Working Differently in Extension
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Working Differently in Extension
Following cooperative extension's efforts to work differently in the new knowledge landscape
Curated by Bob Bertsch
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The Mobile Social Photo Explosion [INFOGRAPHIC]

The Mobile Social Photo Explosion [INFOGRAPHIC] | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

This inforgraphic from Mediabiestro is a great visual of the mobile revolution.

 

Here's an excerpt:

 

The digital revolution has made an enormous impact on photography, and smartphones and social media have been hugely instrumental in this massive growth.

 

** 300 million photos are uploaded to Facebook daily

 

**Facebook has 10,000 times more photos than the Library of Congress

 

**Twitter (6.9 million daily active mobile users) and Instagram

 

**(7.3 million daily active mobile users) combined account for hours of photo-taking usage each month, and photos make up 42 percent of all posts on Tumblr.

 

 

**The money stat? 741 million mobile phones worldwide have some kind of photo capability.

 

Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

See article and infographic here: [http://bit.ly/SLt2Nz]


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How Do You Know If Your Blog Is Making an Impact? | Social Media Today

How Do You Know If Your Blog Is Making an Impact? | Social Media Today | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

"This post from Mark Schaefer of Social Media Today discusses how he went about discovering if his blog had any impact.  Quite simply, he contacted people who had left comments on his blog and spoke with them directly.  He was able to discover a very real impact he had on readers this way. 

If you blog as part of your Extension work and want to document impact a great place to start is with your commenters.  You have a couple of options - you can create a survey to send to them or you can contact them individually and have an informal conversations.  We often measure engagement on blogs through the number of comments but this offers a way to go beyond basic engagement metrics and find out how you are really impacting your audience.  This also gives you a way to discover more about your audience.  Who are they and why do they read your blog out of the millions of blogs on the web.  How did they discover you?  Have they learned anything or changed practice based on your blog? 

Let me know if you have other ways you have dug deeper into evaluating your blog."

 

 


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John Blue's comment, December 25, 2012 3:47 PM
Love the analogy of Wordpress as an asteroid making a statement on the world.
John Blue's comment, December 25, 2012 4:06 PM
For Truffle Media episodes we have several approaches to seeing if there is impact made: periodic surveys, episode download counts, reviewing general Google analytics, email update clicks (opens metrics tracked but less important), and going to events and talking with people. 

The objective metrics (clicks, downloads, etc) are what drive revenue but the subjective stories are what people love to hear. We aim to collect both and be able to tell various stories about how people feel, act, and take action.
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Enterprise Learners v Entrepreneurial Learners

Enterprise Learners v Entrepreneurial Learners | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

Like Jane Hart, author of the post above, I absolutely love John Seely Brown's term "entrepreneurial learner."

 

It's a great way to contrast learners who "... constantly look around all the time for new ways, new resources to learn new things" with "enterprise learners" who pick up "a set of fixed assets that have been “authoritatively, transferred in delivery models“."

 

I also love Brown's analogy of enterprise learners as oceanliners that set a course and keep going for a long time, and entrepreneurial learners as whitewater kayakers who operate in a constantly changing flow, creating their own path.

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What motivates you at work?

What motivates you at work? | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

Here's a post about motivation that challenges our assumption that external factors like money are good motivators.

 

Daniel Pink examined the science of motivation in his book, "Drive," and concluded that external motivators are not very effective. Here's a cool RSA Animate video featuring Daniel Pink talking about what motivates us, http://youtu.be/u6XAPnuFjJc

 

From the article linked above:

 

"3 ways to enhance motivation

 

Fowler suggests beginning by evaluating the quality of A-R-C in your life.  Looking back at over 40 years of motivation research, Fowler shared that the answer to creating a more motivating environment is a combination of increased Autonomy (control of your experiences),Relatedness (working together with others), and Competence (developing and refining new skills).  The good news is that anyone can change their motivational outlook with some self-awareness and self-regulation."

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Working Differently in Extension - John Blue & Jerry Buchko

Working Differently in Extension - John Blue & Jerry Buchko | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it
An interview with John Blue, chief of community creation with Truffle Media Networks, and Jerry Buchko, counselor, coach & tutor of personal finance in private practice, recorded at the 2012 eXtension National Conference.

 

I really felt privileged to speak with John and Jerry. Both come from outside of cooperative extension, but have enthusiastically engaged with extension communities. We were lucky to have them at the National eXtension Conference and we are lucky to have them as part of our community.

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The revolution starts within | Harold Jarche

The revolution starts within | Harold Jarche | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

Great advice from Harold Jarche:

 

- Prepare yourself to be a continuous learner.

- Prepare yourself and your team/department to work collaboratively.

- Start narrating your work. Become a knowledge curator and share widely.

- Engage in professional social networks and communities of practice.

- Model the behaviours you would like to see in others.

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Unbridled Optimism, Bouts with Doubt at NeXC 2012

Unbridled Optimism, Bouts with Doubt at NeXC 2012 | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

My friend Steve Judd told me that at events like the eXtension National Conference (which we are both currently attending) he vascilates between moments of euphoria and moments of doubt. I knew exactly what he was talking about.

 

Being surrounded by smart, energetic people sharing new ideas is exciting. It makes me incredibly optimistic about the future of cooperative extension and nearly giddy over the opportunities we have to change the world for the better. Then there is the moment when the doubt creeps in. Someone says, "Yeah, that sounds great, but what about our funding?" or "I'd love to do that, but I don't have the time."


I think sometimes when we say "working differently," we mean "doing more." To me "working differently" means changing what we do; not changing our purpose, but changing the things we do to fulfill that purpose. That probably means changing our priorities, changing how we are funded and making other significant changes.

 

We talk about transformational education but focus on deliverables. We talk about engagement but measure website hits and attendees. We talk about solving complex problems but rely on a an development and evaluation framework ill-equipped to address complexity.

 

And so it goes (thanks, Kurt Vonnegut) from optimism to doubt and back again. I might not always have faith that we will have the organizational will and courage to make the changes before us, but I do have faith in the people. The creative, dedicated people who are working differently even when it means doing more fill me with unbridled optimism and make me believe we can change.

 

(image by marsmet543, http://www.flickr.com/photos/71744937@N07/7274551070/, used under Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

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Steve Judd's comment, October 5, 2012 2:56 PM
Luckily, the bouts of optimism outnumbered the moments of doubt. I left the conference excited and energized and really value the new connections I made, and the old connections that were strengthened!
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Working Differently in Extension Podcast - Marissa Stone

Working Differently in Extension Podcast - Marissa Stone | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

An interview with information technologist and social media strategist Marissa Stone recorded at the 2012 eXtension National Conference. We talked to Marissa about how she used social media to promote the Priester National Extension Health Conference before, during and after the event.

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Connecting at NeXc2012

Connecting at NeXc2012 | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

I typically use this topic page for sharing information from others, but this week I'll be using it to blog my experiences at the 2012 eXtension National Conference in Oklahoma City, OK.

 

eXtension (http://www.extension.org) is a great example of how cooperative extension can work differently, and this conference will highlight some of the new ways extension educators are doing just that.

 

I arrived in OKC a bit early. The conference gets underway tomorrow. This morning I attended a meeting of the Network Literacy Community of Practice (http://www.extension.org/network_literacy).

 

"The Network Literacy Community of Practice aims to build a community around learning in online networked environments. This community will use available/emerging networks, technology, and information to form the community and engage others." In short, we help you connect; connect for learning, connect for sharing and connect to engage the people you serve.

 

You can start by connecting with us.

 

Follow AleX NetLit on Twitter (http://www.twitter.com/AleXNetLit)

Like Network Literacy on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/NetworkLiteracy)

+1 eXtension Network Literacy on Google+ (https://plus.google.com/100994641102542483850)

 

Check back for more from NeXC2012 and more on working differently in extension.

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The Top 100 Tools for Learning 2012 list is revealed

The Top 100 Tools for Learning 2012 list is revealed | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it
This year’s Top 100 Tools for Learning list (the 6th Annual Survey) has been compiled from the votes of 582 learning professionals worldwide – 55% working in education, 45% working in non-educational organizations.
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Purpose Driven Tribes: Gaining Control & Influence in the Marketplace

Purpose Driven Tribes: Gaining Control & Influence in the Marketplace | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

This piece was brought to my attention by my wonderful friend and colleague, Jennifer Sertl. It was written in April of 2011 by Jay Deragon who is always articulates the present and the future in a way that hopefully expands your awareness which we all need in today's marketplace.

 

Here are some of the highlights:

 

**People are gathering in "tribes" to connect, collaborate, discover and influence change.

 

**Social technology provides people the ability to aggregate around everything and anywhere.

 

**The market sees this and attempts to aggregate self serving tribes but the people have a different purpose & their own tribe

 

**The aggregation of tribes has become the pursuit of the market. Pulling groups and custom networks has become a common practice of the markets managing these tribes with a purpose different than simply gatering of the trade.

 

The evolving dynamics of tribal aggregation are the dynamics that will change the way markets interact with tribes

 

1. Tribes control the message with growing influence over markets

 

2. Tribes have a purpose. Help them fulfill their purpose and just maybe you'll become part of that tribe

 

3. Companies will have to learn that they are not the "connection" to the tribes, internal and external hold the keys to tribal influence

 

4> Tribes do need management, they need tools to accomplish their objectives and will always be self managed

 

5. Tribal leaers are more interested in serving tribe members than themselves.

 

Here is a great takeaway:

 

Seth Godin writes: "Tribe management is a whole different way of looking at it.

 

**It starts with permission, the understanding that the real asset isn't an amorphous brand but is in fact the privilege of delivering anticipated relevant messages to people who want to get them


Selected by: Jan Gordon covering "Curation, Social Business & Beyond"


 


 


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Beth Kanter's curator insight, December 11, 2012 3:52 PM

Another way to think about the "network mindset" and network weaving as per point 4.

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FUTURE PERFECT by Steven Johnson - The Power of Peer Networks

 

Are online networks just an example of a broader social movement from "containers to connections" or from "hierarchies to wirearchies"? Steven B. Johnson, author of WHERE GOOD IDEAS COME FROM, points to the power or peer networks, online and off, in this video.

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Facebook photo tagging: A crowdsourced success story

Facebook photo tagging: A crowdsourced success story | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

John Haydon of Scocialbrite writes about "An Oregon State University ichthyologist, Brian Sidlauskas, and his colleagues (who are also his Facebook friends) documented more than 5,000 fish in under 24 hours using Facebook." and asks "How are you using Facebook to solve problems?"

 

Cooperative Extension needs to stop thinking of social media as just another broadcast medium. We need to find ways to use social media to solve problems.

 

Do you have ideas or examples? Please share.

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Working Differently in Extension - Karen Jeanette & Marissa Stone

Working Differently in Extension - Karen Jeanette & Marissa Stone | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

Karen Jeanette (pictured), who works with eXtension Communities of Practice support, and information technologist and social media strategist Marissa Stone talk about getting professionals connected with online networks.

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Working Differently in Extension Podcast - Amy Hays & Maggie Lawrence

Working Differently in Extension Podcast - Amy Hays & Maggie Lawrence | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

An interview with Amy Hays (pictured), Texas A&M AgriLife Extension, and Maggie Lawrence, Alabama Cooperative Extension Service, recorded at the 2012 eXtension National Conference. Amy and Maggie talk about the importance of images and video in online communication.

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Get Your Personal Learning Network in Place – Before You Need It

Get Your Personal Learning Network in Place – Before You Need It | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

This post points out how helpful a Personal Learning Network can be and the importance of cultivating that network before you need it.

 

It reminds me of Tara Hunt's idea of "whuffie" or social capital. If you have not made connections and offered at least a little value to those you are connected with, you won't have any social capital to drawn on when you need it.

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“Working out loud”: Your personal content strategy

“Working out loud”: Your personal content strategy | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it
Thanks to Harold Jarche and Jane Bozarth for pointing out this post about narrating your work.

" It only takes a few posts before people start seeing the benefits. Being able to work out loud allows employees to make connections – finding people and content relevant to their work – like never before."
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Will Professional Reputation Trump Education Credentials?

Will Professional Reputation Trump Education Credentials? | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

Attention knowledge workers! You are competing against the world!

 

This NYT blog post reviews a couple of surveys conducted by online staffing companies that show some interesting trends.

 

"Not all those young companies will survive, but the habit of hiring online seems baked in; 64 percent of respondents said at least half of their work force would be online by 2015...."

 

If the work force is online, geography doesn't matter. That means you will be competing with potential workers around the world.

 

"The idea, Mr. Swart said, is to foster the growth of online workers. In other words, if you’re reading this from one of the better parts of the global economy, it’s a good time to think about how to be indispensable."

 

The other trend has to do with how the criteria companies are using to hire online workers.

 

"Only 6 percent of the survey respondents rated schooling as a “very important” reason to hire someone. It was the lowest-rated reason to hire someone. Work experience was first, followed by how other people rated the contractor, pay, portfolio of work, references, and scores on skills tests that oDesk offers online."

 

At least among these companies, education credentials are less important than professional reputation. You need to be building that reputation by narrating your work, sharing your skills and developing your online portfolio if you want to compete for online work in the future.

 

Thanks to Jim Langcuster for sharing the NYT blog post.

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eXtension Learn: eXtension 2012 National Conference

eXtension Learn: eXtension 2012 National Conference | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

I just returned from the eXtension 2012 National Conference in Oklahoma City. The conference featured some very good presentations, some of which were streamed live and archived.

 

You can view those archives and get more information about all the conference presentations at https://learn.extension.org/conferences/nexc2012

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Evaluating Social Media 101 - Slideshare

Social media can be a powerful tool for Extension educators to expand their reach and engage with clients. Communities of practice and state systems are increasingly using Facebook, Twitter, and other social media as part of their programming efforts. This presents challenges for program evaluation as traditional evaluation methods rely on information not always available in social media.

 

In this session, Sarah Baughman (http://www.scoop.it/u/sarah-baughman) situates social media in the context of program evaluation and offers tips and suggestions for evaluating social media activities. Emphasis will be placed on tools to help measure reach and engagement through social media.

 

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Private (Practice) Meets Communities of Practice

Private (Practice) Meets Communities of Practice | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

Jerry Buchko is a counselor, coach and tutor in personal finance. He is in private practice in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area. He is also a member of 2 eXtension communities of practice (CoP).

 

In a breakout session at the 2012 National eXtension Communities of Practice Conference (NeXC2012), he expalined how he found the work cooperative extension was doing in personal finance and engaged with it. He didn't contact his county extension office or his state extension service. He was seeking professional development resources and, because the Financial Literacy for All CoP was engaged in online networks, he found them.

 

But this is not just the story of how a "customer" found extension resources online. After participating a Military Families Learning Network/Financial Security for All webinar, Jerry contacted the Military Families Learning Network to let them know how impressed he was with the webinar. It could have ended there. The CoP could have added Jerry's testimonial to an annual report and never thought of him again.

 

Fortunately, that's not what happened. Instead he got an invitation to join the community. I'm not sure how many CoPs would have extended that invitation. Jerry does not work in cooperative extension. He is not affiliated with a land-grant university. Would another CoP have welcomed Jerry, as an equal, into their community of "experts"?

 

Jerry accepted the invitation to join the community and eventually joined the Network Literacy CoP as well. Both communities gained a skilled, intelligent, contributing member. They also gained access to Jerry's network. As Jerry engaged with the CoPs, he shared his experiences with the people he was connected with online. 

 

None of this would have happened if the CoPs had viewed Jerry as just an audience member or as a competitor. 

 

You can learn more and engage in the conversation around the breakout session at http://learn.extension.org/conferences/nexc2012/events/676

 

Check out the session notes at http://bit.ly/NeXC2012Buchko ;

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Talent vs Labour | Harold Jarche

Talent vs Labour | Harold Jarche | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

"If you want to be valued (and paid) in the network era, then you need to do work with high task variety, requiring continuous informal learning, and based on mostly implicit (tacit) knowledge that cannot be easily codified or shared. This is how talent gets respect from capital. Talent is not easily replaceable."

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Coworking trend connects solo professionals in communal spaces - TwinCities.com

Coworking trend connects solo professionals in communal spaces - TwinCities.com | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

Here's a nice little piece that was in the local paper. It's about the growing enthusiasm for coworking spaces that's developing into a mainstream trend. All the reasons that make these spaces engaging for their users I see as just as much and, in some cases, even more potential for positive social benefits in such dedicated spaces in virtual worlds settings like Second Life.

Thoughts?
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Working Differently in Extension 032 - Jill Heemstra, UNL Extension, LPELC

Working Differently in Extension 032 - Jill Heemstra, UNL Extension, LPELC | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it
Jill Heemstra, University of Nebraska Extension Educator and Livestock and Poultry Environmental Learning Center Coordinator talks about #manuremonday, engaging the public in Extension work and building a successful community of practice.
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Let's Kill the Org Chart - Weaving the next workplace

Let's Kill the Org Chart - Weaving the next workplace | Working Differently in Extension | Scoop.it

Harold Jarche shares this great visual of what happens when organizations think of jobs as empty spaces to be filled in a organizational chart.

 

"It shows that thinking of jobs as buckets to fill can leave them empty or half-full. Instead, if you think of the organization as a network, then you look for gaps that need to be connected."


I think it is imperative to change our way of thinking about how work gets done. if it means the end of the org chart, all the better.

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