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Archeology from Space

TED Talks In this short talk, TED Fellow Sarah Parcak introduces the field of "space archeology" -- using satellite images to search for clues to the lost sites of past civilizations.

 

The uses of geospatial technologies is NOT limited to studying geography, but it is the bedrock of many research projects that involve spatial thinking (as demonstrated in this TED talk).  Geographic principles and geographers can be very important  members of interdisciplinary teams.

 

Tags: spatial, remote sensing, geospatial, TED, MiddleEast, historical. 


Via Seth Dixon
Joshua Lefkowitz's insight:

This sounds really intruging to me; I have heard of astroarchiology before in the aplication of finding undiscovered large objects (cities, towns sttlements) by using satellites to map deviations in teh earths surface accurately enough to distingush structures like a building foundation. I just find this sort of thing fascinating. I am still in awe that this dort of thing is possible.

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Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from Amazing Science
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The world’s oldest astronomers: Scientists use ancient trees to look back on the history of our local cosmos

The world’s oldest astronomers: Scientists use ancient trees to look back on the history of our local cosmos | World Civilizations I | Scoop.it
Scientists in Japan use ancient trees to look back on the history of our local cosmos, and discover a mystery.

 

Since the invention of the telescope in the year 1608, mankind has collected information about our local cosmos. As it turns out, we’re not the only ones. Trees have been doing the same for millennia.

 

A group of physicists led by Nagoya University graduate student Fusa Miyake has begun using information stored in ancient Japanese cedars to gain the oldest firsthand accounts of the local universe. They have discovered, hidden within tree rings, clear evidence of some surprisingly high-energy events—possibly supernovae or solar flares—that occurred more than 1200 years ago.

 

On Japan’s Yakushima island, trees regularly live at least a thousand years, thriving under the tree equivalent of a low-carb diet in the form of a low-nutrition granite bedrock that encourages a slower pace of growth. Miyake and her team examined core samples from two trees on this small island. Back at Nagoya University, they studied the number and thickness of the tree’s rings not just to determine the age of the trees but also to gather information about the atmosphere they breathed.

 

When high-energy radiation from space enters Earth’s upper atmosphere, it interacts with naturally occurring atmospheric molecules to produce the isotope carbon-14. As trees are firmly plugged into the earth’s carbon cycle by photosynthesis, the carbon-14 ends up in each tree ring, creating an annual record etched into the flesh of the tree of the average carbon-14 level in Earth’s atmosphere.

 

Miyake and her colleagues had good reason to focus on the rings corresponding to 775 AD. A previous project called IntCal, which uses tree records of carbon-14 levels to calibrate carbon-14 dating, had seen a noticeable rise in carbon-14 levels toward the end of the 8th century.

The signal Miyake’s team found was far above anything seen in recent times, indicating that Earth had been bombarded by an extremely intense burst of radiation. The rings revealed that, over the course of one year, the atmospheric level of carbon-14 rose 1.2 percent: nearly 20 times the normal variation.

 

This massive flash of radiation could have been caused by a supernova; a gamma ray burst from a supremely rare galactic event such as a collision of two neutron stars; or a super solar flare at least 10 times the size of the largest observed flare.

 

Using their knowledge of earth sciences, biology and astronomy, Miyake’s team uncovered a smoking gun in a cosmological whodunit. Now all that remains is to identify who fired that gun.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Abel Farias's curator insight, December 2, 2013 5:38 PM

You can find history in any object. Whenever archeologists look for new fossils they are looking for a something that tells them a story. In this article they talk about how tree rings explain how the environment was during the life of the tree. I would use this article in Chemistry class during the Carbon Dating unit. It shows how recent day scientist used carbon dating to make a new discovery

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Drought May Have Killed Sumerian Language

Drought May Have Killed Sumerian Language | World Civilizations I | Scoop.it
The first epic poem was written in Sumerian, which died out during a 200-year dry spell.

 

A 200-year-long drought 4,200 years ago may have killed off the ancient Sumerian language, one geologist says.

 

Because no written accounts explicitly mention drought as the reason for the Sumerian demise, the conclusions rely on indirect clues.

 

But several pieces of archaeological and geological evidence tie the gradual decline of the Sumerian civilization to a drought.


Via David Connolly
Joshua Lefkowitz's insight:

This is a bit more applicable during the infancy of human civilization; but humans tend to forget that we are part of an ecosystem and have the potential to ruin it; futhermore we, like any other animal, are als suseptable to teh biomes natural fluctuations.

 

Although it seems that this evidence is speculated I would not be suprized if there was some truth to this thoery.

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Joshua Lefkowitz's curator insight, January 24, 2014 7:55 PM
This is a bit more applicable during the infancy of human civilization; but humans tend to forget that we are part of an ecosystem and have the potential to ruin it; futhermore we, like any other animal, are als suseptable to teh biomes natural fluctuations.

 

Although it seems that this evidence is speculated I would not be suprized if there was some truth to this thoery.

Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from Science News
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4500-year old Sumerian temple found in Ur

4500-year old Sumerian temple found in Ur | World Civilizations I | Scoop.it

Iraqi and foreign archaeologists have uncovered a temple at the Sumerian city of Ur, which dates back to about 2500 B.C., the head of the Antiquities Department says.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
Joshua Lefkowitz's insight:

Although I am likely to be mstakenI though Ur was a previously discovered city, perhapse they just uncovered a new section of it; however I did not get that from the text. As Sumeria is so of a scociological missing link for humans I think it is important to aknowledge this sort of thing.

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joseph mora's curator insight, October 10, 2013 1:40 PM

ancient summerian city found that dates to 2500 BC

Joshua Lefkowitz's curator insight, January 24, 2014 7:56 PM

Although I am likely to be mstaken ,I though Ur was a previously discovered city, perhapse they just uncovered a new section of it; however I did not get that from the text. As Sumeria is so of a scociological missing link for humans I think it is important to aknowledge this sort of thing.

Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from Early Western Civilization
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Hammurabi, Sixth King of Babylon

Hammurabi, Sixth King of Babylon | World Civilizations I | Scoop.it
A profile of Hammurabi, king of the 1st dynasty of Babylon, known for his code of laws, the Code of Hammurabi.

Via David Walp
Joshua Lefkowitz's insight:

One of the most previlent points of teh history ofthis era was of the great king named Hammurabi. It is interesting that his set of seemingly obvious "rules" was teh first of it's kind; the first time it was bothered to be written down. Based on these soscial principles modern western soscial principles; even the basis of written civil law.

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Joshua Lefkowitz's curator insight, January 24, 2014 7:56 PM

One of the most previlent points of teh history ofthis era was of the great king named Hammurabi. It is interesting that his set of seemingly obvious "rules" was teh first of it's kind; the first time it was bothered to be written down. Based on these soscial principles modern western soscial principles; even the basis of written civil law.

Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from Archaeology News
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Archeology: First Temple Era reservoir discovered - Israel - ANSAMed.it

Archeology: First Temple Era reservoir discovered - Israel - ANSAMed.it | World Civilizations I | Scoop.it
Archeology: First Temple Era reservoir discovered, Water reservoir at Wailing Wall was for public use, , Israel, Ansa (Archeology: First Temple Era reservoir discovered - Israel - ANSAMed.it http://t.co/mHWt57ND...)...

Via David Connolly
Joshua Lefkowitz's insight:

Although well excavated, teh temple mount is an hugely important cultural site for three of the worlds major religions. Despite being farily mundain, I think most people can apreciate knowing a little more about how teh "Acnient" actually lived on a day to day basis.

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Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from World at War
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Witness to War: Preserving the Stories of War Veterans | World War Two History, Stories, and Photos

Witness to War: Preserving the Stories of War Veterans | World War Two History, Stories, and Photos | World Civilizations I | Scoop.it
The Witness to War Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to preserving the stories and unique experiences of combat veterans.

Via Global Research
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Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from World History - SHS
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Volunteers unearth mass graves of Russia's fallen WWII soldiers - BBC News

Volunteers unearth mass graves of Russia's fallen WWII soldiers - BBC News | World Civilizations I | Scoop.it
BBC News
Volunteers unearth mass graves of Russia's fallen WWII soldiers
BBC News
At the close of the Second World War, around 4 million Soviet soldiers were missing in action.

Via Joy Kinley
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Joy Kinley's curator insight, January 14, 2014 12:08 PM

Russia suffered the most casualtiesof any country involved during WWII.  Often with mass graves it is impossible to verify the people however these soldiers would have some form of ID on them.  Why do you think so many people are volunteering their time and money to bury these soldiers?

Joshua Lefkowitz's curator insight, January 16, 2014 7:47 PM

World war two was not all that long ago in the grand scheme of things; it was the first war that was "fully captures on film and there are still some veterans alive today (although thier numbers are dwindelling. I cannot believe something this massive could go unnoted for a half century. I guess this just goes to schow the true scale of the largest war ever fought.

Nick Lesley's comment, May 17, 2014 10:08 AM
Russia dealt with alot of suffering after WW2, with all the deaths and what not.... so they had a ton of burying to do.
Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from World History - SHS
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London skulls reveal gruesome evidence of Roman head hunters

London skulls reveal gruesome evidence of Roman head hunters | World Civilizations I | Scoop.it
Improved forensic techniques have shed new light on 39 skulls excavated near Museum of London in 1988 Scores of skulls excavated in the heart of London have provided the first gruesome evidence of Roman head hunters operating in Britain, gathering...

Via Joy Kinley
Joshua Lefkowitz's insight:

Humans are the only creatures that kill for any othe reason than survival. Fate has ganted us the ability to understand the universe in a way noe other creature (that we know of) can; and yet we are capable of such cruelty.

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Joy Kinley's curator insight, January 15, 2014 8:52 AM

What does it say about the value of some life if heads were cut off and thrown in an open pit to slowly decompose?

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Forbidden Archeology - Secret Discoveries of Early Man - Full Feature

It's Indiana Jones meets The X-Files in this intriguing program that tackles the age-old question "Where did we come from?" Fascinating viewing! Highly recom...

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Archeology from Space

TED Talks In this short talk, TED Fellow Sarah Parcak introduces the field of "space archeology" -- using satellite images to search for clues to the lost sites of past civilizations.

 

The uses of geospatial technologies is NOT limited to studying geography, but it is the bedrock of many research projects that involve spatial thinking (as demonstrated in this TED talk).  Geographic principles and geographers can be very important  members of interdisciplinary teams.

 

Tags: spatial, remote sensing, geospatial, TED, MiddleEast, historical. 


Via Seth Dixon
Joshua Lefkowitz's insight:

This sounds really intruging to me; I have heard of astroarchiology before in the aplication of finding undiscovered large objects (cities, towns sttlements) by using satellites to map deviations in teh earths surface accurately enough to distingush structures like a building foundation. I just find this sort of thing fascinating. I am still in awe that this dort of thing is possible.

more...
No comment yet.
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Techno Archeology Saving The First Images From The Moon At An Abandoned McDonald’s:

Techno Archeology Saving The First Images From The Moon At An Abandoned McDonald’s: | World Civilizations I | Scoop.it
At an abandoned McDonald's building they are recovering the original images taken by the first lunar orbiter missions.

Via planetMitch
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planetMitch's curator insight, December 15, 2013 7:37 AM

AWESOME! Great story. I am a child of those days (yes, I'm older than most of you LOL). This is great to see that there's a way to recover some of that data. I know a TON of it has been thrown away over the years.


Joshua Lefkowitz's curator insight, January 16, 2014 8:06 PM

The first thing that cought my eye on this article, other than the title, was teh youtube video. I was presented by a famous youtuber who post science and educational videos and he is escellent. This subject is so fitting gor american aerospace engineering. The american space program basically began at teh curious whim of Robert Goddard who thought liquid fueling could be better than solid rocket motors and now here are a bunch of "hobbyists" who have decided to collect what we have learned from the amazin journey. The story has come full circle

Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from All about water, the oceans, environmental issues
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Is a liveaboard scuba diving trip right for you?

Is a liveaboard scuba diving trip right for you? | World Civilizations I | Scoop.it
If you are an avid scuba diver and have experienced diving all over the world, you might be considering a liveaboard scuba diving trip next time around. However, there are a few things you should consider before you book a liveaboard trip.

Via Kathy Dowsett
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10 Philippine Backpacking Routes for Newbies

10 Philippine Backpacking Routes for Newbies | World Civilizations I | Scoop.it
After traveling for almost a decade now (I'm not that old, I just started young) and setting foot on each of the 80 provinces of the Philippines on a budget, I guess it would be of great help to suggest some backpacking routes for those who are...

Via Dave Gatenby
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Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from MOVIES VIDEOS & PICS
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Myths of Mankind: The Mahabharata (Ancient History Documentary)

Myths of Mankind: The Mahabharata (Ancient History Documentary) Maha in Sanskrit means big and bharata refers to the great emperor Bharat, whose empire was k...

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
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Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from Miscellaneous Topics
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Disclosing Knowledge from the Sumerian Tablets

Disclosing Knowledge from the Sumerian Tablets | World Civilizations I | Scoop.it
Sumer is modern day Iraq, loosely translated Sumer stands for "land of the civilized kings" or "native land".

Via David Simpson
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Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from Human Interest
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The Entire History of the World—Really, All of It—Distilled Into a Single Gorgeous Chart

The Entire History of the World—Really, All of It—Distilled Into a Single Gorgeous Chart | World Civilizations I | Scoop.it
This “Histomap,” created by John B. Sparks, was first printed by Rand McNally in 1931. (The David Rumsey Map Collection hosts a fully zoomable version here.)

Via Seth Dixon, Jukka Melaranta
Joshua Lefkowitz's insight:

Often times I find it hard to think of history as simply a recolection of time. Youspend your childhood looking at timelines and learning history linearly you often forget that this is not the case. I found this work to be very asthetically pleasing and helpful as well.

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Greta Brewin's curator insight, October 27, 2013 3:28 AM

This is a 'Histomap' created by John B. Sparks and first published in 1931. It depicts literally all of the world’s history from 2000 BC up until the 1900 AD. This would be great to just have printed out and displayed in your classroom, allowing student to study it as they please. I would have loved to have this to look at during quiet reading back in my day. It really is fascinating and fairly easy to understand. It works as a great visual aid to allow students to understand who had power and to see as it depletes. Although a large part of the historical knowledge shown on the chart is not a part of the Australian Curriculum, having it in the classroom allows students to explore and research these eras of history in their own time. 

Shelby Redman's curator insight, December 2, 2013 2:23 PM

This is really neat

Joshua Lefkowitz's curator insight, January 24, 2014 7:55 PM

Often times I find it hard to think of history as simply a recolection of time. Youspend your childhood looking at timelines and learning history linearly you often forget that this is not the case. I found this work to be very asthetically pleasing and helpful as well.

Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from HDSLR
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Techno Archeology Saving The First Images From The Moon At An Abandoned McDonald’s:

Techno Archeology Saving The First Images From The Moon At An Abandoned McDonald’s: | World Civilizations I | Scoop.it
At an abandoned McDonald's building they are recovering the original images taken by the first lunar orbiter missions.

Via planetMitch
Joshua Lefkowitz's insight:

The first thing that cought my eye on this article, other than the title, was teh youtube video. I was presented by a famous youtuber who post science and educational videos and he is escellent. This subject is so fitting gor american aerospace engineering. The american space program basically began at teh curious whim of Robert Goddard who thought liquid fueling could be better than solid rocket motors and now here are a bunch of "hobbyists" who have decided to collect what we have learned from the amazin journey. The story has come full circle

more...
planetMitch's curator insight, December 15, 2013 7:37 AM

AWESOME! Great story. I am a child of those days (yes, I'm older than most of you LOL). This is great to see that there's a way to recover some of that data. I know a TON of it has been thrown away over the years.


Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from World History - SHS
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Volunteers unearth mass graves of Russia's fallen WWII soldiers - BBC News

Volunteers unearth mass graves of Russia's fallen WWII soldiers - BBC News | World Civilizations I | Scoop.it
BBC News
Volunteers unearth mass graves of Russia's fallen WWII soldiers
BBC News
At the close of the Second World War, around 4 million Soviet soldiers were missing in action.

Via Joy Kinley
Joshua Lefkowitz's insight:

World war two was not all that long ago in the grand scheme of things; it was the first war that was "fully captures on film and there are still some veterans alive today (although thier numbers are dwindelling. I cannot believe something this massive could go unnoted for a half century. I guess this just goes to schow the true scale of the largest war ever fought.

more...
Joy Kinley's curator insight, January 14, 2014 12:08 PM

Russia suffered the most casualtiesof any country involved during WWII.  Often with mass graves it is impossible to verify the people however these soldiers would have some form of ID on them.  Why do you think so many people are volunteering their time and money to bury these soldiers?

Nick Lesley's comment, May 17, 2014 10:08 AM
Russia dealt with alot of suffering after WW2, with all the deaths and what not.... so they had a ton of burying to do.
Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from World History - SHS
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The Archaeology News Network: Qigexing Temple ruins along silk road reveal Buddhism’s past in China

The Archaeology News Network: Qigexing Temple ruins along silk road reveal Buddhism’s past in China | World Civilizations I | Scoop.it

Via John Ward, Joy Kinley
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John Ward's curator insight, January 15, 2014 2:25 AM

Since 2012, archaeologists have been working on a two-year project at the Qigexing Temple ruins in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous region. As an important crossroads on the northern silk road, the site is crucial to study how Buddhism developed in China. 


Joy Kinley's curator insight, January 15, 2014 10:33 AM

Goods and ideas were exchanged along the Silk Road.  Along the way monastaries sprang up for people to learn and share.  As transportation routes shifted many of the sites along the Silk Road fell into dissuse.

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Fabriano, Le Marche in Washington D.C. | the Incredible history of Italian paper in the western world

Fabriano, Le Marche in Washington D.C. | the Incredible history of Italian paper in the western world | World Civilizations I | Scoop.it

Washington, D.C. --- A new exhibition at the Italian Embassy, Fabriano 1264, examines the important role papermaking has played in western history. This exhibition celebrates the 750th anniversary of papermaking in Fabriano, a city in the Marche region of Italy, legendary for its paper production.
During the 13th century, Fabriano became one of the best known papermaking centers in Europe, if not the world. That was even before Columbus discovered America! Today, Fabriano paper is legendary for its use not only in documents, but also for its intricate and historical watermarks and other artwork. [...]


Via Mariano Pallottini
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Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from My Umbrella Cockatoo, TIKI
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▶ THE NEW WORLD ORDER - A 6000 Year History - 2013 HD FEATURE FILM - YouTube

The ODESSA: A Global Nazi Network A secret network of Nazis escaping justice all over the world. Music = Horns Of Destiny by Tim Garland

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
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Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from Archaeology News
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Archeology: First Temple Era reservoir discovered - Israel - ANSAMed.it

Archeology: First Temple Era reservoir discovered - Israel - ANSAMed.it | World Civilizations I | Scoop.it
Archeology: First Temple Era reservoir discovered, Water reservoir at Wailing Wall was for public use, , Israel, Ansa (Archeology: First Temple Era reservoir discovered - Israel - ANSAMed.it http://t.co/mHWt57ND...)...

Via David Connolly
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Joshua Lefkowitz's curator insight, January 16, 2014 7:50 PM

Although well excavated, teh temple mount is an hugely important cultural site for three of the worlds major religions. Despite being farily mundain, I think most people can apreciate knowing a little more about how teh "Acnient" actually lived on a day to day basis.

Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from promienie
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#Archeology Robert Bauval - Exposing the Hawass Scandal - 17 December 2013

http://www.youtube.com/user/JamesSwaggerDotCom http://www.jamesswagger.com/ http://www.newgrangecosmology.com/ http://www.capricornradio.com/ https://www.fac...

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#Archeology Tut-Tut: Did Nat Geo Bribe Egypt’s Famed Indiana Jones?

#Archeology Tut-Tut: Did Nat Geo Bribe Egypt’s Famed Indiana Jones? | World Civilizations I | Scoop.it
Exclusive: US prosecutors have opened a criminal investigation of the National Geographic Society

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Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from ScubaObsessed
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Scuba diving industry supports maintaining moratorium on hunting goliath grouper

Scuba diving industry supports maintaining moratorium on hunting goliath grouper | World Civilizations I | Scoop.it
The Diving Equipment and Marketing Association (DEMA), a non-profit trade organization representing the recreational scuba diving and snorkeling industry, rece

Via Darrin Jillson
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