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Teaching Empathy Inc: David Levine | Community building techniques for the classrom

Teaching Empathy Inc: David Levine | Community building techniques for the classrom | Word Waltz | Scoop.it

David Levine offers online classes and conferences about Personal Development & Coaching, Personal Development & Coaching, Interpersonal Communication. 

 

In this specialty session, David will present how to implement three specific classroom/culture building tools from his book Building Classroom Communities: The Listening Wheel, The Fishbowl, and The Community Meeting. Conflict resolution, planning and problem solving will also be explored. Although this service is offered on-line, you may wish to contact David through his Learn It LIve Inbox and request a workshop on-site for you school.


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4 great infographics about self-publishing | Ebook Friendly

4 great infographics about self-publishing | Ebook Friendly | Word Waltz | Scoop.it
Infographics are a fantastic way to provide a lot of useful information in an attractive, attention-keeping form.

 

Great information, easily understood here. Learn at the link! ~Chazz


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The 50 best children's apps for smartphones and tablets

The 50 best children's apps for smartphones and tablets | Word Waltz | Scoop.it
Adults are starting to trust their kids with their smartphones, but can children trust the grown-ups to download the best apps?

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Write Place, Write Time

Write Place, Write Time | Word Waltz | Scoop.it
If you look at anything long enough, say just that wall in front of you -- it will come out of that...

 

 

_______________

Interesting concept

 

I was intrigued as I viewed this collection of photos of writers' places. And, I couldn't help remembering the "rule" I was led to believe, though I was never very good at obeying it, that children should have a specific environment suitable for doing homework. It always included a "well-lighted desk" in a quiet place. And, heaven forbid there were distractions like music or television (remember when that was pretty much a complete list of possible distractions?).

 

As I contemplated these photos, I couldn't help but cheer a bit for those writers who worked in spaces more like the space I work in now that I get to adjust my personal rule set as I wish.

 

Yet at the same time, I felt a respect for those who prefer the tidier place. And, I am reminded thereby of the wonderful diversity of learners in my charge. For example, I always despised group work as a student, well at least after I'd reached the point where I felt the rewards of showing off what I knew or how clever my sense of humor could be, were worth pursuing. And, as a teacher it was easy to spot the students who felt the same way I had at the mention of group work. But, I also saw that many students do thrive in group work. Probably, depending upon the skill of the group management strategies in place, more students thrived, and more ideas were generated than not. But, I realized that I had to be cautious about assuming that one student's comfort zone was not a zone of agonizing annoyance for another.

 

BTW... it was the same with "warm up activities." You know, those attempts to instantly create a comfort with complete strangers who happened to sign up for or be required to attend the same workshop you happened to sign up for or be required to attend? But, I also know that some truly benefit from a transition activity from being in a room full of complete strangers to at least recognizing one or two people with whom a sense of security can be felt.

 

Yeah, yeah, so I'm happy to see that writers are people of many minds when they get to design their own places where they are doing what they really want to be doing.

 

Some of the ideas that passed through my mind as I looked at the places...


•  People who write often surround themselves with books; yet some do not.


• Some like cozy spaces, others prefer the austere. 


• I saw lots of Macs & several PCs and... I saw very few typewriters or pencil jars? How many typewriters can you find in this collection of images? (hint: there are several actually)


• Way more windowed than windowless spaces. Windows were frequently not only my distraction, but also my "space" for extended thinking about ideas. In that sense, the space beyond my space was where my visual attention could "unfocus" while I gave my mental attention room to focus for extended periods. I actually flashed back to a personal experience in school where I was reprimanded for "staring out the window" when I should have been paying attention and realizing that I had drifted not away from the topic under discussion, but more deeply into thinking about the very idea under discussion that I dwelt upon it a bit longer than the time period that the teacher had alloted for thinking about what she was teaching at us. 

 

• Lottsa Tchotchkes (spelled variously) You know..  small toys, gewgaws, knickknacks, swags, baubles, thingamajigs, doodads, trinkets, or kitsch. The kinds of things we would normally think of as  worthless junk, but we keep them, cherish them. Often thought of as dust collectors, they always survive "the annual spring cleaning; those bursts of belief that we can get back in control of the clutter while knowing full well that ... well, I ought not be making the assumption that what is true for me is TRUTH for all.

 

• Speaking of Tchotchkes, closely related, though not usually composed of worthless junk, there are lots of mini-shrines like variations of Zen Gardens of inspiration. 

 

• animals! stuffed or otherwise (can you find the moose head?). Other life or life-like forms to "be with" while writing while not necessarily having to pay any attention whatsoever to them. 

 

As an educator, I guess I found myself contemplating that yin and yang situation that I often found myself thinking about where rules and policies had (for good reasons) to co-exist with the "creative possibilities" of escaping too much standardization of thinking.

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

 

 


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Borges: An Unquenchable Gaiety of Mind

Borges: An Unquenchable Gaiety of Mind | Word Waltz | Scoop.it

On visits to Cambridge University late in life, Jorge Luis Borges offered revealing last thoughts about his reading and writing.


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Five Regional Literary Masterpieces | SEE a fortnight in Review

Five Regional Literary Masterpieces | SEE a fortnight in Review | Word Waltz | Scoop.it

Literature is a thing that has no homeland other than its reader, which is why we choose to recommend only the authors who are, though for different reasons, truly international. Human rights activists, political dissidents, solitary cyclists, magic realists, hyperrealists – they’re all there. And we shall insist that you read them, not necessarily that you should tell others to read them. Let others have their romance novels, Dan Browns, tourist guides and suchlike, and know that you have become a member of a selective community, a community of those who can read and those who do not necessarily know, but who at least wish to know. Also, do not forget that as much as an author may seek to have an ever increasing audience, it is precisely the size of that audience that may get in the way of writing. It is for this reason that it is quite inappropriate to state whether a writer is famous or not, since his or her literary skill is a far more important thing, as posterity, not the present, has always had such a penchant for showing.


Via Mary Daniels Brown
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Personalization vs Differentiation vs Individualization

Personalization vs Differentiation vs Individualization | Word Waltz | Scoop.it
Barbara Bray and Kathleen McClaskey developed a chart that explains the differences between personalization, differentiation, and individualization.

 

Read more, very interesting...:

http://barbarabray.net/2012/01/22/personalization-vs-differentiation-vs-individualization-chart/

 


Via Gust MEES, Lawrence Buck
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Extremely proud of my professor in DLSU, Dr. Marj! - Filipino poet joins UK Cultural Olympiad - ABS CBN News

Extremely proud of my professor in DLSU, Dr. Marj! - Filipino poet joins UK Cultural Olympiad - ABS CBN News | Word Waltz | Scoop.it
Filipino poet joins UK Cultural Olympiad ABS CBN News

 

“It’s exhilarating, except there is maybe a problem with representation. I don’t think one poet can represent the richness and the variety of Philippine literature and the traditions. I’m lucky that I’m the one, but I wish I could bring more Filipino poets,…”

 

Other articles on Marjorie Evasco on this site: http://goo.gl/W4k87

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Classical literature “gamified” to encourage children to read - Oxford Student

Classical literature “gamified” to encourage children to read - Oxford Student | Word Waltz | Scoop.it
Classical literature “gamified” to encourage children to read Oxford Student SecretBuilders, the developer, will introduce characters and plots in digital format, with the aim of engaging children and teenagers up to the age of 15 in classical...

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Does Money Make Us Write Better? by Tim Parks | NYRblog | The New York Review of Books

Does Money Make Us Write Better? by Tim Parks | NYRblog | The New York Review of Books | Word Waltz | Scoop.it

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10 Terrific iPad Apps for Toddlers

10 Terrific iPad Apps for Toddlers | Word Waltz | Scoop.it

From musical experimentation to a digital doll house, these 10 iPad apps are the perfect mix of educational and fun.


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Teaching Empathy Inc: David Levine | Community building techniques for the classrom

Teaching Empathy Inc: David Levine | Community building techniques for the classrom | Word Waltz | Scoop.it

David Levine offers online classes and conferences about Personal Development & Coaching, Personal Development & Coaching, Interpersonal Communication. 

 

In this specialty session, David will present how to implement three specific classroom/culture building tools from his book Building Classroom Communities: The Listening Wheel, The Fishbowl, and The Community Meeting. Conflict resolution, planning and problem solving will also be explored. Although this service is offered on-line, you may wish to contact David through his Learn It LIve Inbox and request a workshop on-site for you school.


Via Edwin Rutsch, Lawrence Buck
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Guest Essay: ‘Why Philippine Speculative Fiction’ by Charles Tan | Suvudu

Guest Essay: ‘Why Philippine Speculative Fiction’ by Charles Tan | Suvudu | Word Waltz | Scoop.it

“There’s something apropos with me posting here at Suvudu. The first adult fantasy books I read were those published by Del Rey Books, and they were quite influential: The Heritage of Shannara series by Terry Brooks and the Belgariad series by David Eddings. They had memorable characters such as the enigmatic Walker Boh or the crafty Silk. There was this sense of gravity as The Sword of Shannara forced its users to confront deception, especially self-deception.

 

These books, while entertaining, made me realize that there was more to fantasy; not escapism, but kernels of truth that define us and our world.”

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Five Regional Literary Masterpieces | SEE a fortnight in Review

Five Regional Literary Masterpieces | SEE a fortnight in Review | Word Waltz | Scoop.it

Literature is a thing that has no homeland other than its reader, which is why we choose to recommend only the authors who are, though for different reasons, truly international. Human rights activists, political dissidents, solitary cyclists, magic realists, hyperrealists – they’re all there. And we shall insist that you read them, not necessarily that you should tell others to read them. Let others have their romance novels, Dan Browns, tourist guides and suchlike, and know that you have become a member of a selective community, a community of those who can read and those who do not necessarily know, but who at least wish to know. Also, do not forget that as much as an author may seek to have an ever increasing audience, it is precisely the size of that audience that may get in the way of writing. It is for this reason that it is quite inappropriate to state whether a writer is famous or not, since his or her literary skill is a far more important thing, as posterity, not the present, has always had such a penchant for showing.


Via Mary Daniels Brown
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Home | Cambridge ESOL Teacher Support

Home | Cambridge ESOL Teacher Support | Word Waltz | Scoop.it
Cambridge ESOL Teacher Support provides a wide range of teaching resources and information to support ESOL-qualified teachers. A free account gives access to ESOL-endorsed materials, user-submitted resources and our lively teacher community!

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