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Archaeologists enter royal tomb in Palenque : Past Horizons Archaeology

Archaeologists enter royal tomb in Palenque : Past Horizons Archaeology | world civilization second post | Scoop.it

A multidisciplinary team from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) first entered a burial chamber in Temple XX at Palenque in southern Mexico, 13 years ago. The tomb contained the remains of one of the first rulers of the ancient city – K uk Bahlam I - who came to power in 431 AD and founded the dynasty which included the famous Mayan ruler Pakal.


Via David Connolly
Joshua Lefkowitz's insight:

As I said before, much pf what we know about the mesoamerican cultures is rumor, conjecture, hearsay or things we gathered from archaeological sites. As most of the manuscripts from this culture were burned by missionaries a great deal of this amazing culture has been lost. I think this article shows just how little we know about these people.

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Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from Gifts of the Ancients
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Rome.info > Fall of the Roman Empire, decline of ancient Rome

Rome.info > Fall of the Roman Empire, decline of ancient Rome | world civilization second post | Scoop.it
Rome.info - Fall of the Roman Empire, decline of Rome, history of Ancient Rome, reasons for the Fall of Roman Empire, moral decline of Rome,...

Via Barbara Falkinburg
Joshua Lefkowitz's insight:

One always wonders where playwrights, directors and the like come up with their historical fiction plots, when many of these stories can be found, in part, in reality. The story f the rise and fall of Rome is so writing I don't even think someone like Dan Brown could have thought of all the great and terrible things that came from the Romans; technologically, culturally and socially they have done a lot to contribute to how life is today.

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Mario Murakami's curator insight, April 11, 8:51 PM

Some say that the fall of the Roman Empire was due to Christianity. Christianity made people pacifists which  in turn caused the Roman citizens not to fight the Barbarians that overthrew the Empire. Also, money that was spent on churches could have been spent on something else more beneficial for the state.

David Arrieta's curator insight, April 12, 2:49 AM

As stated in the article there were many reasons as to why the Roman Empire fell. Reasons that you would assume to be positive actually ruined everything for Rome. The mentality of the people had changed when they were introduced to christianity, the constant fighting for territory between neighboring cities, and dirty politicians.

David Arrieta's curator insight, April 18, 4:54 PM

In this article it gives in depth reasons why the Roman Empire collapsed. From something specific such as the morality of the city state/cleanliness, to something more broad such as the economy, politics, and military spending.

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Physical Evidence of Early Christianity

Physical Evidence of Early Christianity | world civilization second post | Scoop.it
When studying early Christianity, literature tends to take center stage. Critical editions of texts rule. So much so that knowledge about the physical remains of early Christianity, apart from a fe...

Via Kevin Kaatz
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Constantine the Great - The Roman Emperor Constantine I

Constantine the Great - The Roman Emperor Constantine I | world civilization second post | Scoop.it
Constantine the Great of Constantine I was the first Christian emperor of the the Roman Empire.

Via David Walp
Joshua Lefkowitz's insight:

As one of the more well known leaders of Europe, Constantine was known for uniting the fragmented Roman empire and uniting it (on his death bed) under the banner of a relatively new religion: Christianity.

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Punic Wars

Punic Wars | world civilization second post | Scoop.it
In the three Punic Wars, fought between 264 and 146 B.C., the Roman Empire overcame the rival city-state of Carthage to firmly establish its dominance in the western Mediterranean.

Via Angie Ramirez
Joshua Lefkowitz's insight:

The great Punic wars were some of the most significant wars in Europe, culminating in the nearly successful invasion of Rome by Hannibal and his famous elephants.

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Cindy Garcia's curator insight, November 23, 2013 5:58 AM

In this article, it was about the Famous Punic War. These wars were between the  Roman Empire and Carthage city-state.

Cynia Sapp's curator insight, February 18, 10:45 PM

There were three Punic Wars. The Roman Empire defeated Carthage.

Patrick Kwong's curator insight, March 15, 1:47 PM

It seems that Rome and Spain took over Carthage quite easily, despite Hannibal's efforts.

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What have the Etruscans ever done for us? ~ Roman News and Archeology

What have the Etruscans ever done for us? ~ Roman News and Archeology | world civilization second post | Scoop.it
Imagine having to write about a rock. A simple thing really? Well, no, you aren’t allowed to see the rock. All you are allowed to do is witness the splash and ripples in the pond after the rock’s been thrown in. From the size of the splash, the noise and the resulting ripples you can guess what the rock might look like in terms of size and dimensions. But it’s not the same as holding that rock in your hand. This is an apt metaphor for trying to work out the Etruscans, they were hugely influential and their ripples pulse through Roman culture yet so much of what we’d normally use to define and understand them is absent. We don’t have any Etruscan plays or writings, we rely instead on the reports of others. It’s a delicious mystery.

Via David Connolly, Phil On The Net
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Ancient Greece - History, mythology, art, war, culture, society, and architecture.

Ancient Greece - History, mythology, art, war, culture, society, and architecture. | world civilization second post | Scoop.it
Information Resource on Ancient Greece, history, mythology, art and architecture, olympics, wars, culture and society, playwrights, philosophers, historians, geography and essays etc...

Via Catherine Ingham, Olivia Jane
Joshua Lefkowitz's insight:

I really enjoyed this article, as it gave a fairly brief look at some of what we have been learning about in this class (with respect to ancient Greece) as well as other portions of their history which gives a more macroscopic view which I really enjoy.

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Cindy Garcia's curator insight, November 16, 2013 10:08 AM

in this Scoop it, The information is expanded in sections Their are sujects you may click to receive infroamtion from, some which are Art, culture, society, etc.

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Everyday Life in Ancient Greece, 4th Century BC

Everyday Life in Ancient Greece, 4th Century BC | world civilization second post | Scoop.it
Eye witness account of Ancient Greece...

Via ChrisGibson
Joshua Lefkowitz's insight:

It is undeniable that the lives of the ancient Greeks  were different than that of our own; however the glimpses do help to make their world seem a little less foreign.. As a result people often realize that in some ways they really weren't that different from ourselves.

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Karina Moreno's curator insight, April 11, 8:22 PM

Another reason, why I have always found ancient Greece history fascinating is because they were such well develops cities in their ancient times.  While other cities around them barely had a stable system to run their cities, most of Greece by then has a well establish economy, military, and government.  Investigating artifacts and scrolls has given a small glimpse of their everyday life.  In cities, such as Athens, men were the only citizens while women were not; women were to be at home and bear chidrens.  About a quarter of the population were slaves that were prisoners of war from the battles the city won, and these slaves were the ones that sustain the economy by doing the labor work.  Most of the Greek life were enjoyed by art, philosophy, food, and other entertainment.

Jessica Bowman-Shorter's curator insight, May 2, 5:00 PM

talks about ancient Greek life

Michael Goodson's curator insight, May 16, 5:19 PM

account of what it was like to live in ancient greece during the 4th century

Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from Anthropology, Archaeology, and History
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Sasanika - The History and Culture of Sasanians

Sasanika - The History and Culture of Sasanians | world civilization second post | Scoop.it

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Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from Teaching history and archaeology to kids
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Archaeology News : King Croesus's golden brooch to be returned to ...

Archaeology News : King Croesus's golden brooch to be returned to ... | world civilization second post | Scoop.it
Archaeology Press Releases and Archaeological News : For thousands of years it lay underground, part of the buried treasure of the legendarily wealthy King Croesus. But since being illegally excavated in the ...

Via Louise Zarmati
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Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from Human Rights & Civil Rights & Animal Rights & Global Rights
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History of Natural Law & Basic Freedoms, Cyrus the Great: United for Human Rights

History of Natural Law & Basic Freedoms, Cyrus the Great: United for Human Rights | world civilization second post | Scoop.it
Learn more about human and equal rights history or foundation in the rule of Cyrus the Great of Persia ending slavery, instituting freedom of religion, and stopping racial discrimination in the ancient empire.

Via Dana Hoffman
Joshua Lefkowitz's insight:

Winston Churchill said that "Democracy is the worst form of government, except for all the others..." Obviously democracy has something going for it because the idea has lit the world for over a millennium.

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Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from Libraries and information literacy skills
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Ancient China in Pictures

Ancient China in Pictures | world civilization second post | Scoop.it
Religions in ancient China.

Via Tania Gammage
Joshua Lefkowitz's insight:

I have always enjoyed art and Chinese art , like Japanese and Korean is very simple and intricate in detail. Like most other cultures though the art is not very indicative of daily life.

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Patrick Kwong's curator insight, February 21, 2:16 PM

These pictures of ancient China tell us a lot about their practices such as their trade, mathematics, and hierarchy of authority. But what amazes me is how historians can almost accurately order these chains of events shown in these paintings.

Elizabeth Otis's curator insight, February 21, 8:24 PM

Some of the information that they have on the religions of ancient china is very interesting. 

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Discovering China - The Han Dynasty-China's First Golden Age

The Han Dynasty began in 206 BC when a man named Liu Bang, who had been born a peasant, led a group of generals to overthrow the Qin dynasty. This started a ...

Via Karen Kearney
Joshua Lefkowitz's insight:

I enjoyed this short synapse of this period of time. I didn't realize the religious influences on this period of time.

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Qin Dynasty -- Ancient History Encyclopedia

The Qin dynasty was brief in duration (221-206 BCE) but very important in Chinese history. It followed the Zhou dynasty (1046-256 BCE) and it ended when Liu Bang became the king of Han in 206 BCE (the formal beginning ...

Via Raymond McGee
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Ancient Links: Plumbing and Toilets in Ancient Rome

Ancient Links: Plumbing and Toilets in Ancient Rome | world civilization second post | Scoop.it

Ancient Living - plumbing in ancient Rome


Via Barbara Falkinburg, HGI Middle School Library, claudia patino, elizama ramirez, Raul Banuelos
Joshua Lefkowitz's insight:

I remember hearing somewhere that the Roman are as old to us and the ancient Egyptians are to the Romans. I cannot believe that even that long ago that people had public access to plumbing; not only that but many had it in their homes as well.

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Gabriel Rodriguez's curator insight, March 7, 11:17 PM

it's interesting to think that in ancient times only the rich could have access to toilets. 

Chase Lee's curator insight, March 8, 2:41 AM

Good for them. If that is what they were used for, then good for them. I am a fan of plumbing. When i look at it that's not really what i see. it looks more artistic than practical.

Patrick Kwong's curator insight, March 9, 4:59 AM

The plumbing system in Rome is an extraordinary feature among the many architecture such as aqueducts and roads. The Romans had a “perfected” version of the ancient pipeline, as public toilets and private homes were connected to a main drainage system, which is comparable to our extremely vast pipeline throughout America. It’s impressive that these Romans were so ahead of their time, but unfortunate that only the higher class could be allowed to live …more hygienically, as the poor  would use urine to launder clothes.

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Timeline of Ancient Rome

Timeline of Ancient Rome | world civilization second post | Scoop.it
Timeline of Ancient Rome

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Ignacio Garrido's curator insight, March 25, 2:11 AM

Exercise 24 :

 

This is a very simple exercise. It consists of find the years for the different events of Rome. At the end of the game the screen shows your result and you have to copy this screen ( Function+ Impr Pant or any method you know ) and send it by Moodle. You can play as times as you want and send the best score. Good Luck ¡¡

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Julius Caesar Biography

Julius Caesar Biography | world civilization second post | Scoop.it

"Julius Caesar Biography." Bio.com. Ed. Arnold Joseph Toynbee. A&E Networks Television. Web. 14 Mar. 2012.


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Aaronee's curator insight, March 5, 10:47 PM

Julius Caesar was born in 100 BCE and was also born in Rome. His full name is Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus Augustus. He was assassinated.  

TF Carse's curator insight, April 29, 6:03 AM

This Biography.com Website page lists some biographical background about Caesar as well as a short video about a forensic examination of his death. 

Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from ancient world civilization
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The Fall of the Roman Republic

The Fall of the Roman Republic | world civilization second post | Scoop.it
Explore the fall of the Roman republic. How did Rome turn into an empire under the control of one man - Augustus?

Via kanita kurtovic, Joel Mondragon
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kanita kurtovic's curator insight, November 15, 2013 12:04 PM

This article is important because it gives the history on how the Roman Republic went from a rich and politically strong empire to a poor and falling city. This article deals with Julius Caesar and the threats and challenges he faced with the army. This article also talks about the major battles Julius Caesar had to face alone and his victory at the end.

Joel Mondragon's curator insight, November 23, 2013 12:30 AM

 

This article is very informative in providing details on how a great empire perished. It explains how within the Roman Empire there was a lot of confusion on who should hold power and rule. It also describes flaws with the army which were at war with different adversaries. 

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50 Years In Italy: Sphinxes and Pyramids...of the Etruscans

50 Years In Italy: Sphinxes and Pyramids...of the Etruscans | world civilization second post | Scoop.it

Sphinxes and Pyramids...of the Etruscans

History tells us how the Etruscan civilization was overcome by the Romans as they expanded north from the banks of the Tiber. Here in Etruria or Tuscia, 80 kilometres north of Rome, we can draw lines on the map connecting the towns of Vetralla, Tarquinia and Tuscania to make an “ Etruscan Triangle”.


Via Rene Nieuwenhuizen
Joshua Lefkowitz's insight:

Wow I had never heard of this; although the Romans did incorporate Egyptian architecture into their own buildings(like obelisks) I did not realize that to some extent they emulated them too.

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Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from News in Conservation
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Can Privatization Save the Treasures of Ancient Greece?

Can Privatization Save the Treasures of Ancient Greece? | world civilization second post | Scoop.it
Can Privatization Save the Treasures of Ancient Greece?

Via International Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works
Joshua Lefkowitz's insight:

I think it very sad that such cultural treasures cannot be maintained either through taxes or on their popularity alone. Although if these are here for the foreseeable future and are available for anyone to see (if they want) then I am okay with this.

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Patrick Kwong's curator insight, February 21, 3:33 PM

Stephen Miller is a history nut focused on the preservation of ancient Greece's culture and history, or just culture and history in general. He feels that there should be more investment in private ownership of archaeological and historical sites to promote the value of ancient history.

Gabriel Rodriguez's curator insight, February 21, 10:54 PM

I think it's important to preserve the history of Greece, and the history of the world for that matter.  We shouldn't destroy historical monuments or take over historical land for new age purposes, we should respect that history and leave these locations as they are.

claudia patino's curator insight, February 24, 8:18 PM

The question is to let the private sector take control of the archeology findings because Greece owes money to other countries. No, because the country can increase there ticket sells to museums, and archeological sites. Greece is so rich in history the government needs to use it to its advantage. Greece does get millions of tourist each year.

Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from Life in Ancient Greece
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Facts About Ancient Greece

Facts About Ancient Greece | world civilization second post | Scoop.it

Student have written about Ancient Greece for other students. 


Via Mrs Collins
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Aaronee's curator insight, February 20, 6:29 PM

The first civilization in the Mediterranean area was the Minoan Civilization. The Minoans were very skilled architect and built palaces. Around 1600 B. C. the Mineoans became weak and the Greeks, who were called Mycenaens after their largest city Mycenae, became stronger.

claudia patino's curator insight, February 24, 7:51 PM

Apparently the Greece and Egypt traded frequently. Look sing at a map those two countries had to cross the meditate rain sea. How did these countries discover each other and what they had to trade. I wounded what country travels to the other one first; and if they had different cultural views on the greek gods. 

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Macedonia : Alexander the Great conquers Paris « History Of ...

Macedonia : Alexander the Great conquers Paris « History Of ... | world civilization second post | Scoop.it
http://alexandre-le-grand.louvre.fr/en/. Macedonia News : Videos from the exhibition. Alexander the Great. Με τον Μέγα Αλέξανδρο στο Λούβρο ΕΤ3 ~ Alexander the Great in Louvre Museum ET3. From the YouTube channel of ...

Via Panayiotis
Joshua Lefkowitz's insight:

Alexander The Great is probably one of the most famous people on earth; his influence on ancient history is only rivaled by people like Genghis Khan, Hannibal, Sun Tzu, etc.  

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Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from Anthropology and Archaeology
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Archaeology: Ancient Lost Army Found? : Video : Discovery News

Archaeology: Ancient Lost Army Found? : Video : Discovery News | world civilization second post | Scoop.it
Has the lost army of Cambyses II been found? The Persian army of 50,000 soldiers supposedly perished in a sandstorm in ancient Egypt 2500 years ago.

Via Kyle Kunkel O'Connor
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Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from encyclopedia
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Mycenae | What is Encyclopedia

Mycenae is an ancient city-state located in Greece on the Peloponnese Peninsula, upon a hilltop on the lower slopes of the Euboea Mountains, between two of its (Mycenae Mycenae is an ancient city-state located in Greece on the Peloponnese Peninsula,...

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Rescooped by Joshua Lefkowitz from Special Collections Librarianship
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The Production and Circulation of Printed Books in the Occident and Orient from the Accession of the Tang Dynasty (c.618) - British Academy

The Production and Circulation of Printed Books in the Occident and Orient from the Accession of the Tang Dynasty (c.618) - British Academy | world civilization second post | Scoop.it

The Production and Circulation of Printed Books in the Occident and Orient from the Accession of the Tang Dynasty (c.618) to the First Industrial Revolution
Thursday & Friday, 14 & 15 February 2013
Venue: The British Academy

 

 


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Katie Birkwood's curator insight, January 19, 2013 1:03 PM

This conference aims to open the conversation between economic historians and historians of the book and stimulate publications and research in a truly global history of knowledge formation from the Tang Dynasty to the Industrial Revolution. 

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Qin Shi Huang - The First Emperor That United China - China Culture - China culture

Qin Shi Huang - The First Emperor That United China - China Culture - China culture | world civilization second post | Scoop.it
Ying Zheng, the first emperor that united China over 2000 years ago, declared himself Shi Huangdi, meaning the first emperor. He was called

Via Tania Gammage
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