HSIE K-6 World Achievements by Australians, Past and Present
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Australian of the Year Awards

Australian of the Year Awards | HSIE K-6 World Achievements by Australians, Past and Present | Scoop.it

An interactive resource from the Australian of the Year Awards website that enables the viewing of the recipients of the awards from its conception in 1960 through the present, as well as providing snippets of information about each recipient.

Timothy Joel Dagwell's insight:

Research on the internet has yielded a huge potential source of improved resources, including unprecedented access to archive material, like this one from the Australian of the Year Awards website (Ruthven, Hennessy & Deaney, 2005, p. 2).

 

"Each year our nation celebrates the achievement and contribution of eminent Australians through the Australian of the Year Awards by profiling leading citizens who are role models for us all. They inspire us through their achievements and challenge us to make our own contribution to creating a better Australia." (Australian of the Year Awards; AOTYA; 2014, para. 1)

 

This is a fairly interactive resource that allows students to view the recipients of the Australian of the Year Awards from its conception in 1960 through to the present. Furthermore, it provides students with snippets of information about each recipient and their achievements, citizenship and contribution to both the local community and the global community (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, p. 185).

 

Much like the Australians at War resource, there are several avenues down which teachers could have their students tread while using this resource. One example of a lesson is to have students split into small groups of about two or three and use the resource to find a small number of Australian of the Year Award recipients and write a short fact sheet on each. Students could then leave their original groups and form some "expert groups" with students who looked at other recipients.

 

References:

Board of Studies NSW (1998). Human Society and its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Retrieved from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/go/hsie/


Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment. (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

Ruthven, K., Hennessy, S., & Deaney, R. (2005). Incorporating Internet resources into classroom practice: pedagogical perspectives and strategies of secondary-school subject teachers. Computers & Education, 44, 1-34.

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Australians At War

Australians At War | HSIE K-6 World Achievements by Australians, Past and Present | Scoop.it

Australians at War is  a website designed to complement the Australians at War TV series, and is dedicated to those Australians who served their nation over the past one hundred years.

Timothy Joel Dagwell's insight:

During World War II, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill said these famous words, “Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.” Though the means, and often the ends too, of war are tragic, this quote rings very true for us today who live in the freedom given to us by the  few who have laid down their lives for their nation.

 

This resource is a highly interactive one, which was made to compliment the Australians at War TV series and is dedicated to those who served their nation of the past one hundred years. There is a clear link here, then, between this resource and the subject matter "world achievements by Australians, past and present" of outcome CCS3.1 of the Human Society & its Environment K-6 Syllabus (Board of Studies NSW, 1998, pp. 59-60).

 

When speaking about the nature and purpose of ICT resources, Gilbert and Hoepper (2011, p. 181) argue that though new technologies can make a substantial contribution to teaching and learning, they must be used judiciously and imaginatively if this potential contribution is to be realised. In light of this argument, one idea for the use of this resource is to split students into small groups of approximately two to three students and have each group investigate a different aspect of the content in the resource (e.g. different years, different people, etc.). Then, after the investigation is complete, have the groups form "expert groups" with students from other groups and share what they have learned.

 

References:

Board of Studies NSW (1998). Human Society and its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Retrieved fromhttp://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/go/hsie/

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment. (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Mabo - ABC TV

Mabo - ABC TV | HSIE K-6 World Achievements by Australians, Past and Present | Scoop.it

An informative classroom resource that will enhance an understanding and appreciation of the significance of Eddie Koiki Mabo's victory in the Australian High Court in Australia's history. This resource has an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspective.

Timothy Joel Dagwell's insight:

"No lies are as potent as the lies we tell about land and people. Because they justify or deny the access of individuals - and indeed of entire societies - to acres and resources, they often take on a legal status. Australia's founding lie was as wide and all encompassing as the continent itself: terra nullius, the myth of the empty land, whose Aboriginal inhabitants of some 47,000 years tenure had, under British law, no rights to their country whatever." (Flannery, 2003, p. 4)

 

Many Australians have achieved many great things, but few have achieved something of as much significance as Eddie Koiki Mabo of Mer (Murray Island). His campaign for the land rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, which ultimately ended, though mere months after his passing, in the overturning of the doctrine of terra nullius, has led to "subtle shifts of public attitude" and the draining of power of the lie of terra nullius (Flannery, 2003, p. 5). If there are any Australians who have achieved something of worldly merit, Eddie Koiki Mabo, is surely among them and, hence, there a few Australians more worth learning about in schools.

 

Though this resource has been designed for Secondary students, there is ample room for teachers to manipulate and use it in such a way that students in stage 3 would understand further and appreciate more the significance of Eddie Koiki Mabo's victory in the Australian High Court in Australia's history. Furthermore, this resource soundly addresses the subject matter "world achievements by Australians, past and present" of outcome CCS3.1 of the Human Society & its Environment K-6 Syllabus (Board of Studies NSW, 1998, pp. 59-60).

 

The resource includes links to clips of the 2012 film adaptation of the historical story of Mabo, teacher notes, student notes, interactive quizes, historical timelines and more. This resource may provide the teacher with content for a single lesson, or may also provide the teacher with a foundation for a unit of work. Furthermore, there are clear links to other Key Learning Areas like Creative Arts and English.

 

References:

Board of Studies NSW (1998). Human Society and its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Retrieved from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/go/hsie/

 

Flannery, T. (2003). Quarterly Essay 9 Beautiful Lies: Population and Environment in Australia. Australia: Morry Schwartz.

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Catherine Freeman | Episode 1 | Season 1 | Who Do You Think You Are on SBS

Catherine Freeman | Episode 1 | Season 1 | Who Do You Think You Are on SBS | HSIE K-6 World Achievements by Australians, Past and Present | Scoop.it

From the Australian documentary series "Who Do You Think You Are?", aired on SBS, this episode centres on the famous Australian athlete Cathy Freeman as she discusses her Athletic success and goes in search of her family history. This resource has an Aboriginal an Torres Strait Islander perspective.

Timothy Joel Dagwell's insight:

This resource comes from the Australian documentary series "Who Do You Think You Are?" and centres on the famous Australian athlete Cathy Freeman (go here to watch the episode: http://www.sbs.com.au/ondemand/video/11731011530/Who-Do-You-Think-You-Are-S1-Ep4-Catherine-Freeman). This is an interesting resource because not only does it outline some of the world achievements by one of Australia's most successful athletes, it also explores her past. Cathy Freeman was the first Aboriginal Australian to win a gold medal at an international athletics event. As seen in the video, her heritage as an Aboriginal Australian significantly shaped her life, and her success as an athlete. This resource strongly links not just to the subject matter "world achievements by Australians, past and present" of outcome CCS3.1 of the Human Society & Its Environment K-6 Syllabus (HSIE K-6; Board of Studies NSW; BOS NSW; 1998, pp. 59-60), but also to the outcome itself.

 

The link this resource, and Cathy Freeman herself, has to the syllabus outcome CCS3.1 is twofold. CCS3.1 states, "Explains the significance of particular people, places, groups, actions and events in the past in developing Australian identities and heritage" (HSIE K-6, BOS NSW, 1998, p. 59). Not only has Cathy Freeman had a significant role in developing Australian identity and heritage, but certain people, places, groups, actions and events in the past have significantly developed her Australian identity and heritage.

 

This resource could be used in a variety of ways in the classroom by the teacher for their students. It could be used as an introduction to a series of inquiry based lessons on the world achievements of Australians, it could be used as a window into a unit of work on Cathy Freeman, or it could be linked to other Key Learning Areas like PDHPE.

 

References:

Board of Studies NSW (1998). Human Society and its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Retrieved from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/go/hsie/

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Meet Fred Hollows - YouTube

This video introduces Doctor Fred Hollows, an Australian who spent the majority of his life fighting to end avoidable blindness, both in Australia and abroad. This resource has a global perspective.

Timothy Joel Dagwell's insight:

Doctor Fred Hollows, the 1990 Australian of the Year received worldwide acclaim for his work in treating avoidable blindness in Australia and overseas. "When he died in 1993, he left behind a foundation that continues his work around the world today." (Australian Government, 2007, para. 1). This video gives a summary of his life, work and legacy and is a great starting point for a lesson, or a series of lessons revolving around the eye doctor.

 

There is much room for this resource to be used as a starter for, a catalyst in, or even the focal point of a lesson on the subject matter "world achievements by Australians, past and present" of outcome CCS3.1 of the Human Society & its Environment K-6 Syllabus (Board of Studies NSW, 1998, pp. 59-60).

 

Gilbert and Hoepper (2011) provide some wonderful food for thought on how ICT resources like this video might be used effectively in the classroom. They state, "The classroom provides the means whereby students can explore what it means to be a 'good' citizen, along with the question of describing the realm a citizen occupies, and what that means locally and globally (or 'glocally'). Questions such as the following can promote higher order thinking and critical analysis regarding citizenship:

 

1. What does it mean to be a good citizen?

2. How should a citizen act or operate?

3. Why should we be socially responsible and improve the way we and others live?

4. What examples of socially responsible interactions can we gather to demonstrate exemplars of citizenship?" (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, pp. 184-185). 

 

References:

Australian Government (2007). Fred Hollows. Retrieved April 4, 2014 from http://australia.gov.au/about-australia/australian-story/fred-hollows

 

Board of Studies NSW (1998). Human Society and its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Retrieved fromhttp://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/go/hsie/

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment. (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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