The Persians
Follow
Find
71 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from Current Events and History
onto The Persians
Scoop.it!

One of the First Known Chemical Attacks Took Place 1,700 Years Ago in Syria

One of the First Known Chemical Attacks Took Place 1,700 Years Ago in Syria | The Persians | Scoop.it
Sasanian Persians gassed at least 19 Romans by adding sulfur crystals and bitumen to fire in 256 CE

Via Rod Powell
Andreina Ruiz's insight:

It is discovered around 1,700 years ago, Syria was site to one of the first chemical gas attacks known in history. An archaeologist found traces of yellow sulfur crystals and pitch near a pile of bodies that were Roman soldiers who had died in the battle.

more...
JERRY KITH's curator insight, February 26, 2014 10:12 PM

Persians were the first civilization to commit chemical warfare 1700 yrs ago. 

Elizabeth Otis's curator insight, February 27, 2014 6:27 PM

This just shows you how powerful and smart the Persians were during this time. It still amazes me the kinds of things we discover over time. 

Andrea Arminguay's curator insight, March 1, 2014 1:14 AM

it is interesting to know that the persians gassed the Romans by adding sulfur crystals being these ancient times. They must have known very good techniques for making these gas weapons.

From around the web

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from Bible News
Scoop.it!

The importance of the Cyrus cylinder

The importance of the Cyrus cylinder | The Persians | Scoop.it

A baked clay cylinder from two and half millennia ago could very well be one of the most influential objects of the last few millennia. Written in Babylonian cuneiform script, the “Cyrus Cylinder” originally recounts how Cyrus, the king of the Persians, invaded, destroyed, and liberated Babylon. This the region we now call the Middle East with Persia now being what we call Iran, and Babylon being what we call Iraq.


Neil MacGregor in the TED Talk below explains how this Cylinder is so much more than just a document of history. It was the first real press release of humankind! It’s a declaration by Cyrus that he would release the Jews, and all the other oppressed people in Babylon, allowing them to return to their homelands, and allowing them to have their faith and worship their own gods. For 200 years, Cyrus led a stable empire that was the first multi-racial, multi-faith, and multi-cultural society to have ever existed. The Near East (what we now call the Middle East) became a thriving international hub, a melting pot of cultures: it was the first spark of globalism.


Via Rob J Hyndman
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from Alexander the Great
Scoop.it!

Ancient Macedonia - Prophecies about Greeks conquering the Persian

Ancient Macedonia - Prophecies about Greeks conquering the Persian | The Persians | Scoop.it
Ancient Macedonia - During Alexander's Pan-Hellenic Campaign in Asia, ancient sources occasionally mention prophecies which foretell the defeat of Persians by the Greeks.

Via Panayiotis
more...
Elizabeth Otis's curator insight, February 27, 2014 6:30 PM

It is not surprising that people predicted the fall of Persia. Even in the Bible you had prophets predicting the fall of the Persian empire. 

Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from filological issues
Scoop.it!

Engineering an Empire - The Persians - Part 1of5

The Persian Empire was one of the most mysterious civilizations in the ancient world. Persia became an empire under the Cyrus the Great, who created a policy...

Via Athina Kmn
more...
Mark Townsend's curator insight, February 26, 2014 2:29 PM

This is a modern day introduction of how the empires in Persia were believed to be constructed. The is one out of the five videos dedicated to this topic. In this video, we get a brief tour and description of the Persian empire, a great way to get a perspective of their culture and lifestyle.

JERRY KITH's curator insight, February 26, 2014 10:18 PM

A tale on the ancient persians clever engineering capabilities. 

Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from Ancient Crimes
Scoop.it!

Sport in Ancient China | The World of Chinese

Sport in Ancient China | The World of Chinese | The Persians | Scoop.it
A variety of sports was played in ancient China and each had particular rules and regulations. As well as this, sports also played a role in the lives of the people who participated.

Via Ms Webster, Charlie Wittke
Andreina Ruiz's insight:

The popular sports that were played in Ancient China was swordplay, archery, polo, golf, ice-skating, and football. I would have not imagine that golf was part of the Ancient China. However, it is said that it was part of worrier's art.

more...
JERRY KITH's curator insight, February 23, 2014 8:32 PM

Ancient chinese version of the olympics

Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from Ancient China MS80x
Scoop.it!

Crafts and Artisans of ancient China

Crafts and Artisans of ancient China | The Persians | Scoop.it

"Jade and bronze were the most prized materials in Ancient China. Jade was believed to have magical properties and to preserve the dead. "


Via ChrisGibson
Andreina Ruiz's insight:

Jade and bronze were important and popular materials in Ancient China. Who would have thought that Jade was used to preserve the dead. As for bronze, it was used to make weapons, ritual vessels, pots, bells, and mirrors.

more...
Charlie Wittke's curator insight, February 13, 2014 7:24 PM

The reason Jade was and still is so popular in China is because the Chinese believe it had magical properties and that it preserved the dead. The silk the Chinese made was so popular but its production was kept a secret for a very long time.

Elizabeth Otis's curator insight, February 21, 2014 8:29 PM

This explains why so many things were made out of jade in ancient china. 

Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from The Mayans and 2012
Scoop.it!

Tracing the Footsteps of the Mayans - The Epoch Times

Tracing the Footsteps of the Mayans - The Epoch Times | The Persians | Scoop.it

Tracing the Footsteps of the Mayans The Epoch Times I have seen the gladiators' arena in the Coliseum in Rome; I stood where the Colossus of Rhodes towered over the Greek island; I have walked amongst the shrines and temples in Kyoto, Japan; and...


Via SD Craig
Andreina Ruiz's insight:

Chichen Itza is one of Mexico's most popular tourist destinations located in Yucatan Peninsula. The first pyramid you see when you walk in is the Temple of Kulkulkan,  also known as El Castillo. I actually had the chance to visit this place last year. It was amazing! I was told that during the fall and spring equinoxes a fascinating display of mathematical and archeological advancement could be observed, which a shadow falls on the pyramid in the shape of a serpent. As the sun sets, this shadowy snake descends the steps to eventually join a stone serpent head at the base of the great staircase up the pyramid’s side. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from The Mayans and 2012
Scoop.it!

The Mayans: Origin and Prevalence

The Mayans: Origin and Prevalence | The Persians | Scoop.it

Mayan Indians of Central America and Mexico, also called 'Maia' or 'Maya' is an ancient civilization that settled in parts of Central America, namely. ... Navigate to, About, Contact Us. Home » Mayan Calendar 2012 ...


Via SD Craig
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from Grade 8 Social Studies
Scoop.it!

Top 10 Fascinating Facts About The Mayans

Top 10 Fascinating Facts About The Mayans | The Persians | Scoop.it
The Maya is a Mesoamerican civilization, noted for the only known fully developed written language of the pre-Columbian Americas, as well as its art, architecture, and mathematical and astronomical systems.

Via Paul Harland
Andreina Ruiz's insight:

It is amazing to know that are numerous Mayans still living in their home regions. When I went to Yucatan to visit the pyramids, there were so many mayans selling their cultural products and living in some areas. It was like a jungle. It was sad but it was interesting to see how they survive in life. 

more...
Rowena ButedHIST1014's curator insight, February 14, 2014 11:58 PM

10 facts about the Mayans that we didn't know! It said that a few of the Mayans still live in their home regions. It also said that a ritual that parents did was flatten the forehead of the babies faces and also crossed the eyes of the babies. Some interesting things!

Elizabeth Otis's curator insight, February 27, 2014 6:36 PM

These are some very interesting facts in this article. The one I found really weird is that they tried to cross children's eyes. Why would they do that?

Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
Scoop.it!

Revealing India and Pakistan’s Ancient Art and Inventions

Revealing India and Pakistan’s Ancient Art and Inventions | The Persians | Scoop.it

China, Egypt, Mesopotamia, Maya--these are ancient civilizations people tend to know something about. The Harappan civilization of the Indus Valley, on the other hand, is maybe less well known, but just as fascinating and inspiring for us today.


Via Sharrock
Andreina Ruiz's insight:

Harappan was not known until the 1920s. It is one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of the 20th century. One of the things the people from Harappan began was the food production instead of the food gathering.

more...
Yangchen Lhamo's curator insight, February 6, 2014 3:24 PM

Out of 2,000 Harappan sites, only 5 of them have been discovered. 

Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from Plant Based Nutrition
Scoop.it!

Sudden collapse of Harappan civilization may foreshadow superbug threat to modern humans

Sudden collapse of Harappan civilization may foreshadow superbug threat to modern humans | The Persians | Scoop.it
Sudden collapse of Harappan civilization may foreshadow superbug threat to modern humans

Via Skip Stein
more...
Skip Stein's curator insight, February 3, 2014 8:37 AM

Keep in mind that it's not just these 'super bugs' created by over use of antibiotics, it is also SUPERBUGS created by over use of pesticides and GMO crops.  Resistant strains of plant eating bugs, fungus and other critters have been created by Natural Selection to resist the pesticide laden crops creating a whole rash of superbugs that could threaten agriculture across the planet.  This issue is a double edged sword created by power hungry/greedy corporations that seek to control the Planet and their equally corrupt partners in various governments (bought and paid for politicians!).

Charlie Wittke's curator insight, February 6, 2014 4:38 PM

This article directly blames disease on the collapse of the Harappan civilization and suggest that that same disease may infect humans today.

nabin bhusal's curator insight, February 6, 2014 11:50 PM

I dont think any living being can stay forever in earth. As we see the dinosaurs had ruled the earth millions of years and eventually they came to an extinct. likewise Harappan civilization has collapsed. all the thing are changing continuously and its just matter of time.

Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from Ancient Egypt and Nubia
Scoop.it!

Satirical criticism is Pharaonic heritage: Archaeologist | Egypt Independent

Satirical criticism is Pharaonic heritage: Archaeologist | Egypt Independent | The Persians | Scoop.it
Pharaonic rulers of Egypt were subjected to satirical criticism using words and pictures, according to Archaeologist Ahmed Salah, the head of Abu Simbel area antiquities. The expression of opinion was an integral part of the ancient Egyptians culture,...

Via Shonda Brock
Andreina Ruiz's insight:

It seems that there is always a conflict between the ruler and the people. But I do support the people because they have the right to have better lives. Egyptians were the first to use demonstrations, strikes, and sit-ins as a way for protest.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from The Related Researches & News of Dr John Ward
Scoop.it!

The Archaeology News Network: New findings at Egypt's Giza Plateau

The Archaeology News Network: New findings at Egypt's Giza Plateau | The Persians | Scoop.it

Via John Ward
Andreina Ruiz's insight:

It is interesting to discover a house that held at least 21 rooms. It is believed to be part of a city that was built a little bit after the pyramid of Menkaure (teh last of the Giza Pyramids). Also it is amazing that bones from young cattle and teeth from leopards were found and it is suggested by archaeologists that its residents ate and dressed like royalty.

more...
John Ward's curator insight, January 23, 2014 2:53 AM

The remains of a mansion that likely held high-ranking officials some 4,500 years ago have been discovered near Egypt's Giza Pyramids. Bones from young cattle and teeth from leopards suggest its residents ate and dressed like royalty. 


Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from Mesopotamia
Scoop.it!

Mesopotamia at mrdowling.com

Mesopotamia at mrdowling.com | The Persians | Scoop.it
The Fertile Crescent has been home to various civilizations for over five thousand years.

Via ChrisGibson
Andreina Ruiz's insight:

It is hard to believe that there are humans that have many many years traveling in search of a home where they can have access to food and safety. These people are known as nomads. It is a family group of about 10 adults and children that travel that stays at one area to another for few weeks or months. It is interesting to know that the Mesopotamia is a land rich of nutrients.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from Early Western Civilization
Scoop.it!

Persian Wars

Persian Wars | The Persians | Scoop.it
Intro:
The Persians wars were a series of battles fought between Ancient Greece and Persia. For an introduction Greece and Persia were both ancient civilizations.

Via David Walp
Andreina Ruiz's insight:

The Persians wars were a series of battles fought between Ancient Greece and Persia. There are many causes of the Persian wars. One of them was that Persians wanted to rule Greece.

more...
abigail's curator insight, November 16, 2013 2:39 AM

the fact that being a controversial conflict is what makes it all that better .. to believe who had the win in the persian and greek war .. is almost unpredictable becasue persia was a great empire compaared to greece but like the quote says it's not that size of the dog in a fight but the size of the fight in a dog.

Elizabeth Otis's curator insight, February 27, 2014 6:23 PM

I like how they explain the war and how it started. These were two powerhouses of the old world. 

Andrea Arminguay's curator insight, March 1, 2014 1:10 AM

this is an interesting one because it explains all the persian wars and why they happened. I think the persians and greeks are two ancient cultures that now are somewhat mixed

Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from Current Events and History
Scoop.it!

One of the First Known Chemical Attacks Took Place 1,700 Years Ago in Syria

One of the First Known Chemical Attacks Took Place 1,700 Years Ago in Syria | The Persians | Scoop.it
Sasanian Persians gassed at least 19 Romans by adding sulfur crystals and bitumen to fire in 256 CE

Via Rod Powell
Andreina Ruiz's insight:

It is discovered around 1,700 years ago, Syria was site to one of the first chemical gas attacks known in history. An archaeologist found traces of yellow sulfur crystals and pitch near a pile of bodies that were Roman soldiers who had died in the battle.

more...
JERRY KITH's curator insight, February 26, 2014 10:12 PM

Persians were the first civilization to commit chemical warfare 1700 yrs ago. 

Elizabeth Otis's curator insight, February 27, 2014 6:27 PM

This just shows you how powerful and smart the Persians were during this time. It still amazes me the kinds of things we discover over time. 

Andrea Arminguay's curator insight, March 1, 2014 1:14 AM

it is interesting to know that the persians gassed the Romans by adding sulfur crystals being these ancient times. They must have known very good techniques for making these gas weapons.

Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from Ancient China for Year 7
Scoop.it!

Chinese History at mrdowling.com

Chinese History at mrdowling.com | The Persians | Scoop.it
Introduction to the Dynasties of Ancient China. Shang, Chou, Han, Manchu, Age of Warring Staes and Confucius included. Designed for students.

Via Helen Kingston-McAllister, TLHelp
Andreina Ruiz's insight:

From at least 1766BC to the twentieth century of the Common Era, China was ruled by dynasties. It is said that the Shang Dynasty was the first dynasty to leave written records.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from Ancient China
Scoop.it!

Ancient tombs discovered in China - Business Standard

Ancient tombs discovered in China
Business Standard
Archaeologists have unearthed about 300 pieces of cultural relics from a cluster of ancient tombs in north China's Hebei Province.

Via Aleeza David
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from Libraries and information literacy skills
Scoop.it!

Ancient China in Pictures

Ancient China in Pictures | The Persians | Scoop.it
Religions in ancient China.

Via Tania Gammage
more...
Patrick Kwong's curator insight, February 21, 2014 2:16 PM

These pictures of ancient China tell us a lot about their practices such as their trade, mathematics, and hierarchy of authority. But what amazes me is how historians can almost accurately order these chains of events shown in these paintings.

Joshua Lefkowitz's curator insight, February 21, 2014 7:45 PM

I have always enjoyed art and Chinese art , like Japanese and Korean is very simple and intricate in detail. Like most other cultures though the art is not very indicative of daily life.

Elizabeth Otis's curator insight, February 21, 2014 8:24 PM

Some of the information that they have on the religions of ancient china is very interesting. 

Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from Ancient World
Scoop.it!

Brazil Weird News: Cenotes - The sacred Wells of the Mayans

Brazil Weird News: Cenotes - The sacred Wells of the Mayans | The Persians | Scoop.it
BWN, 02/06/2012. CENTRAL AMERICA. CENOTES. The sacred Wells of the Mayans | http://t.co/KjZonrbBPL | http://t.co/bfts1NDfVF

Via Rocio Rodriguez
Andreina Ruiz's insight:

These sacred wells of the Mayans, known as Cenotes are very beautiful. They are considered sacred places because in these caves and waters are made millenar rituals. These caves are also sacred to archaeologists. I entered one in Yucatan and I even got inside the water. The water was very cold and there were fishes as well. I was told that people that go inside to get wet are considered to live longer. It was a great experience to be part of because it has been crossed 14,000 years of history of the Maya.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from LibertyE Global Renaissance
Scoop.it!

Did Climate Change Kill the Mayans?

Did Climate Change Kill the Mayans? | The Persians | Scoop.it
A familiar modern problem may have wiped out a grand ancient culture (Did Climate Change Kill the Mayans?

Via Erskine S.Weekes-Libert
Andreina Ruiz's insight:

This is the  interior of Yok Balum cave in Belize, where scientists harvested a telltale stalagmite. The arc of the Mayan rise and fall is well known and people have different reasons for the cause of their decline. But I do believe that the climate change was a huge cause of the Mayans disappearance. 

more...
Elizabeth Otis's curator insight, February 27, 2014 6:34 PM

It is certainly possible that the Mayans were killed because of climate change. The lack of rainfall they probably thought they had angered the gods and stayed thinking they can get back into the gods favor somehow. 

Scooped by Andreina Ruiz
Scoop.it!

New evidence shows Harappan civilization not as peaceful as popularly thought

New evidence shows Harappan civilization not as peaceful as popularly thought | The Persians | Scoop.it
They lived in well-planned cities, made exquisite jewelry, and enjoyed the ancient world's best plumbing.
Andreina Ruiz's insight:

Although the hindus civilization had accomplished great things, researchers have found human bones. The hindus region is discovered to be the level of violence. 

more...
Charlie Wittke's curator insight, February 6, 2014 4:43 PM

This sort of goes without saying, but this article gives evidence was a rather violent society and not the peaceful kind everyone thought it was.

Chase Lee's curator insight, February 8, 2014 1:29 AM

Apparently people were migrating from outside their major cities, into the cities. And in Harappan society women were powerful.Through studying the skeletons of the population they discovered that the Harappans were more violent then other civilizations in different arts of the world at that time.

Cynthia Munoz's curator insight, May 3, 2014 5:24 AM

Interesting content that gives a picture on how the Harappan civilization lives and what their cities looked like.

Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from Miscellaneous Topics
Scoop.it!

Study Sheds More Light on Collapse of Harappan Civilization | Archaeology | Sci-News.com

Study Sheds More Light on Collapse of Harappan Civilization | Archaeology | Sci-News.com | The Persians | Scoop.it
Climate change, violence and disease played a key role in the collapse of the Harappan civilization more than 3,000 years ago, according to a new study.

Via David Simpson
Andreina Ruiz's insight:

Climate, economic, and social changes all played a role in the process of urbanization and collapse of the Harappan civilization. However, these changes affected the human population. Experts found evidence of trauma and infectious diseases like leprosy and tuberculosis in the human skeletal remains.

more...
Yangchen Lhamo's curator insight, February 6, 2014 3:19 PM

One of the reasons for collapse of Harappan Civilization was due to infectious disease. From a sample of 10 crania preserved, it showed that more than 20 percent were infected with leprosy. 

Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from Ancient India
Scoop.it!

Harappan civilization in India - History for Kids!

Harappan civilization in India - History for Kids! | The Persians | Scoop.it
Harappan civilization in India for Kids...

Via ChrisGibson
more...
Aaronee's curator insight, February 4, 2014 5:45 PM

40,000 years the first people from Africa reached India. They started farming by 2500 BC and settled in the Indus river valley. People think they started to farm becuase the gradual warming trend made it very hard for them to get water and it was hard to find wild plants. 

Charlie Wittke's curator insight, February 6, 2014 4:21 PM

This children's history site claims that this society was one of the more advanced at its time. They farmed, they irrigated, and they made cities when it got overpopulated.

Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from Archaeology
Scoop.it!

Polish researcher changes the dating of the famous Egyptian necropolis

Polish researcher changes the dating of the famous Egyptian necropolis | The Persians | Scoop.it

Royal cemetery in Meidum developed continuously at least until the late New Kingdom period, the end of the second millennium BC, determined Dr. Teodozja Rzeuska, archaeologist at the Institute of Mediterranean and Oriental Culture PAS. Until now, Egyptologists believed that the dead had been buried there only in times of the builders of the pyramids, in the third millennium BC.


Via Rene Nieuwenhuizen
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Andreina Ruiz from Beautiful Egypt Pyramids
Scoop.it!

Egypt Travel Experts

http://www.ask-aladdin.com/ Ask Aladdin has everything anyone planning a trip to Egypt could possibly wish for. Advising visitors on eveything from visa info...

Via Egypt Travel Experts
more...
No comment yet.