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Things that matter: work, life, purpose and fulfilment
Curated by Josie Gibson
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Building a Storytelling Culture

Building a Storytelling Culture | WorkLife | Scoop.it

A vibrant storytelling culture means the difference between whether your organization has a living, breathing portfolio of different stories, from different perspectives, that share its impact—or just a single, somewhat stagnant story. It’s the difference between having one person in the organization dedicated to storytelling (whether that’s the CEO, development director, or head of communications) and everyone in the organization having compelling stories at their fingertips. And for many organizations, it’s the difference between investing in telling the organization’s story in a more compelling way—or not investing.

 


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
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Dheeraj Gulia's comment, December 2, 4:12 AM
http://tinyurl.com/m9f7tkw
Michael Williams StoryCoaching's curator insight, December 5, 6:56 AM

A storytelling culture creates a healthy organisation. Julie Dixon's work is well-researched and useful to anyone working to improve organisational health.

Birgit Plange's curator insight, December 5, 7:49 AM

…and we are paid storytellers. We need testimonials, good AND short ones. Thats what people remember most. and an one very important point how my husband and I build our business.

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Centered leadership: How talented women thrive | McKinsey & Company

Centered leadership: How talented women thrive | McKinsey & Company | WorkLife | Scoop.it

Women start careers in business and other professions with the same level of intelligence, education, and commitment as men. Yet comparatively few reach the top echelons. This gap matters not only because the familiar glass ceiling is unfair, but also because the world has an increasingly urgent need for more leaders. All men and women with the brains, the desire, and the perseverance to lead should be encouraged to fulfill their potential and leave their mark.

Josie Gibson's insight:
An old article on a useful topic - centred leadership.
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What Maslow’s Hierarchy Won’t Tell You About Motivation

What Maslow’s Hierarchy Won’t Tell You About Motivation | WorkLife | Scoop.it

Despite the popularity of Maslow’s Hierarchy, there is not much recent data to support it. Contemporary science — specifically Dr. Edward Deci, hundreds of Self-Determination Theory researchers, and thousands of studies — instead points to three universal psychological needs. If you really want to advantage of this new science – rather than focusing on a pyramid of needs – you should focus on: autonomy, relatedness, and competence.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Steve Bax's curator insight, November 27, 10:58 AM

An interesting viewpoint on Maslow scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen. The core principles of Maslow's Hierarchy remain both valid and important for leaders to understand in addition to this, in my view. .  

Lauran Star's curator insight, November 28, 4:06 PM

Understanding what motivates you brings greater success!

 

Sue Gaardboe's curator insight, November 28, 4:55 PM

This struck such a cord with me.  I can pin point the moment when I recognised that my life was my responsibility, and can see the energy that flowed from that realisation and how it's influenced every decision and action in my life. We introduce the idea to our students in a general way, (Why is it your Mum's fault that you left your homework at home?Isn't it your responsibility?) but certainly don't help them to appreciate it deeply in their lives.

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The Best Look for a Leader: Intelligent or Healthy? — PsyBlog

The Best Look for a Leader: Intelligent or Healthy? — PsyBlog | WorkLife | Scoop.it

When choosing a leader, people prefer a healthy complexion, but mostly ignore the appearance of intelligence, a new study finds. The findings are based on a Dutch-led study, which looked at the unconscious influence of facial appearance on which leaders people choose for different sorts of leadership.

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A List of Goals Is Not a Strategy

Let’s say you’re getting together with other managers and employees to develop your organization’s or unit’s strategy. No matter how much discussion and enthusiasm you bring to the task, you’re likely to emerge with a list that looks like this:

GrowthSuperior operational outcomes through efficient work practicesBecoming competitive in an existing marketIncreasing product sales to take market leadershipExpanding into other regionsOptimizing ROIDeveloping a service delivery model that incorporates tactical projects

When you’re done, you might scratch your head and reflect: I think this looks OK. It doesn’t. It contains what might be called goals, objectives, actions, and vague statements of intent — but alas, no strategies.

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The 'Silver Tsunami': Why Older Workers Offer Better Value Than Younger Ones

The 'Silver Tsunami': Why Older Workers Offer Better Value Than Younger Ones | WorkLife | Scoop.it
Just a decade ago, experts warned of labor shortages in the United States and other countries as the baby boomers marched into retirement en masse. But with an aging population facing the prospect of living for decades on shrunken retirement funds, graying individuals plan to keep on working.

This “silver tsunami” has received a mixed response in the workplace. On the one hand, many employers have been slow to adapt to the changing needs of older workers and perceive them to be costly and troublesome to hire. Data show that people over the age of 55 find it harder to land jobs than their younger counterparts, even though age discrimination is illegal in many countries. On the other hand, some far-sighted companies around the world are working to recruit, retrain and otherwise engage older workers.

Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor, David Hain
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Laura Rosillo's curator insight, November 20, 3:05 AM

agregar su visión ...

Sebastian Jacquin's curator insight, November 20, 3:55 AM

Great article. I wish companies would embrace the chance to employ "older" employees in Belgium and benefit from their experience. Everyone is chasing young graduates with Master's degree and ignoring and whole other section of potential candidates.

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Gender Balance Doesn’t Have to Start with the CEO

Nicolas Prevost is convinced that gender balance teams produce better business performance. In fact, he is so convinced, that he thinks all he has to do for the rest of his career is transform male-dominated teams into balanced teams and tap the resulting enhancements in engagement, customer relationships and innovation. His own direct reports are balanced: 50% male and 50% female.

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The Future of HR

The Future of HR | WorkLife | Scoop.it

Organizations have to become knowledge networks. An effective knowledge network cultivates the diversity and autonomy of each worker. Networked leaders foster deeper connections, developed through ongoing and meaningful conversations. They understand the importance of tacit knowledge in solving complex problems. 

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Big Thinkers on the Only Things Worth Worrying About

Big Thinkers on the Only Things Worth Worrying About | WorkLife | Scoop.it
In his famous and wonderfully heartening letter of fatherly advice, F. Scott Fitzgerald gave his young daughter Scottie a list of things to worry and not worry about in life. Among the unworriables, he named popular opinion, the past, the future, triumph, and failure “unless it comes through your own fault.” Among the worry-worthy, courage, cleanliness, and efficiency. What Fitzgerald touched on, of course, is the quintessential anxiety of the human condition, which drives us to worry about things big and small, mundane and monumental, often confusing the two classes.
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The Leader Who Wasn't There

The Leader Who Wasn't There | WorkLife | Scoop.it
The prevailing story is that we have more distractions, more information and more decisions pressing our lives than ever before. Our attention span is shrinking; as little as 20 seconds according to some experts. Leaders in many organizations are stretched to breaking; juggling meetings, emails, inquiries and issues. As we manage the task in front of us we are already considering the next or perhaps mulling over a more complex issue that awaits our attention.

This frantic mental traffic puts us into a sort of trance. We see without seeing. We listen without hearing. We are here but not present. We may be in the room but our mind is in some faraway place or time.

So what does this mean in practical terms?

Via David Hain
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Ian Berry's curator insight, November 15, 11:27 PM

I love

Presence says – “I see you.”

Presence says – “I hear you”

Presence says – “You matter”

Presence says – “I care.”


Being present is a choice. As Nigel Risner says "when you're in the room, be in the room."

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, November 16, 5:03 AM

"And let’s face it..

it’s hard to be an effective leader…

if you’re not there."


"As we manage the task in front of us we are already considering the next or perhaps mulling over a more complex issue that awaits our attention.

This frantic mental traffic puts us into a sort of trance. We see without seeing. We listen without hearing. We are here but not present. We may be in the room but our mind is in some faraway place or time."


Dixie Binford's curator insight, November 17, 9:36 AM

This is especially true for our education leaders.

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Takeaways From The Drucker Forum 2014

Takeaways From The Drucker Forum 2014 | WorkLife | Scoop.it
It felt as if there were two conferences: one about "the beginning of the end"; the other about "the end of the beginning."
Josie Gibson's insight:

Wonderful piece from Steve Denning on the death of the industrial era and the rise of the Creative Economy.

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Jason Leong's curator insight, November 23, 8:11 PM

"when you have a goal of making money for the shareholders and the executives, you cannot inspire people to pursue that goal with any commitment or passion. So you have no choice but to run the organizations with command-and-control. You had to have hierarchical bureaucracy to force the employees to pursue a goal that they didn’t really believe in. So shareholder value and hierarchical bureaucracy fit together in a perfect interlocking relationship, like a hand in a glove"

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Why CEOs Need Mentors -- They Accelerate Learning

Why CEOs Need Mentors -- They Accelerate Learning | WorkLife | Scoop.it
A young entrepreneur explains the benefits of the advice he received from an seasoned executive at a large company.

Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, November 16, 6:28 AM

If learning quickly is the key to staying ahead, getting a mentor can help you speed up.  Why wouldn't you?

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The Four Truths of the Storyteller

I’m in the business of creating compelling stories. As a filmmaker, I need to understand how stories touch audiences—why one story is an instantly appealing box office success while another fails miserably to connect. I’ve been fortunate enough to work with some of the world’s most talented storytellers—gifted directors, novelists, screenwriters, actors, and other producers—and from them I’ve gleaned insights into the alchemy of great stories. 

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Jason Leong's curator insight, November 23, 8:40 PM

Truth to the Teller; Truth to the Audience; Truth to the Moment; Truth to the Mission - a recipe for powerful storytelling.

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Julian Treasure: How to speak so that people want to listen - YouTube

Pragmatic tips on how to speak so that people want to listen - and traps to avoid.

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Are You a Leader in a Bubble?

Are You a Leader in a Bubble? | WorkLife | Scoop.it

Executives are essentially operating in a “protective bubble” because the people around them feel that it is their job to protect both the executive and themselves. But in essence, that very ‘inner-circle’ achieves the exact opposite. It puts leaders at greater risk because they don’t get the information they need fast enough to make the right decisions and when they do, it’s been filtered and sanitized. It puts the entire organization at risk as critical decisions get delayed as information slowly reaches the decision maker.


Image credit: HikingArtist, Fritz Ahlefeldt. 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, November 25, 8:27 PM

Too many leaders are getting filtered information from their staff who ‘protect’ them, and that hampers their ability to be effective.


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‘Paths, not works’. A philosopher’s metaphor that explains well our leadership challenges. | Leandro Herrero

‘Paths, not works’. A philosopher’s metaphor that explains well our leadership challenges. | Leandro Herrero | WorkLife | Scoop.it

Good leaders are good path-makers. Sometimes the journey is not clear. The destination may still be ambiguous. It’s the journey, stupid! Pretending that there is a fixed destination and that you know all the highways, roads and pathways, does not make you a good or better leader.

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Are You Chronically Late? 8 Tips for Showing Up on Time.

Are You Chronically Late? 8 Tips for Showing Up on Time. | WorkLife | Scoop.it

Many people have the habit of constantly running late -- and they drive themselves, and other people, crazy. I have the opposite problem -- I'm pathologically early, and often arrive places too soon. This is annoying, as well, but in a different way. As I write this, I’m realize that I assume that chronic earliness is very rare. But maybe it’s not. Are you chronically early?

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Overwhelmed & Rushed? Do a Stress Assess : zen habits

If you find yourself rushing from task to task, worried that you don’t have time to do everything …

If you are feeling a high amount of stress and are just overwhelmed by the number of things you have to do …

You might try doing a Stress Assess.

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Leaders, Don't Let Knowledge Walk Out the Door

Leaders, Don't Let Knowledge Walk Out the Door | WorkLife | Scoop.it

I visit a local bakery every Friday afternoon to purchase Challa bread, a sweet egg bread that just seems to go well with just about every meal. I've been buying a loaf there, each week, for years. Unfortunately, of late, the quality just hasn't been there. We've noticed the bread is not as it should be — and oddly doughy at the center. It was such a surprise when this began to occur. We realized this was a sign that something was off-track.

 The root of the problem began with a personnel change in the bakery — as a highly experienced baker left quite suddenly. With her, left all of the subtleties of the trade that were so important to continued excellence. Sadly, her legacy was lost.

This is an issue that organizations both large and small, must address. How do we effectively capture all of what our valued employees know — all of the strategies and nuances that set them apart as contributors? How do we ensure that this information can be shared going forward? How do we, as individuals, leave our own mark?


Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, November 21, 2:19 AM

The importance of legacy, and good ideas to create it. How solid is your corporate memory?

Dixie Binford's curator insight, November 24, 9:48 AM

This is especially true for the Education industry in the coming years.  We have the Baby Boomers leaving the field with a great deal of expertise.  How can we draw on those experiences and leave the job of education in good shape?  What systems to we have in place to transmit that knowledge to the next generation?

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Put Down Your Phone (And Become More Powerful) | LinkedIn

Put Down Your Phone (And Become More Powerful) | LinkedIn | WorkLife | Scoop.it

The bottom line is this: if you want to engage your employees at a whole new level, if you want to become a person of greater influence, and if you want to discover a new kind of power — listen.

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Mapping the edges | LinkedIn

Mapping the edges | LinkedIn | WorkLife | Scoop.it

The wandering and curiosity of the flâneur. The pattern recognition and sense-making capabilities of the detective. These are good habits, useful skills to have as awareness of the digital era develops. People are looking to others to guide them, to help them navigate the complexities of a networked world. The edges between virtual and physical, online and offline, inside and outside, are blurring. All is liminal, fuzzy, ill-defined. Bridge builders are required. Mapmakers too. Explorers who will simplify and translate what they discover, laying out suggested paths for others to follow.

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The Complexity of Complexity

The Complexity of Complexity | WorkLife | Scoop.it
It’s not enough to say your organization is simple or complicated—you must also understand what kind of complexity you’re dealing with.

Via Philippe Vallat, David Hain
Josie Gibson's insight:

Sense-making - a critical leadership skill - via David Hain.

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Philippe Vallat's curator insight, November 14, 10:45 AM

Quote: "Rather than settling for simplistic representations of reality, leaders must continually work to provide clarity on the complexity, particularly along three lines: purpose, values, and performance."

... and COMITANS may help you in understanding the kind of complexity you are dealing with.

David Hain's curator insight, November 14, 11:27 AM

Sense making is a critical leadership capability - occupies much of my coaching time.

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Signs That You’re a Micromanager

Signs That You’re a Micromanager | WorkLife | Scoop.it

Absolutely no one likes to be micromanaged. It’s frustrating, demoralizing, and demotivating. Yet, some managers can’t seem to help themselves. Dealing with a controlling boss who doesn’t trust you is tough, but what if you’re the one doing the micromanaging?

If you’re like most micromanagers, you probably don’t even know that you’re doing it. Yet the signs are clear.

 

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7 Pieces of Wisdom That Will Change the Way You Work

7 Pieces of Wisdom That Will Change the Way You Work | WorkLife | Scoop.it
Advice that will make you think from Steven Pressfield, Kurt Vonnegut, Martha Graham and more.
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Four Keys to Long-Haul Leadership

Four Keys to Long-Haul Leadership | WorkLife | Scoop.it
He was once regarded as one of the best business leaders in the world. At the end of his career, he was disgraced and, by some measures, considered one of the worst business leaders of all time.

Al Dunlap believed that the primary goal of a company was to make money for its shareholders. To that end, he would lead an organization to massive layoffs and plant closings. The short-term profits would soar, and so would the value of the company.

He led Scott Paper with that ruthless behavior. Thousands of employees lost their jobs. Plants were closed. But it seemed like he had the formula for success when he sold Scott Paper to Kimberly-Clark for $2.8 billion and walked away with his own $100 million golden parachute.

Over time, Dunlap’s true colors began to become clear. He would become CEO of Sunbeam in 1996. He took measures to make the company profitable at all costs, even if they were unethical or illegal. He eventually led the company to bankruptcy.

Short-term leaders and Long-haul Leadership

Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, November 16, 6:32 AM

True leadership value only shows over time. Beware the short term merchants.  A cautionary tale!

John Michel's curator insight, November 16, 11:00 AM

Because they were passionate about their work, long-haul leaders had a strong work ethic. They did what was necessary to get the job done. They were not clock punchers. Because they so loved their work, they hardly saw their vocation as work. It was fun and rewarding.