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Fracking runs high risk of polluting countryside, Environment Agency report warns

Fracking runs high risk of polluting countryside, Environment Agency report warns | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it
A study says the controversial mining technique could result in chemicals damaging the environment
Maria Nunzia @Varvera 's insight:

How safe is fracking? And who is doing and saying what?

 

Read the research and sample reports on the impact of fracking with regard to: water,food,microbes,environment,health and make up your own mind.

 

Fracking In Spotlight in Texas As Ample Oil, No Water The Guardian 17 August 2013

http://www.lcsun-news.com/las_cruces-news/ci_23883524/fracking-spotlight-texas-ample-oil-no-water

 

Fracking 'threatens God's glorious'Creation' - Telegraph 14 August 2013

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/10240773/Fracking-threatens-Gods-glorious-creation.html

 

 

George Osborne's father-in-law and the secret frackers of Winsor Castel Mirror 14 Aug 2013 

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/george-osbornes-father-in-law-secret-frackers-2163020#ixzz2bxnkEDZn

 

 

Fracking chemicals may be making oil more dangerous SALON 13 August 2013 

http://www.salon.com/2013/08/13/fracking_chemicals_may_be_making_oil_more_dangerous/

 

Utah Methane Leaks In Gas Fields Higer Than Originally Thought Challenging US Estimates 12 August 2013 Huff Post Green 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/06/utah-methane-leaking-gas-fields_n_3715303.html

 

 

Journalist’s Resource 17 May 2013

Fracking, shale gass and health effects: Research roundup.

 

“…exploiting them could have significant environmental and health impacts, including air and water pollution as well as long-term risks such as cancer and respiratory illnesses…”

http://journalistsresource.org/studies/environment/climate-change/fracking-shale-gas-health-effects-research-roundup

 

 

Insurance Journal 31 July 2013Fracking Tied to Drinking Water Damage by EPA Regional Officialhttp://www.insurancejournal.com/news/national/2013/07/31/300103.htm

 

grist 24 May 2013

 

Facking accident leaks benzene into Colorado Stream

http://grist.org/news/fracking-accident-frack-cident-leaks-benzene-into-colorado-stream/

 

Guardian 24 April 2013

 

Cuadrilla censured by advertising watchdog over fracking safety claims

Advertising Standards Authority orders shale gas company to tone down claims that it uses 'proven, safe technologies'

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/apr/24/caudrilla-censured-fracking-safety-claims

 

Lancaster Eagle Gazette 16 March 2013

 

Fracking fluid 'spills' into Ohio waterways - a sign fracking should be halted until a safe method is found

http://www.lancastereaglegazette.com/article/20130316/OPINION03/303160027/Fracking-fluid-spills-into-Ohio-waterways-sign-fracking-should-halted-until-safe-method-found?gcheck=1

 

SALON 18 May 2011

 

How gas drilling contaminates your food

http://www.salon.com/2011/05/18/fracking_food_supply/

 

Ecologist 28 January 2013

 

Special report Livestock falling ill in fracking regions, raising concerns about food. http://www.theecologist.org/News/news_analysis/1784382/livestock_falling_ill_in_fracking_regions_raising_concerns_about_food.html

 

 

The Ohio State University Research and Innovation Communications 

 

DNA Analysis of Microbes in Fracking Site Yields Suprises 12 March 2012

 

“They also found that the populations of microbes changed dramatically over a short period of time, as some species perished during the fracking operation and others became more abundant.  One—an as-yet-unidentified bacterium—actually prospered, and eventually made up 90 percent of the microbial population in fluids taken from the fracked well”

http://researchnews.osu.edu/archive/frackmicrob.htm

 

 

Concerned Health Professionals of NY

 

Professional Perspectives on Health Impacts of Hydrofracking 30 November 2012

http://concernedhealthny.org/professional-perspectives-on-health-impacts-of-hydrofracking/

 

The Tribune Democrat

 

Fracking will affect economy, environment. 20 September 2012

http://tribune-democrat.com/local/x354156600/Report-Fracking-will-affect-economy-environment

 

 

Journalist's Resource May 2011

 

Methane and the Greenhouse-gas Footprint of Natural Gas from Shale Formations - See more at: http://journalistsresource.org/studies/environment/climate-change/natural-gas-hydrofracking-greenhouse#sthash.OH9rsvUF.dpuf

 

 

 

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, August 16, 2013 12:35 PM

Like the poster says, 'Go and Frack Off'!

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Herbaceous first of a new series of books celebrating the very best in contemporary nature writing

Herbaceous first of a new series of books celebrating the very best in contemporary nature writing | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it

Herbaceous is the fist of a new series of books celebrating the very best in contemporary nature writing. A cross between New Naturalist and King Penguin, the series invites a wide range of authors and artists to choose a particular building, plant, animal, person or landscape, and through this object of their fascination tell us wider stories about the British Isles.

http://littletoller.co.uk/products-page/monographs/herbaceous/

 

Herbaceous  

 

Climate change is eroding the familiar pattern of the seasons, so we turn instinctively to the life cycle of herbaceous plants to guide us through the year. The growing, flowering, seeding and dying back to earth of wild flowers, weeds, herbs and garden perennials sustain and enrich our everyday lives with food, metaphor, joy, anxiety, medicine, stories, beauty and enchantment. Above all, by enabling us to read the changing seasons, plants help us navigate our way in the world.

 

Herbaceous is a journey which follows the colour pulse of plants throughout the year, searching for new rhythms in a changing world. It begins with yellow: the pulse of early insects and the symbol of the returning sun. It is followed by spring’s vernal whites and the hedonist, spirited pinks of summer. Gradually, the strange and melancholy blues of early autumn are replaced by the ripple of seed-setting and a return to the browns of our subterranean winter dreams.

 

Herbaceous is gardening with words. It is a book of audacious botany and poetic vision which asks us to look anew at our relationship with plants and celebrates their power to nourish the human spirit.

 

PAUL EVANS spent many years as a gardener working in rose nurseries, graveyards, historic gardens in Wales and a botanical garden in New York. He is a writer, broadcaster and award-winning playwright, best known for his ‘Country Diary’ in The Guardian and various natural history programmes and drama- documentaries for BBC Radio 4. Paul has also been a performance poet, a nature conservationist, holds a PhD in philosophy, and is currently a lecturer at Bath Spa University. He lives in Much Wenlock, Shropshire, with his family.

 

Published by Little Toller Books on May 12th 2014

210 x 156mm, hardback Price: £12 isbn 978-1-908213-16-7

Jacket over foiled boards,112 pages on 90gsm

Munken paper Jacket and internal illustration by Kurt Jackson


 

Twitter: 

Herbaceous @BooksPaulEvans

Author Paul Evans @DrPaulEvans1                                                                                               Little Toller Publisher @LittleToller                                                                                      Illustrations @KurtJacksonArt 

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Badger watching

Badger watching | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it
I have an interest in all british wildlife but my all time favourite has to be the Badger. Maybe because of their secret life. Shy,elusive,nocturnal are a few words people would use to describe them.
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Jim Perrin Reviews Herbaceous by Paul Evans in The Great Outdoors Magazine.

Jim Perrin Reviews Herbaceous by Paul Evans in The Great Outdoors Magazine. | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it

Herbaceous

By Paul Evans

Little Toller, £12.

ISBN 978-1-908213-16-7

 

There are three pre-eminent figures within the long tradition of British nature writing who are currently producing work that might stand the test of posterity and be seen as classic. Mark Cocker is our great bird-writer, encyclopaedically knowledgeable, dedicated lifelong to his subject; the Scots stravaiger-naturalist Jim Crumley has produced a sequence of passionate tracts for troubled environmental times, rooted in widely authentic experience and underpinned by acute observation. His Scottish wild nature tetralogy, beginning with The Tay Whale and concluding with his recent The Eagle’s Way, is surely one of modern natural history’s masterpieces. The last of our contenders is the Shropshire miniaturist Paul Evans, whose first book has just been published by the small press of Little Toller in Dorset. It’s been worth the long wait.

 

            Those who know Paul Evans’s work probably do so through his frequent country diary columns in The Guardian newspaper, or his dramas, stories and nature programmes on R4. Paul’s the exquisite stylist of our trio, his work condensed down into the briefest formats, vibrant with intensity and compacted information. He’s also the one who holds most close to the fundamental requirement for a nature-writer of having long knowledge of  “one dear, particular place”, to quote Yeats. To write on nature, you have to know beyond intimacy your chosen location.

 

Paul’s location is the Shropshire hill-country in which he was brought up and where he still lives in Much Wenlock. The twenty-mile-long wooded limestone reef of Wenlock Edge is touchstone and point of reference for much of his work. I doubt anyone (other than perhaps Nan Shepherd on the Cairngorms) has ever written with such loving, detailed attentiveness on a single locality.

 

Herbaceous is a slim book, runs to 106 pages and there are plenty of illustrations and white space within that small compass. Along with the distilled quality of the writing, this might lead you to view it as poetry. But prose it undoubtedly is, with the marvellous capacity of that medium for taking the weight and measure of human experience. As, for example, outside the old youth hostel of Wilderhope Manor at the western end of Wenlock Edge:

 

“All those years ago, lacing his boots with other walkers and socialist cyclists, it was a moment he would always remember. And yet there was nothing to it. Socks, dubbin, oilskins, corduroy, camaraderie, ways through open land leading to old hostels like this with no electricity or running water but ghosts, bunks, folded blankets and the smell of ox-tail soup.”

 

Perfect social-history evocations of time and place like this aside, there are stranger mini-essays here that delve into folklore, into myth, into superstitious tales and murderous histories. One two-page essay on black bryony is so densely allusive, so arcanely informed as it flits between the back streets of Wolverhampton, Indian corner-shops and hedge-religion that you feel, after reading it, a whole autobiographical mythopoeia and psychodrama has been enacted before your eyes. Throughout the book there is extraordinary richness, exceptional depth of knowledge, all of it expressed in prose of such jewelled texture that you’re led to read and re-read until it haunts consciousness and memory and will become a part of your way of seeing things – a conjurer’s trick which is the prerogative only of the very finest writers.

 

Not that style here is in the least degree precious. It’s earthy, laced with vernacular, exact, resonant and measured. Also, it summons mysteries, delves our sub-conscious, suggests unheard stories:

 

“There are dark buoys knocked round like heads knapped awkwardly turning this way and that, tethered to some appalling wreck the crabs are picking at way below.”

 

Above all, it sings the land that lives, and intones elegies for those parts of it that have died:

 

“There are the fields open to loss, where peewit and partridge have fled. Fireweed, thistle, ragwort, centaury, meadowsweet and a violet ground beetle; angeldust of grass pollen, crickets and the mad tunes of bees and crow ghosts wrung from dark poplars.”

 

I can think of no-one else who captures quite so well the strangeness, the promise, the infinite loveliness of earth-bound existence. A gem of a book.

Jim Perrin

*******

 

Published in The Great Outdoors Magazine 


Via Herbaceous , Wenlock Edge
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This Massive Squirrel Has Been Saved from Extinction - Scientific American (blog)

This Massive Squirrel Has Been Saved from Extinction - Scientific American (blog) | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it
Scientific American (blog)
This Massive Squirrel Has Been Saved from Extinction
Scientific American (blog)
The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.
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Wildlife: Wyoming wolves get reprieve - Summit County Citizens Voice

Wildlife: Wyoming wolves get reprieve - Summit County Citizens Voice | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it
USA TODAY Wildlife: Wyoming wolves get reprieve Summit County Citizens Voice Earthjustice represented Defenders of Wildlife, Natural Resources Defense Council, the Sierra Club and the Center for Biological Diversity in challenging the Fish and...
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Leaders pledge to end deforestation by 2030 - Mongabay.com

Leaders pledge to end deforestation by 2030 - Mongabay.com | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it
Leaders pledge to end deforestation by 2030
Mongabay.com
The declaration calls for a specific deadline to ending deforestation as well as massive economic incentives for countries to cut forest loss and degradation.
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Trapping wild beavers in Devon would be unlawful, ministers told

Trapping wild beavers in Devon would be unlawful, ministers told | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it
EU habitats directive requires the UK to protect beavers in their natural range, and prohibits killing or capturing them
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Fracking map of Scotland revealed by UK ministers

Fracking map of Scotland revealed by UK ministers | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it
A SWATHE of land covering the Central Belt and much of the Borders and Fife has been identified by UK ministers for controversial shale gas exploration.
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Scrambling birds' brains: Could this toxic algae offer clues to human diseases? - Environmental Health News

Scrambling birds' brains: Could this toxic algae offer clues to human diseases? - Environmental Health News | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it
Scrambling birds' brains: Could this toxic algae offer clues to human diseases?
Environmental Health News
J. STROM THURMOND LAKE, Ga. – From their perch in a loblolly pine, two bald eagles swoop low over a floating flock of wintering coots.
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General Assembly: General debate (24-30 September 2014)

General Assembly: General debate (24-30 September 2014) | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it
This is the video portal of the United Nations Webcast that broadcasts daily, live and on demand video coverage over the Internet of United Nations meetings and events at Headquarters and major United Nations conferences at other locations worldwide...
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How Global Shipping Could Change Our Understanding of Biodiversity | WIRED

How Global Shipping Could Change Our Understanding of Biodiversity | WIRED | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it
A new study argues that the theory biologists use to predict an ecosystem's biodiversity should be modified to account for the global economy.
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Sharing water is key to peace in the Middle East

Sharing water is key to peace in the Middle East | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it
Samantha North highlights the vital role played by water in current conflicts.
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Impact of temperature on belowground soil decomposition

Impact of temperature on belowground soil decomposition | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it
Earth's soils store four times more carbon than the atmosphere and small changes in soil carbon storage can have a big effect on atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. A new paper concludes that climate warming does not accelerate soil organic carbon decomposition or affect soil carbon storage, despite increases in ecosystem productivity.
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In Chile, an Animal Whose Numbers Please No One

In Chile, an Animal Whose Numbers Please No One | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it
Government-sanctioned culling of the guanaco in Tierra del Fuego has drawn opposition from animal rights activists and tourism officials.
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Jim Perrin Reviews Herbaceous by Paul Evans in The Great Outdoors Magazine.

Jim Perrin Reviews Herbaceous by Paul Evans in The Great Outdoors Magazine. | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it

Herbaceous

By Paul Evans

Little Toller, £12.

ISBN 978-1-908213-16-7

 

There are three pre-eminent figures within the long tradition of British nature writing who are currently producing work that might stand the test of posterity and be seen as classic. Mark Cocker is our great bird-writer, encyclopaedically knowledgeable, dedicated lifelong to his subject; the Scots stravaiger-naturalist Jim Crumley has produced a sequence of passionate tracts for troubled environmental times, rooted in widely authentic experience and underpinned by acute observation. His Scottish wild nature tetralogy, beginning with The Tay Whale and concluding with his recent The Eagle’s Way, is surely one of modern natural history’s masterpieces. The last of our contenders is the Shropshire miniaturist Paul Evans, whose first book has just been published by the small press of Little Toller in Dorset. It’s been worth the long wait.

 

 Those who know Paul Evans’s work probably do so through his frequent country diary columns in The Guardian newspaper, or his dramas, stories and nature programmes on R4. Paul’s the exquisite stylist of our trio, his work condensed down into the briefest formats, vibrant with intensity and compacted information. He’s also the one who holds most close to the fundamental requirement for a nature-writer of having long knowledge of  “one dear, particular place”, to quote Yeats. To write on nature, you have to know beyond intimacy your chosen location.

 

Paul’s location is the Shropshire hill-country in which he was brought up and where he still lives in Much Wenlock. The twenty-mile-long wooded limestone reef of Wenlock Edge is touchstone and point of reference for much of his work. I doubt anyone (other than perhaps Nan Shepherd on the Cairngorms) has ever written with such loving, detailed attentiveness on a single locality.

 

Herbaceous is a slim book, runs to 106 pages and there are plenty of illustrations and white space within that small compass. Along with the distilled quality of the writing, this might lead you to view it as poetry. But prose it undoubtedly is, with the marvellous capacity of that medium for taking the weight and measure of human experience. As, for example, outside the old youth hostel of Wilderhope Manor at the western end of Wenlock Edge:

 

“All those years ago, lacing his boots with other walkers and socialist cyclists, it was a moment he would always remember. And yet there was nothing to it. Socks, dubbin, oilskins, corduroy, camaraderie, ways through open land leading to old hostels like this with no electricity or running water but ghosts, bunks, folded blankets and the smell of ox-tail soup.”

 

Perfect social-history evocations of time and place like this aside, there are stranger mini-essays here that delve into folklore, into myth, into superstitious tales and murderous histories. One two-page essay on black bryony is so densely allusive, so arcanely informed as it flits between the back streets of Wolverhampton, Indian corner-shops and hedge-religion that you feel, after reading it, a whole autobiographical mythopoeia and psychodrama has been enacted before your eyes. Throughout the book there is extraordinary richness, exceptional depth of knowledge, all of it expressed in prose of such jewelled texture that you’re led to read and re-read until it haunts consciousness and memory and will become a part of your way of seeing things – a conjurer’s trick which is the prerogative only of the very finest writers.

 

Not that style here is in the least degree precious. It’s earthy, laced with vernacular, exact, resonant and measured. Also, it summons mysteries, delves our sub-conscious, suggests unheard stories:

 

“There are dark buoys knocked round like heads knapped awkwardly turning this way and that, tethered to some appalling wreck the crabs are picking at way below.”

 

Above all, it sings the land that lives, and intones elegies for those parts of it that have died:

 

“There are the fields open to loss, where peewit and partridge have fled. Fireweed, thistle, ragwort, centaury, meadowsweet and a violet ground beetle; angeldust of grass pollen, crickets and the mad tunes of bees and crow ghosts wrung from dark poplars.”

 

I can think of no-one else who captures quite so well the strangeness, the promise, the infinite loveliness of earth-bound existence. A gem of a book.

Jim Perrin

*******

 

Published in The Great Outdoors Magazine 


Via Herbaceous , Wenlock Edge
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Mysterious New Poison Dart Frog Found; Is Size of Fingernail

Mysterious New Poison Dart Frog Found; Is Size of Fingernail | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it
A new species of bright-orange, fingernail-size frog found in a Panama rain forest is unlike any of its relatives, scientists say.

Via Bourdoncle
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Sphere Creatures Could Be Among World's Earliest Animals - NBCNews.com

Sphere Creatures Could Be Among World's Earliest Animals - NBCNews.com | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it
NBCNews.com
Sphere Creatures Could Be Among World's Earliest Animals
NBCNews.com
A series of mysterious spherical fossils found in southern China may be remnants of some of the world's earliest animals.
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U.S. Creates Largest Protected Area in the World, 3X Larger Than California

U.S. Creates Largest Protected Area in the World, 3X Larger Than California | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it
White House announces expansion of national monument around remote Pacific islands. (RT @NatGeo: U.S.
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Fracking defined – and why you should care - OCRegister

Fracking defined – and why you should care - OCRegister | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it
Vidette Online Fracking defined – and why you should care OCRegister The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines fracking or hydraulic fracturing as a “well stimulation process used to maximize the extraction of underground resources;...
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Wildlife depletion, child labour and crime - Kashmir Times

Wildlife depletion, child labour and crime - Kashmir Times | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it
What do overfishing, wildlife trafficking, and endangered species all have in common?
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New study: Global warming triggers surge in tree growth

New study: Global warming triggers surge in tree growth | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it

Some trees are growing up to 70 percent faster than just a half century ago, as global warming supercharges their metabolism, German researchers report in a new study published in Nature Communications


Three decades ago, forest dieback was a hot topic, with the very survival of large forest ecosystems seemingly in doubt. But instead of a collapse, the latest studies indicate that forests have actually been growing at a faster rate. The new data from the Technische Universität München comes from forest plots that have been closely monitored since 1870. The forested areas are also representative of the typical climate and environmental conditions found in Central Europe.


“Our findings are based on a unique data pool,” maintains Prof. Hans Pretzsch from TUM’s Chair for Forest Growth and Yield, who headed up the study.


Via Sam Radcliffe
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Weather Radar Captures Flocks of Birds Taking Off | Culturing Science, Scientific American Blog Network

Weather Radar Captures Flocks of Birds Taking Off | Culturing Science, Scientific American Blog Network | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it
Several times a week, if not every day, I look at Doppler radar maps so I know whether to take an umbrella when I leave the ...
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How Will Climate Change Affect Mountain Gorillas? | Extinction Countdown, Scientific American Blog Network

How Will Climate Change Affect Mountain Gorillas? | Extinction Countdown, Scientific American Blog Network | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it
When you live on the top of a mountain, you don't have many places to run if the environment of that mountain habitat changes. Look at ...
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What is killing Bristol County's bees? - Wicked Local Dighton

What is killing Bristol County's bees? - Wicked Local Dighton | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it
What is killing Bristol County's bees?
Wicked Local Dighton
Brian D.
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Underwater expedition may have revealed earliest site of human habitation in Canada

Underwater expedition may have revealed earliest site of human habitation in Canada | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it

Researchers using a robotic underwater vehicle off British Columbia’s northern coast believe they may have found the earliest evidence of human habitation in Canada


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Simon King Wildlife

Simon King Wildlife | World Environment Nature News | Scoop.it
Whether it's from far flung places or the intimacy of your back garden, Simon King helps you make the most out of your encounters with the natural world.
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