Womens' Suffrage and 19th Ammendment
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Africa and Information and Communications Technology Growth | The Energy Collective

Africa and Information and Communications Technology Growth | The Energy Collective | Womens' Suffrage and 19th Ammendment | Scoop.it
Before the advent of the modern communication, humankind was limited to either word of mouth or protracted written communication sent over land or sea.

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History of Women's Suffrage | Scholastic.com

History of Women's Suffrage | Scholastic.com | Womens' Suffrage and 19th Ammendment | Scoop.it
Learn about the history of women's struggle for equal rights to vote.
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The Nineteenth Amendment

The Nineteenth Amendment | Womens' Suffrage and 19th Ammendment | Scoop.it
This page includes materials relating to the controversy surrounding the Nineteenth Amendment to the U. S. Constitution.
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Woman - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A woman (/ˈwʊmən/), pl: women (/ˈwɪmɨn/) is a female human. The term woman is usually reserved for an adult, with the term girl being the usual term for a female child or adolescent. However, the term woman is also sometimes used to identify a female human, regardless of age, as in phrases such as "Women's rights". Women are typically capable of giving birth, though older women who have gone through Menopause, some intersex women, and transgender women are not.

In Old English, wīfmann meant "female human", whereas wēr meant "male human". Mann or monn had a gender-neutral meaning of "human", corresponding to Modern English "person" or "someone", however subsequent to the Norman Conquest, man began to be used more in reference to "male human", and by the late 1200s had begun to eclipse usage of the older term wēr.[1] The medial labial consonants f and m in wīfmann coalesced into the modern form "woman", while the initial element, which meant "female," underwent semantic narrowing to the sense of a married woman ("wife"). It is a popular misconception that the term "woman" is etymologically connected with "womb", which is from a separate Old English word, wambe meaning "stomach" (of male or female). Nevertheless, such a false derivation of "woman" has appeared in print.[2]

A very common Indo-European root for woman, *gwen-, is the source of modern English "queen" (Old English cwēn had primarily meant woman, highborn or not; this is still the case in Danish, with the modern spelling kvinde, as well as in Swedish kvinna). The word gynaecology is also derived from the Ancient Greek cognate γυνή gynē, woman. Other English words traceable to the same Indo-European root include banshee "fairy woman" (from Irish bean "woman" and "fairy") and zenana (from Persian زن zan).[3]

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Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Preamble
Articles of the Constitution

Bill of Rights

Subsequent Amendments

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Woman suffrage amendment ratified — History.com This Day in History — 8/18/1920

Woman suffrage amendment ratified — History.com This Day in History — 8/18/1920 | Womens' Suffrage and 19th Ammendment | Scoop.it
The 19th Amendment to the Constitution, guaranteeing women the right to vote, is ratified by Tennessee, giving it the two-thirds majority of state ratification necessary to make it the law of the land.
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Women's Suffrage | Scholastic.com

Women's Suffrage | Scholastic.com | Womens' Suffrage and 19th Ammendment | Scoop.it
Explore the history of women's suffrage with interactive maps and quizzes. Plus, discover Effie Hobby, who remembers voting in the first U.S. presidential election open to women, just over 80 years ago.
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