinking of the Qadisiyah Reservoir in Iraq between September 7, 2006 and September 15, 2009. The first graph shows the elevation of the water in that reservoir between January 2003 and December 2009. The second graph shows water storage from January 2003 to December 2009. Obtaining ground data information in the middle east can be difficult.The researchers calculated that about one-fifth of the water losses in their Tigris-Euphrates study region came from snowpack shrinking and soil drying up, partly in response to a 2007 drought.

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Urban Agriculture

Urban Agriculture | World Geography | Scoop.it

"Aerial photo tour across countries and continents with a French photographer Yann Arthus-Bertrand"


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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, September 17, 2014 12:10 PM

In a time where more people are moving away from their rural roots to try and make it big in the city, I think it's becoming more and more important that we focus on how to utilize our urban surroundings in a beneficial way. These photos are proof that it is possible, and I believe that cities in the United States should be more open to urban farming. It could be a way to not only take pressure off of families in cities trying to feed their children, but will also educate all sorts of people on where food comes from, and the importance of the environment. 

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2014 3:16 PM

Urban agriculture is a reality in third world countries. In Dominican Republic almost everyone in the country side have its own land to plant necessary food and fruits. The most popular is plantain and fruit is orange.

In urban areas is rare to see this, so is surprising to see how central Asians are doing it.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:58 PM

I love Yann Arthus-Bertrand's photography; so many of them are geography lessons in and of themselves as he captures compelling images of the cultural landscape.  This particular gallery shows 32 stunning images including this one above showing urban agriculture in Geneva, Switzerland.    


"Worldwide, there are 800 million amateur farmers in built-up areas. In estates in south eastern Asia and some towns in central and South America, many people depend on this activity for survival. It’s the same story in Europe; in Berlin there are more than 80,000 urban farmers, and in Russia more than 72% of all urban homes till their own patch of land, balcony or even roof. Urban agriculture is on the [rise] and there could be twice as many people enjoying it within twenty years."

 

Tags: agriculture, foodlandscape, images, urban, unit 5 agriculture, unit 7 cities. 

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China's one-child policy creates massive gender imbalance

The Chinese government says its so-called "one-child policy" has succeeded in reining in its population. But more than three decades after the policy's imple...

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Christina Dadaian's comment, July 5, 2013 4:13 PM
They'll have to balance out eventually. Either that or have the entire population suffer. It may take time but I imagine that things will correct themselves before it's too late.
Brooklyn McKenzie's comment, August 2, 2013 12:14 PM
It's kind of sad. I hope that those four brothers will some day find the love of their life. It must be pretty sad to see happy couples when you're single. Maybe one day things will even out.
Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 21, 2013 5:28 PM

This video gives a summary of the extreme consequences the "one-child policy" China has set in place. There are so many more men than women now, many are left to be bachelors for life. Many Chinese women are moving into the city looking for a rich and powerful man, and they succeed because there men are eager to marry. The Chinese have always had a preference for male children over female children. Now that the difference in population in so high, the government has made it illegal for doctors to tell parents the sex of their child before birth. This is a great example of the different kinds of culture that exist on the other side of the world. 

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The Big Squeeze: Can Cities Save The Earth?

The Big Squeeze: Can Cities Save The Earth? | World Geography | Scoop.it
What if you put all 7 billion humans into one city, a city as dense as New York, with its towers and skyscrapers? How big would that 7 billion-sized city be? As big as New Jersey? Texas? Bigger? Are cities protecting wild spaces on the planet?

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 2:12 PM

Its been known that Americans have lavish lifestyles compared to outher populous countries. In this article they show a represntation if the entire world lived like (had as much space) americans and it was astoudning. It would take 4 earths to fit the world if everyone had this lavish lifestyle. So we obviously need to change our ways. Cities ae very helpful to sharing this earth. They serve as a main hub so youll only have to ship to a few places. This with the shortening of distances would save tons of gas and othe rescources. But as the article states everyone living in a Main city wouldnt be possible because people need to produce outside the city. So in my opinion for this city world to work it would need to be a few megacities preferably one on each continent and for them to the city be surronded by production methods.

Bryan Chung's curator insight, May 8, 2014 7:40 PM

cool

Peter Hillman's curator insight, July 22, 2014 11:42 PM

An interactive site for comparisons of city sizes

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Writing FRQs

"AP Human Geography Free Response Questions should be approached in a very deliberate and specific way. APHG teacher Tom Landon explains his approach to teaching students how to do it."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 11, 2013 3:10 PM

For those preparing students for the AP Human Geography test, this video gives great advice to help you instruct students on how to approach the Free Response Questions (FRQs).  Understanding the content always comes first, but some bright students who I know understand the content fail to read the instructions or to answer every portion of the questions.  This will help those APHG students.


TagsAPHG, training, geography education.

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Crisis Guide: Iran

Crisis Guide: Iran | World Geography | Scoop.it

"Iran poses steep challenges to its Middle East neighbors and the world. Explore the country's complex regime structure and controversial nuclear program, and watch experts debate the range of policy options."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 11, 2013 7:08 PM

Iran is in the middle of one of the most important geopolitical regions. One the bordered with Iraq and the Persian Gulf, Iran is stratgeically positioned to have considerable control over the world’s most important waterway for oil shipping and trade, the Strait of Hormuz.


Given it's context, Iran is a country that students should more about than the three main facts that that most Americans are already aware of (1-Iran has an Islamic-based government, 2-an emerging nuclear program and 3-a ton of oil).  This interactive feature is a good starting point with great videos, timelines, maps, articles that assess the current situation in Iran. 


Tags: Iran, political, Middle East.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 22, 2013 12:35 AM

This is an amzing resource to use and find out much about this country, both its past and present.  With this you can understand their feeling of hatred toward the US with its support of the Shah.  This is a relationship that the US needs to repair, but both sides need to work on this.  This are is so important to the US and the world given Iran's geographic location right on the Persian Gulf, whcih they can cut off and controll the oil flowing from that area, plus the oil they control, plus bordering several crucial US and NATO allies.  It only seems in everyone's best interest to sit down and talk.  Given the support Iran gives to many terrorists organization and it's longstanding position that Israel does not have the right the right to exist, this idea of sitting down and talking may be a fantasy.  However, with the new elections and the new President of Iran speaking at the UN there may be renewed hope of at least a start. 

Rescooped by Paul Beavers from Geography Education
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APHG Study App

APHG Study App | World Geography | Scoop.it

"App4Success APHuG is an intuitive app for students to excel in AP Human Geography. Created by two students who scored 5 on all their AP Exams, the app is organized by the topics* indicated by the College Board."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 2013 3:20 PM

I'm not an iPhone or iPad user, but this $1.99 app has received good reviews from within the APHG communities.  Please share in the comments section any feedback. 

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How Geography Explains the United States

How Geography Explains the United States | World Geography | Scoop.it

Via Emma Lafleur, Seth Dixon
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Mary Patrick Schoettinger's curator insight, April 18, 2013 9:39 AM

There are so many facets to geography and the United States has certainly benefitted from all of them; from location to abundant natural resources to cultural histories. I think this is a good introduction to the topic.

Louis Culotta's comment, April 18, 2013 12:41 PM
I would think that the united states treats Canada a lot better at than in Mexico because of the border issues that exist because of people trying to smuggle drugs or people into America from Mexico continues to be abig problem with the US goverment.
Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 1:48 PM

I think the very last paragraph of this article is one of the truest statements about America that I have ever read.  "There's so much good America can do in the world." This is absolutely true because as the author covered, the U.S. is very good at getting involved in foreign affairs and we are extremely lucky to have the borders that we do.  We're safe on this side of the globe, a world away from the places that have suffered religious and political turmoil for centuries.  

However, the citizens of the U.S. often remain marginally uneducated about out foreign affairs because of the portrayals by the media and the many covered up mistakes that the U.S. has made.  The author of this piece noted America's three major faults as pragmatism, idealism, arrogance and ambivalence.  The United States is ultimately the most conceited country in the world but it's not entirely the fault of its citizens.  U.S. media's job is not necessarily to report the truth but report the fractions of truth that will continue to inspire nationalism, even if that means leaving out the fact that many problems around the world have been increased due to America's participation.

The author of this piece pointed out America's habit of only joining in when it is beneficial for our country, even if it is not in the best interest of the people we are helping.  We offered assistance to the reformers in Egypt but ignored problems raging in Bahrain.  The U.S. has only limited understanding of many of the old, traditional cultures that reign in parts of the Middle East but that does not stop the country from trying to help and often, looking foolish or inciting more unrest.

We have grown to feel very safe in on our side of the planet and regardless of the few attacks that have penetrated America's defense, we still have a very limited world view because there are no threats from our neighbors and it is okay to be whomever you'd like to be (technically speaking because racism, sexism, and homophobia are still rampant in this country) without threats from people around you.  It would be in our country's best interest to educate ourselves on world events and other cultures to be well rounded and less offensive to those who suffer in other regions. The author called America's belief that the problems between Israeli's and Palestinians would resolve with a classic Hollywood happy ending a part of America's problem with idealism and not understanding what it is like to have neighbors who want to dive in during the midst of horrible wars and take whatever they can get their hands on.   Having the borders that it does, it was never a real threat that the U.S. faced. 

I think this article is spot on with the problems in U.S. foreign policy and how geography affects our culture and our ideas of how the world works.

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The Geography of Chechnya

The Geography of Chechnya | World Geography | Scoop.it
The Caucasus region, dominated by the imposing Great Caucasus mountain range and stretching between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea, has long been known as one of the world’s ethnically and linguistically most diverse areas.

Via Seth Dixon
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Marissa Roy's curator insight, November 19, 2013 10:16 AM

Most Americans had never heard Chechnya before the Boston bombing in April 2013. Now, most think that it is full of America-hating terriosts. However, Chechnya is so very complex and diverse a place, that it is ludacris to think that. Over 100 languages are spoken in the country. The southern half speaks languages such as Georgian, Svan and Mingrelian. Turkish, Iranian and Chechens are the languages you will probably hear in the North. Another misconception is that there are many Christians in Chechnya as well as Muslims. This country is made up of so many different groups, it is incredible. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 2014 9:27 AM

It is amazing to consider such a small area (the size of New England) could hold such a vast area of languages.  The mountainous region certainly helps in creating such diversity as it isolated villages from each other in the ages before modern communication and travel.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 15, 2014 6:46 PM

This map does a fantastic job of highlighting the cultural diversity within Russia and the former Soviet states. Understanding how these cultural regions overlap one another is paramount in understanding the region's tensions and the repercussions that result including Chechen terrorism in Russia and even in America (Boston bombings).

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Border Walls

Border Walls | World Geography | Scoop.it

"Geographer Reece Jones discusses his recent book Border Walls, examining the history of how and why societies have chosen to literally wall themselves apart.  He gives a brief history of political maps, how international lines reshape landscapes, and how the trend towards increased border wall construction contrasts with the view of a “borderless” world under globalization."


Via Seth Dixon
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Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 9:00 AM
listening to some of the podcast you can get an in-depth synopsis of this. the walls that divide our countries and even towns over time have all the criteria and/or reasoning. Great Wall of China to keep invaders from starting war, Berlin Wall to divide german supporters of war, America/Mexican boarder is to keep illegal immigrants from coming, fence in your moms backyard is to keep neighbors/animals out of yard. Walls all have the same concept of avoiding war, trespassers and privacy. this is seen in not only everyday living but in military use as well.
Amanda Morgan's comment, September 13, 2014 4:49 PM
I found this podcast to be interesting because it seems as though the more popular globalization is becoming, and the more it grows, there are more borders and walls being built. By secluding the poor communities, wealthier communities could essentially cut them off to the rest of the globe.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:52 AM

I found this podcast to be interesting because it seems as though the more popular globalization is becoming, and the more it grows, there are more borders and walls being built. By secluding the poor communities, wealthier communities could essentially cut them off to the rest of the globe.

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What the World Eats

What the World Eats | World Geography | Scoop.it
What's on family dinner tables around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet"

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Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 4:02 PM

This gallery of 16 families from around world together with their week food is quite a treat that shows agricultural, development and cultural patterns.  Pictured above is the Ayme family from Ecuador, just one of the many family's highlighted in the book Hungry Planet.  The Ayme family that typically spends $31.55 on food and commonly eat potato soup with cabbage.  

 

Tags: food, agriculture, worldwide, consumption, unit 5 agriculture, book reviews, culture, development, unit 3 culture.