Working Differently in Extension
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Working Differently in Extension
Following cooperative extension's efforts to work differently in the new knowledge landscape
Curated by Bob Bertsch
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NDSU Extension Releases Winter Survival Kit Smartphone App

NDSU Extension Releases Winter Survival Kit Smartphone App | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

A new smartphone application from the North Dakota State University Extension Service will help motorists stuck in winter weather. It’s available free for both Android and iOS systems.

 

The app will help you find your current location, call 911, notify your friends and family, calculate how long you can run your engine to keep warm and stay safe from carbon monoxide poisoning. You can also use the app to store important phone and policy numbers for insurance or roadside assistance, and designate emergency contacts you want to alert when you become stranded.

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New Scoop.it for Extension: Extension Works the Food System

New Scoop.it for Extension: Extension Works the Food System | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

Abby Gold, Nutrition and Wellness Specialist/Assistant Professor at North Dakota State University Extension Service and University of Minnesota Extension, is now curating information about nationwide Extension work in the area of food systems.

 

Please follow her topic. This is a great example of working differently in Extension!

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Content Curation Skills: Pattern Recognition and Why It Is So Important

Content Curation Skills: Pattern Recognition and Why It Is So Important | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

As we have been discussing content curation as a role for Extension educators, I wanted to re-share this article originally scooped by Robin Good. The comments below are Robin's.

 

 

Excerpted from article:

 

Content curation is a response to the desire to become an expert on a specific topic of interest. Content curation can aid individuals and institutions who seek to gain awareness on developments in an area or seek to become recognized knowledge experts for a specific topic....

 

It is critical to detect emerging patterns in information early to be an effective content curator.

 

Pattern detection is important for a few reasons:

 

1. If there is an emerging pattern, there’s something going on - An emerging pattern is the starting point that signals that an important event is on the cusp of taking place...

 

2. Patterns provide insights on the significance of an event - Patterns provide valuable information on the magnitude and importance of an event....

 

3. Patterns demonstrate how events evolve - Relevance is increasingly time sensitive. The availability of real-time information requires successful content curators to get their hands on fresh information.

 

4. Patterns link together pieces of the information puzzle - A good content curator needs to understand emerging events in their totality...

 

5. Understanding patterns helps to identify experts - The most authoritative people on a topic are usually those that are able to report first on a matter, and generate buzz around new developments.

 

The best curators are those who see patterns that nobody else can see....

 

 


Via Judy O'Connell, Robin Good
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Study shows 2/3 people think social media should be banned at work

Study shows 2/3 people think social media should be banned at work | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it
As social media continues to grow one question keeps popping up, "should employees be allowed to use it in the work place?"

This infographic shows most people think it should not.

What do you think?
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Public-University Leaders Plan for More Hard Times Ahead - Chronicle of Higher Education

Public-University Leaders Plan for More Hard Times Ahead - Chronicle of Higher Education | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

This story provides some highlights of a meeting of chancellors, presidents, provosts, and deans assembled for the annual meeting of the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities.

 

The quotes in the story reflect two distinct ways higher education leaders are responding to the disruption (budget cuts, rising tuition, student loan bubble, etc.) in higher ed.

 

Some, like Ric Porreca, senior vice chancellor and chief financial officer of the University of Colorado at Boulder, seem to be looking for new solutions. Speaking at a session on economic transformation and public universities, he said, "I believe we are at fork in the road right now," and posed the question: "Are we serious about new models?" 

 

Others are responding with "stay the course." Kim A. Wilcox, provost of Michigan State University, said working within the existing system is precisely what helped his institution cope with a sustained economic crisis. 

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End the Office? Students Want Right to Work From Home [INFOGRAPHIC]

End the Office? Students Want Right to Work From Home [INFOGRAPHIC] | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it
A survey from Cisco finds that college students and young professionals expect a great amount of flexibility in their work environment.
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Key social learning resources: Part 10 - Learning in the Social Workplace

Key social learning resources: Part 10 - Learning in the Social Workplace | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

At DevLearn, presentations (Slideshare included) from:

 

Charles Dennings - Do you feel the need to manage learning? 

 

Harold Jarche - Managing in a Networked World

 

Jane Hart - From Command & Control to Encourage & Engage: A new mindset for learning leaders


Via Jacques Cool
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The Learning Generalist: Knowledge Management in the age of Social Media

The Learning Generalist: Knowledge Management in the age of Social Media | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

While content is valuable, context is significantly more precious. To know your colleague who wrote that phenomenal blogpost, to be able to see how people used her ideas, to be able to look at the other contributions by this user, etc are a generative side to the knowledge management puzzle. It's a side that opens up possibilities for serendipity which traditional content focussed approaches are unlikely to achieve.


Via Jacques Cool
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50 Great Ways to Grow Your Personal Learning Network

50 Great Ways to Grow Your Personal Learning Network | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

Personal learning networks have always existed, but modern technology has put a new spin on how and where we connect with others. These days, personal learning networks, or PLNs, extend far beyond friends, family, coworkers, college classmates, and teachers, and can encompass experts and learners from around the world in just about any given field.


Via Nik Peachey
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elenired's comment, October 30, 2011 10:45 PM
excellent!!!!!!!!!
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How Meditating Helps with Multitasking | MindShift

How Meditating Helps with Multitasking | MindShift | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

The article above is a must-read. Highlights include:

 

>> "“We’re led to believe that we’re victims and we don’t have a choice in the matter and it’s the Internet’s fault,” Levy said at the Innovative Learning Conference last week. “But the problem is bigger than technology.”"

 

>> "Levy’s proposal to parents and to the education system: Teach the tools that will teach kids to focus, avoid distraction, and judge what to pay attention to as they’re exposed to a slew of diversions. It’s a matter of training the brain."

 

>> "Attention is like a muscle that needs to be trained. If the muscle is untrained, the mind wanders all over the place all day long. The same thing applies to any skill — it takes practice."

 

I'll be adding David Levy's book "Scrolling Forward: Making Sense of Documents in the Digital Age" to my reading list.

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Digital native BS = age discrimination

Digital native BS = age discrimination | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

The debate around the existence of digital natives has been going on in K12 education circles for years. The question, do people born after the start of the digital revolution (basically the birth of the web) learn differently than those born pre-web, is key to how educators approach teaching with or without technology.

 

I've heard sentiments similar to the digital natives argument in cooperative extension. They may not put as fine a point on it (e.g. those born after Jan. 1, 2003), but there are those in our organization who believe that "younger" people are more able to adopt and engage in new technologies.

 

As Jay Cross points out in this post, there is a simple and serious term for that kind of thinking, age discrimination. The idea that older workers are less able to use online technologies, which are critical to doing our jobs as extension educators, is ridiculous. Acting on that idea might be illegal.

 

Are supervisors, with this bias in mind, steering older workers away from professional development on social media? Are they assuming younger workers don't need assistance and training in the use of online networks because they are "digital natives"? I hope not. But when I continue to hear extension educators and administrators express their feeling that older workers are unable to adopt new technology, I worry about our future.

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Google+ Hangouts: Six Practical Uses for Online Education (and Extension)

Google+ Hangouts: Six Practical Uses for Online Education (and Extension) | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

I've used Google + Hangouts for a couple of meetings. What stands out to me is the ease of use. Along with the uses covered in the attached article, you can also "broadcast" a Hangout with Hangout On-Air. Hangouts have some limitations, but I can see them being a great tool for extension education.

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Is Gaming the New Essential Literacy? | MindShift

Is Gaming the New Essential Literacy? | MindShift | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

"“When people learn to play video games,” said James Paul Gee, “they are learning a new literacy.”

 

This is one of the reason kids love playing them: They are learning a new interactive language that grants them access to virtual worlds that are filled with intrigue, engagement and meaningful challenges. And one that feels more congruent with the nature and trajectory of today’s world."

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Sean Parker and Jim Breyer Predict the Industries Social Media Will Reinvent Next

Sean Parker and Jim Breyer Predict the Industries Social Media Will Reinvent Next | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

At the recent Techonomy conference, Sean Parker of Founders Fund and Jim Breyer of Accel Partners discussed how the world will be different three to five years from now.

 

Here are a couple of highlights that might be of interest to readers of "Working Differently in Extension."

 

Jim "Breyer gave evidence—from social-network-enabled crime fighting in Brazil’s favelas, to global skilled-laborer jobs training, to the 100,000 students in Stanford’s online machine learning class—of the expanding trend for governments, universities, and businesses to bring social media to bear on social progress.

His firm has already backed higher-education distance-learning companies in China and India, and is looking at others in Brazil."

 

>>>>>

 

"He’s also seeking ways for US professors and teachers to reach tens if not hundreds of thousands of students to build the skilled workforce the nation needs. “There’s absolutely no doubt in the next 5-7 years…the Stanfords, the Harvards, the MITs, as well as many other great US research universities, will be disseminating important content online at a fraction of what it costs students today to go to Cambridge or Palo Alto or other physical campuses,” Breyer said."

 

>>>>>

 

"In fact, the “craft model” of self-employment in the arts is emerging off the radar of the national jobs policy conversation, Breyer said. He’s meeting college students who are deciding not to go to [work at] Facebook or Google, but to start their own craft- or social-oriented businesses that reach customers through nontraditional means, enabled by services like Square, Etsy, and AirBnB. “We’re seeing an explosion in that kind of employment. People are working from home or in small offices. It’s happening in the U.S. as well as China and Brazil and many emerging markets in a much more profound way than people think,” Breyer said."

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Does This Image Say "Computerized Record-Keeping" To You?

Does This Image Say "Computerized Record-Keeping" To You? | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

Would you take advice from someone who thinks this image says, "Computerized Record-Keeping"?

 

I ran across this clip-art tragedy in the article, "Establishing and Using a Farm Financial Record-Keeping System" on the eXtension web site, http://www.extension.org/pages/11140/establishing-and-using-a-farm-financial-record-keeping-system.

 

Full disclosure: I do not own nor have I ever lived on a farm, I am barely able to keep reliable financial records for myself and I only scanned the above article.

 

That said, seriously, would you trust any organization whose idea of computerized record-keeping involved a floppy disk?

 

At best, this is a failure of the article's author(s) to realize how important images are in communication. Readers of web-based content are scanners. The impact of the images and headings in an article often (always?) outweighs the text.

 

At worst, the author(s) really feels these images are representative of the technology in use on America's farms. I'm willing to bet there are many more farmers who currently access financial information via their smartphone, than their are farmers who have ever used a computer with a 5 and 1/4 inch drive.

 

Is this how people think of Extension, an organization of adding machines and calculators trying to exist in a networked world?

 

 

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Social Media Revolution 3 (4:15 version via Erik Qualman)

A good video full of social media and other statistics that demonstrate how the world is changing. 

 

One quote from the video: "We don't have a choice on whether we do social media, the question is how well we do it" - Erik Qualmann

 

Thanks to Anne Adrian, http://www.twitter.com/aafromaa, for sharing this with me.

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Future of Talent

Future of Talent | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

This is a great post from Jay Cross. Although it refers to trends impacting human resources leadership, I think there is a lot for "workers" to gain from reading the post, including nuggets like:

 

- "The idea that the CEO is running the show is fiction. We’re the boss. Leadership is collective and concurrent. There’s no center."

 

- "Rather than wring our hands about invasions of privacy, we must rewrite the rules for IP, openness, differentiating our personal and professional lives, and contextual ideation. Making sense of oceans of information takes a collaborative effort; we’ve got to get together on this."

 

- "Working in teams, sharing and collaborating across silos and organizations challenge normal ways of work, recruiting, and learning. New work communities may replace traditional corporations."

 

There's much more, but I'll let you discover it for yourself, http://www.internettime.com/2011/11/future-of-talent-2/

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Building a Cadre of Cooperative Extension Public Intellectuals

Building a Cadre of Cooperative Extension Public Intellectuals | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

This post from Jim Langcuster makes the argument for creating a group of Extension professionals who are "thinkers...who not only articulate but also offer constructive solutions to the most pressing public policy issues of the day."

 

Jim points out that Extension has has a history of "building consensus for change" at a grassroots level. "While we have been highly effective players at the grassroots throughout much of our 100-year history, we have not carried over this success to national levels of discourse. Simply put, we have not been as successful engaging this nation’s leading public intellectuals at major daily newspapers and networks and, more recently, influential social media venues."

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NEW Workplace Learning

NEW Workplace Learning | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

"In Jane Hart’s new book, NEW Workplace Learning she explains what is happening, and how L&D needs to re-think their role in the organisation – that is moving from one focused on creating, delivering and managing training (both face-to-face and e-learning) to one that encourages and engages workers in new ways of learning in order to support their performance in the workplace, aka working smarter."

 

This page and the associated links on the "Smart Worker" are fantastic. In a recent discussion on training in our organization, it was remarkable how few people were thinking critically about workplace learning. 

 

This is required reading for those who deliver workplace learning AND those who strive to learn more effectively in the workplace.

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Quick advice from Extension poultry expert helps save backyard chicken

Quick advice from Extension poultry expert helps save backyard chicken | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it
This post demonstrates how Extension is just a part of a broader knowledge network. It is e story of a chicken saved when the advice of an Extension specialist was combined with the experience of another poultry farmer.
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The Arab Intellectuals Who Didn’t Roar

The Arab Intellectuals Who Didn’t Roar | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

Jim Langcuster shared this article on Google Plus with the comment, "This is fascinating at several levels. Intellectual vanguards, who have played such a pivotal role in previous revolutions, have been conspicuously absent in the Arabic uprisings. This raises the intriguing question: Have new media rendered revolutionary intellectuals obsolete? Some big lessons here for anyone entrusted with intellectual vanguard roles, including Extension."

 

I agree with Jim. This article looks at intellectual leadership in a number of ways worth  our attention.

 

This quote from the article, "People are looking for short pieces that illuminate some aspect of what they’re going through, not grand theories," speaks to Extension's history and, possibly, to its future.

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SDSU announces hiring of 44 Extension staffers for 8 regional centers | The Daily Republic | Mitchell, South Dakota

SDSU announces hiring of 44 Extension staffers for 8 regional centers | The Daily Republic | Mitchell, South Dakota | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it
In the wake of state budget cuts, South Dakota moves from an Extension office in every county to eight regional centers in Aberdeen, Lemmon, Mitchell, Pierre, Rapid City, Sioux Falls, Watertown and Winner.
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2011 eXtension Virtual Conference Recordings

2011 eXtension Virtual Conference Recordings | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

In case you missed any of the National eXtension Virtual Conference last week, here's a link, http://www.extension.iastate.edu/broadcasts/recordings/NeVC2011/default.htm, to the recordings of each session, as well as the recordings of the followup discussions.

 

Each of the sessions and discussions was thought-provoking and informative. I hope you will check them out. 

 

Howard Rheingold: Using Social Media in Learning and Co-learning

 

Robin Good: How Social Media, Curation and Infotention Will Transform Your Future

 

Paulette Robinson: Out of this World: Virtual Worlds in Government

 

Clay Shirky: Social Media, Curating, and Convening: Getting Value from Group Interaction

 

Steven Rosenbaum: Curate The Cloud. How Too Much Information Puts Humans Back In Charge

 

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To pitch a perfect game, teach yourself online

To pitch a perfect game, teach yourself online | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

The official Google blog shared this story of a teacher who knew almost nothing about baseball but won $1 million by pitching a perfect game on the MLB 2K11 video game.

 

He taught himself about baseball, pitching and mastering the video game through self-directed, online learning. 

 

He learned the strategy and mechanics necessary to complete an extremely rare and difficult task with no classroom, no seminar, no expert, no educator.

 

For me this is less about the power of search (that's Google's message) and more about the role of the educator in the age of self-directed, online learning. What do you think this story says about the future of educators and experts?

 

 

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Sarah Baughman's comment, October 24, 2011 2:14 PM
Interesting question Bob. Experts and educators are facing some interesting challenges and opportunities as the way people learn evolves. There's lots and lots and lots of information on the web but presumably part of how this guy was able to learn online was because he was able to sort the good from the not-so-good and there's a good chance an educator helped him learn the evaluate information and think critically about it before he began his online learning journey. Educators need to understand that although the "answers" are available online, our role is to help people navigate their learning through critical thinking, analyzing, etc..
Bob Bertsch's comment, October 24, 2011 4:38 PM
Thanks for your comment, Sarah. I agree with you. Educators have to acknowledge the roles you mention. They also have to realize that they no longer have a corner on the information market. Some of the information shared by extension educators is not unique and may be better delivered by the "crowd." In the example of pitching a perfect game, finding and using the information requires little analysis or critical thinking. You could use trial and error to test that kind of information with little or no risk. How much time do educators spend creating "knowledge" that is available from a hundreds or thousands of sources and could be easily tested (at low risk) with trial and error or effectively judged based on comments/ranking? My guess is quite a bit.
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Hackers are vital to the university culture of openness and innovation

Hackers are vital to the university culture of openness and innovation | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

"At the University of Lincoln, the values of hacking are embedded within Student as Producer, an institution-wide project for curriculum development where students are regarded as part of the academic project of the university. We are keen to reclaim and reconnect the values of openness and collaboration that hackers are known for with the values of the academy, and are doing so by bringing students into the research project of the university itself. At Lincoln, undergraduate student hackers have been working on real research and development projects with university staff and contributing to the development of a culture of openness and innovation."

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