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Home : Statistics for Biologists

Home : Statistics for Biologists | Work interest | Scoop.it
A collection of articles from the publisher of Nature that discusses statistical issues biologists should be aware of and provides practical advice to improve the statistical rigor and reproducibility of their work.

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High hopes for new malaria vaccine based on blood protein - The Independent

High hopes for new malaria vaccine based on blood protein - The Independent | Work interest | Scoop.it
“ A new type of malaria vaccine based on proteins found in the blood of children who develop a natural resistance to the parasitic disease has been developed by American researchers.”
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MRC press office's curator insight, May 23, 2014 5:34 AM

Professor Mike Blackman, a malaria researcher at the MRC National Institute for Medical Research, said: “The study is quite an important step forward and potentially raises the prospect of this becoming a vaccine candidate and combining it with other vaccine candidates… but they still have a long way to go.”

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Tours : un nouveau projet de recherche clinique pour étudier la ...

Tours : un nouveau projet de recherche clinique pour étudier la ... | Work interest | Scoop.it
“Le projet Nicad (pour “Neuroinflammation et déclin cognitif dans la maladie d'Alzheimer : étude pilote de l'imagerie TEP des proteines translocatrices (TSPO) à l'aide du [18F] DPA-714”) vient d'obtenir un financement de l'Agence Nationale de la...”
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Malaria drug resistance spreading | Lancastria.net Yea Blackburn ...

Malaria drug resistance spreading | Lancastria.net Yea Blackburn ... | Work interest | Scoop.it
“ Scientists have found new evidence that resistance to the front-line treatments for malaria is increasing. They have ...”
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homunculus: Molecular mechanisms of evolution


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Pharmacophore Modeling, Homology Modeling, and in silico Screening Reveal Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitory Activities for Sotalol, Glyburide, Metipranolol, Sulfamethizole, Glipizide, and Pi...

Pharmacophore Modeling, Homology Modeling, and in silico Screening Reveal Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitory Activities for Sotalol, Glyburide, Metipranolol, Sulfamethizole, Glipizide, and Pi... | Work interest | Scoop.it
“ Available online 13 March 2013 Publication year: 2013 Source:Journal of Molecular Graphics and Modelling Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase and member of the PI3K-related kinase (PIKK) family.”
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Virology Journal | Abstract | Inactivation of Chikungunya virus by 1,5 iodonapthyl azide

“ Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthropod borne alphavirus of the family Togaviridae. CHIKV is a reemerging virus for which there is no safe prophylactic vaccine.”
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Symphony of life, revealed: New imaging technique captures vibrations of proteins, tiny motions critical to human life

Symphony of life, revealed: New imaging technique captures vibrations of proteins, tiny motions critical to human life | Work interest | Scoop.it
Like the strings on a violin or the pipes of an organ, the proteins in the human body vibrate in different patterns, scientists have long suspected. Now, a new study provides what researchers say is the first conclusive evidence that this is true. The team found that the vibrations, which were previously thought to dissipate quickly, actually persist in molecules like the "ringing of a bell," said UB physics professor Andrea Markelz, PhD, who led the study. These tiny motions enable proteins to change shape quickly so they can readily bind to other proteins, a process that is necessary for the body to perform critical biological functions like absorbing oxygen, repairing cells and replicating DNA, Markelz said. The team's technique for studying vibrations could be used in the future to document how natural and artificial inhibitors stop proteins from performing vital functions by blocking desired vibrations. "We can now try to understand the actual structural mechanisms behind these biological processes and how they are controlled."
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Coarse Grained Model for Biological Simulations: Recent Refinements and Validation - Vicatos - Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics - Wiley Online Library

Coarse Grained Model for Biological Simulations: Recent Refinements and Validation - Vicatos - Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics - Wiley Online Library | Work interest | Scoop.it
AbstractExploring the free energy landscape of proteins and modeling the corresponding functional aspects presents a major challenge for computer simulation approaches. This challenge is due to the complexity of the landscape and the enormous computer time needed for converging simulations. The use of various simplified coarse grained (CG) models offers an effective way of sampling the landscape, but most current models are not expected to give a reliable description of protein stability and functional aspects. The main problem is associated with insufficient focus on the electrostatic features of the model. In this respect our recent CG model offers significant advantage as it has been refined while focusing on its electrostatic free energy. Here we review the current state of our model, describing recent refinement, extensions and validation studies while focusing on demonstrating key applications. These include studies of protein stability, extending the model to include membranes and electrolytes and electrodes as well as studies of voltage activated proteins, protein insertion trough the translocon, the action of molecular motors and even the coupling of the stalled ribosome and the translocon. Our example illustrates the general potential of our approach in overcoming major challenges in studies of structure function correlation in proteins and large macromolecular complexes. Keywords:Coarse Grained model;free energy calculations;dielectric constants;proton transfer;protein residue interactions;simulated protein unfolding
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PALUDISME: Identification de 3 formes de résistance chez P. falciparum

PALUDISME: Identification de 3 formes de résistance chez P. falciparum | Work interest | Scoop.it

Le développement de la résistance chez certaines souches du parasite Plasmodium falciparum, aux anti-paludiques comme l'artémisinine, pourrait être dévastateur, alertent à nouveau ces scientifiques de l'Université d'Oxford qui viennent d'identifier...

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Drug-resistant malaria parasites found in Cambodia //let them use DDT&secure our borders

Drug-resistant malaria parasites found in Cambodia //let them use DDT&secure our borders | Work interest | Scoop.it

Last year, scientists warned that drug-resistant strains of malaria were spreading in Cambodia and also appearing along the border between Thailand and Myanmar, raising concerns of an epidemic.

Now scientists have pinpointed the malaria-causing parasites that are able to withstand treatment by the anti-malarial drug artemisinin, according to a study published in the journal Nature Genetics. 

The lead author of the study, Dr Olivo Miotto, from Oxford University and Mahidol University,told the BBC that artemisinin is currently the best defence against the mosquito-borne disease. The drug is used widely and can treat an infection in days when combined with other drugs. 

“All the most effective drugs that we have had in the last few decades have been one by one rendered useless by the remarkable ability of this parasite to mutate and develop resistance,” he said. 

“Artemisinin right now works very well. It is the best weapon we have against the disease, and we need to keep it.”

Dr Miotto’s team sequenced the genomes of 800 malaria-causing parasites from around the world. The scientists found three distinct groups of drug-resistant parasites in Cambodia, but said they did not yet know exactly how the parasites had mutated to withstand artemisinin.

“When we compared the DNA of the parasites in Cambodia, they seem to have formed some new populations that we have not really seen elsewhere,” Dr Miotto said.

Dr Miotto said that understanding the genetic fingerprint of the parasites would help scientists spot and track these strains if they spread further.


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littlebytesnews's curator insight, April 29, 2013 8:47 PM

Time to lift the ban on DDT and stop the spread of this disease before it comes to America. Another reason we need to control our borders and limit who comes here. 

We eradicated third world diseases with immunizations and other proper health and hygiene advances, people who come here from third world countries are a national security threat to our health as well as our country.

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Eau de Manipulation: Malaria Infected Mosquitoes Express Enhanced Attraction to Human Odor

Eau de Manipulation: Malaria Infected Mosquitoes Express Enhanced Attraction to Human Odor | Work interest | Scoop.it

Responsible for the most dangerous kind of malaria and at least half of malaria cases worldwide, Plasmodium falciprum is estimated to kill somewhere between 500,000 and 1 million people every year. In recent years, the parasite has developed resistance to many of our best treatments, leaving doctors without options in the over one hundred countries where malaria is endemic. While scientists continue to research new means of treatment from vaccines to drugs, nations struggling with malaria have shifted focus to prevention. Recently, this means scientists have become particularly interested in mosquito behavior to develop better, cost-effective control mechanisms. But a new study in PLoS ONE today suggests we know less than we might have thought, and that the parasite may be influencing its host mosquitos in ways we never even imagined.

 

“So far, most studies of Anopheles gambiae mosquito behavior have been conducted with uninfected mosquitoes,” write the authors, “but our data demonstrate that such results may not be representative of infected mosquitoes.” Previous studies found that Plasmodium-infected mosquitosprobe skin more, bite more often and ingest larger meals than uninfected ones, but the scientific team comprised of scientists from the Netherlands, United Kingdom, and United States wondered whether infected mosquitos behave differently before they land.

 

Many parasites with multiple hosts are known to alter one hosts’ behavior to increase transmission to the next. Toxoplasma gondii, for example, suppresses rats’ fear of cats by altering how they respond to feline smells. The research team wondered if Plasmodium could control mosquitos along the same lines, so they tested how uninfected and infected mosquitos reacted to the scent of human skin. Their results were staggeringly significant. Infected Anopheles mosquitos landed on the human-scented surface more than three times as often as non-infected mosquitos. “These results suggest that malaria-infectious females are more attracted to human odors than uninfected mosquitoes,” write the authors. “This is the first indication of a change in [mosquito] behavior in response to human odor, caused by infection with P. falciparum.”

 

The authors hope this research spurs further study into the ways in whichPlasmodium alters mosquito senses. New types of attractant smells, for example, could lead to breakthroughs in trapping technology and provide powerful allies in the struggle against malaria.


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Cartoon Physics - Protein Folding

Cartoon Physics - Protein Folding | Work interest | Scoop.it
“ RT @StangJared: I learned something about protein folding, @cartoon_physics: http://t.co/cVc9EwE0Dy Thank you!”
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Les médias célèbrent le « succès » du vaccin expérimental contre la malaria tout en ignorant ses effets secondaires mortels

Les grands médias sont en effervescence et s'excitent à propos de la dernière proposition de GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) sur un essai de vaccin contre le paludisme qui, selon la compagnie, réduit le risque de paludisme clinique et grave chez l'enfant de respectivement 56 pour cent et 47 pour cent. Mais ce que GSK et les médias sont omis de mentionner, ce sont les effets secondaires mortels qui peuvent accompagner ce vaccin...
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Scientists uncover potential malaria vaccine candidate - GMA News

“ Scientists uncover potential malaria vaccine candidate GMA News WASHINGTON - Researchers have discovered an antibody-generating protein that could help prevent multiplication of malaria parasites inside the body, giving new hope for a vaccine, a...”
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Interview d'Aurore Vaitinadapoullé, Talent d'Outre-Mer 2013

Interview d'Aurore Vaitinadapoullé, Talent d'Outre-Mer 2013 | Work interest | Scoop.it
“Aujourd'hui je fais ma thèse sur : Les protéines de la membrane du globule rouges impliquées dans l'infection paludique (Malaria) : VDAC et TSPO. Dans le cadre de cette thèse je continue ma collaboration initiée lors de ...”
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Rescooped by Aurore from Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca
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Bioinformatician's Pocket Reference !!

Bioinformatician's Pocket Reference !! | Work interest | Scoop.it
“ It is amusing how brain of bioinformaticians work! Learning a new programming language for days feels so much of fun that making 5 minute discussion with neighbours (unless under special cir...”
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Computational Investigation of SENP:SUMO Protein‒Protein Interaction for Structure Based Drug Design

Computational Investigation of SENP:SUMO Protein‒Protein Interaction for Structure Based Drug Design | Work interest | Scoop.it
“ Abstract SUMO specific proteases (SENPs) are cysteine proteases that carry out the proteolytic processing of SUMO from its pro form as well as its deconjugation from substrate proteins.”
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RNAseqViewer: visualization tool for RNA-Seq data

RNAseqViewer: visualization tool for RNA-Seq data | Work interest | Scoop.it
Summary: With the advances of RNA sequencing technologies, scientists need new tools to analyze transcriptome data. We introduce RNAseqViewer, a new visualization tool dedicated to RNA-Seq data. The program offers innovative ways to represent transcriptome data for single or multiple samples. It is a handy tool for scientists who use RNA-Seq data to compare multiple transcriptomes, for example, to compare gene expression and alternative splicing of cancer samples or of different development stages.
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Physicochemical bases for protein folding, dynamics, and protein-ligand binding

Physicochemical bases for protein folding, dynamics, and protein-ligand binding | Work interest | Scoop.it

Abstract Proteins are essential parts of living organisms and participate in virtually every process within cells. As the genomic sequences for increasing number of organisms are completed, research into how proteins can perform such a variety of functions has become much more intensive because the value of the genomic sequences relies on the accuracy of understanding the encoded gene products. Although the static three-dimensional structures of many proteins are known, the functions of proteins are ultimately governed by their dynamic characteristics, including the folding process, conformational fluctuations, molecular motions, and protein-ligand interactions. In this review, the physicochemical principles underlying these dynamic processes are discussed in depth based on the free energy landscape (FEL) theory. Questions of why and how proteins fold into their native conformational states, why proteins are inherently dynamic, and how their dynamic personalities govern protein functions are answered. This paper will contribute to the understanding of structure-function relationship of proteins in the post-genome era of life science research.


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PALUDISME: Identification de 3 formes de résistance chez P. falciparum

PALUDISME: Identification de 3 formes de résistance chez P. falciparum | Work interest | Scoop.it

Le développement de la résistance chez certaines souches du parasite Plasmodium falciparum, aux anti-paludiques comme l'artémisinine, pourrait être dévastateur, alertent à nouveau ces scientifiques de l'Université d'Oxford qui viennent d'identifier...


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PALUDISME: Identification de 3 formes de résistance chez P. falciparum

PALUDISME: Identification de 3 formes de résistance chez P. falciparum | Work interest | Scoop.it

Le développement de la résistance chez certaines souches du parasite Plasmodium falciparum, aux anti-paludiques comme l'artémisinine, pourrait être dévastateur, alertent à nouveau ces scientifiques de l'Université d'Oxford qui viennent d'identifier...

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Rescooped by Aurore from Science News
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HHMI -- Life Cycle of Malaria Parasite in Human Host

This amazing animation, developed with support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, shows exactly what happens when a malaria-carrying mosquito bites a human host. The parasite enters the bloodstream, multiplies in the liver cells, and is then released back into the bloodstream, where it infects and destroys red blood cells.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Brice Gottesman's curator insight, September 19, 2014 1:33 PM

The parasite enters the bloodstream, multiplies in the liver cells, and is then released back into the bloodstream, where it infects and destroys red blood cells.