History:Why use a textbook?
64 views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Geography Education
onto History:Why use a textbook?
Scoop.it!

Puzzle: Put the Congressional Districts Back Together

Puzzle: Put the Congressional Districts Back Together | History:Why use a textbook? | Scoop.it

Gerrymandering is the practice of redrawing congressional districts after a decadal census to favor one political party over the other.


Via Seth Dixon
Dennis V Thomas's insight:

Do these look like they are contiguous and compact? Many of the issues in the House of Reps is that districts have been created that are super majority for one party and the only competition is in the primary. This creates extremism and diminishes the opportunity for dialog. Only radicles can be elected in the primary election and those that represent the majority are defeated. One great example was Dick Lugar in Indiana.

more...
Noel Magee's curator insight, April 11, 2015 8:07 PM

This short, simple depiction of gerrymandering serves a strong message. Congressional districts have literally been turned into a jigsaw puzzle. While we can all agree that it is nice to have votes in our own favor, it is unfair to allow political parties to divide up the United States unfairly. It is imperative that such an important decision be fair and justifiable. For the good or our nation, gerrymandering needs to be controlled. When it comes to elections, the United States should be divided fairly and properly. Any altering of the district lines should be considered unethical, immoral, and should be made known to the public so they can decide what should be done. This type of decision affects every single individual living in America, and this should be the least of our worries. It may be beneficial to political parties at the time, but the changing of these should be an eye opener of the type of congressional "leaders" that we look to to make executive decision regarding the rest of our lives. 

 

*Module 7

Alexa Earl's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:51 PM

This showed me how unfair gerrymandering is and how it is a total false representation of what the people want. This diagram not only showed me how it works but it also showed me how it is so unfair...

Kristen Trammell's curator insight, May 26, 2015 7:36 PM

I. Gerrymandering is the practice of redrawing congressional districts after a decadal census to favor one political party over the other. In this puzzle, the user has to place the congressional districts onto the state/county. 

 

II. I liked this puzzle. I thought it illustrated the oddity of the redrawn districts and highlighted the unfairness of the voting system. The weird shapes of the districts showed how hard the political officials would try to get a voting area where they would be supported. The unfairness is also illustrated with the idea that the congressional districts can be put into a puzzle, where a fair district would be shaped like rectangles or equally sized squares. 

History:Why use a textbook?
Historic events shaping the lives of women
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Dennis V Thomas
Scoop.it!

The War of 1812: Arrogant Worms Song - YouTube

clean version
Dennis V Thomas's insight:

show this and Johnny Horton's version for some laughs....and critical historic thought!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dennis V Thomas
Scoop.it!

6 Historical Figures Who May or May Not Have Existed — HISTORY Lists

6 Historical Figures Who May or May Not Have Existed — HISTORY Lists | History:Why use a textbook? | Scoop.it
From Britain’s most beloved outlaw to the founder of Sparta, find out more about six historical figures whose existence remains up for debate.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dennis V Thomas
Scoop.it!

NPR : The Middle East and the West, A Troubled History

NPR : The Middle East and the West, A Troubled History | History:Why use a textbook? | Scoop.it
In a six-part series, The Middle East and the West, A Troubled History, NPR's Mike Shuster examines the nearly 1,000-year history of Western involvement in the Middle East.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from U.S HISTORY SHACK : MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

The Diverse Ancestry Of The United States

The Diverse Ancestry Of The United States | History:Why use a textbook? | Scoop.it
The ancestry of the people of the United States is widely varied and includes descendants of populations from around the world. In addition to its var ...

Via Emre Erdogan, Bonnie Bracey Sutton, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Dennis V Thomas's insight:

A nation of immigrants...  

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from History and Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

Make Social Studies Come Alive with Web Maps

Make Social Studies Come Alive with Web Maps | History:Why use a textbook? | Scoop.it

"Web maps can transform subjects such as geography, history, and civics from long reading assignments into visual learning experiences."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 29, 2013 3:53 PM

I'm a believer in using Web Maps in my geography courses and I think that is fairly obvious why.  This article expands the uses of web maps beyond just the geography classroom to all the social studies.  Thanks to Joseph Kerski, one of the best advocates that GIS educators could ever have, for writing this article.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, June 4, 2015 3:33 PM

If Dr. Dixon likes it, it must be good!

Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Puzzle: Put the Congressional Districts Back Together

Puzzle: Put the Congressional Districts Back Together | History:Why use a textbook? | Scoop.it

Gerrymandering is the practice of redrawing congressional districts after a decadal census to favor one political party over the other.


Via Seth Dixon
Dennis V Thomas's insight:

Do these look like they are contiguous and compact? Many of the issues in the House of Reps is that districts have been created that are super majority for one party and the only competition is in the primary. This creates extremism and diminishes the opportunity for dialog. Only radicles can be elected in the primary election and those that represent the majority are defeated. One great example was Dick Lugar in Indiana.

more...
Noel Magee's curator insight, April 11, 2015 8:07 PM

This short, simple depiction of gerrymandering serves a strong message. Congressional districts have literally been turned into a jigsaw puzzle. While we can all agree that it is nice to have votes in our own favor, it is unfair to allow political parties to divide up the United States unfairly. It is imperative that such an important decision be fair and justifiable. For the good or our nation, gerrymandering needs to be controlled. When it comes to elections, the United States should be divided fairly and properly. Any altering of the district lines should be considered unethical, immoral, and should be made known to the public so they can decide what should be done. This type of decision affects every single individual living in America, and this should be the least of our worries. It may be beneficial to political parties at the time, but the changing of these should be an eye opener of the type of congressional "leaders" that we look to to make executive decision regarding the rest of our lives. 

 

*Module 7

Alexa Earl's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:51 PM

This showed me how unfair gerrymandering is and how it is a total false representation of what the people want. This diagram not only showed me how it works but it also showed me how it is so unfair...

Kristen Trammell's curator insight, May 26, 2015 7:36 PM

I. Gerrymandering is the practice of redrawing congressional districts after a decadal census to favor one political party over the other. In this puzzle, the user has to place the congressional districts onto the state/county. 

 

II. I liked this puzzle. I thought it illustrated the oddity of the redrawn districts and highlighted the unfairness of the voting system. The weird shapes of the districts showed how hard the political officials would try to get a voting area where they would be supported. The unfairness is also illustrated with the idea that the congressional districts can be put into a puzzle, where a fair district would be shaped like rectangles or equally sized squares. 

Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from History and Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

The Entire History of the World—Really, All of It—Distilled Into a Single Gorgeous Chart

The Entire History of the World—Really, All of It—Distilled Into a Single Gorgeous Chart | History:Why use a textbook? | Scoop.it
This “Histomap,” created by John B. Sparks, was first printed by Rand McNally in 1931. (The David Rumsey Map Collection hosts a fully zoomable version here.)

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Shelby Redman's curator insight, December 2, 2013 2:23 PM

This is really neat

Joshua Lefkowitz's curator insight, January 24, 2014 7:38 PM

Often times I find it hard to think of history as simply a recolection of time. Youspend your childhood looking at timelines and learning history linearly you often forget that this is not the case. I found this work to be very asthetically pleasing and helpful as well.

Joshua Lefkowitz's curator insight, January 24, 2014 7:55 PM

Often times I find it hard to think of history as simply a recolection of time. Youspend your childhood looking at timelines and learning history linearly you often forget that this is not the case. I found this work to be very asthetically pleasing and helpful as well.

Scooped by Dennis V Thomas
Scoop.it!

American History at Glasgow University - Course Details

American History at Glasgow University - Course Details | History:Why use a textbook? | Scoop.it
American History at Glasgow University, Level 2. An online resource.
Dennis V Thomas's insight:

Great Course on Civil Liberties.  Wonderful activites and highly organizied lessons and questions to guide students and teachers.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dennis V Thomas
Scoop.it!

News

News | History:Why use a textbook? | Scoop.it

Acanthus Education assists teachers and students learn more about economic freedom. We offer a variety of instructional resources and sponsor events that integrate ethics, philosophy, and economics, suitable for public and religiously affiliated schools.We offer free down loadable lessons, scholarly papers, and articles online for secondary social studies teachers and students. Acanthus Education also offers programs in the form of teacher workshops and conferences for public and private schools.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dennis V Thomas
Scoop.it!

The Spread of U.S. Slavery, 1790–1860

An interactive map showing how slavery
spread across the United States.
Dennis V Thomas's insight:

Manifest Destiny paired with the other founding American institution 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dennis V Thomas
Scoop.it!

A Green Revolution, This Time for Africa

A Green Revolution, This Time for Africa | History:Why use a textbook? | Scoop.it
High-yield wheat and rice produced dramatic gains in harvests in Asia and Latin America. Is it Africa’s turn now?
Dennis V Thomas's insight:

Outstanding article for Agriculture review.  

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from History and Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

European History Interactive Map

European History Interactive Map | History:Why use a textbook? | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ms. Harrington's curator insight, August 10, 2013 7:51 PM

So many uses!

Lola Jennings- Edquist's curator insight, August 12, 2013 3:56 AM

What an awesome map! A great resource for teaching kids history- and making it simple to understand, as well as interactive. Can be used in conjunction with the 'Protest Sites' map I scooped above; in a unit on protests and change around the world. 

 

I think it links to most areas of Humanities, which is cool. I showed it to some of the kids from placement and they loved it! 

Al Picozzi's curator insight, August 13, 2013 8:28 PM

Great Quick tool to use and very informative.

Scooped by Dennis V Thomas
Scoop.it!

World historgram

World historgram | History:Why use a textbook? | Scoop.it
TOUCH this image to discover its story. Image tagging powered by ThingLink
Dennis V Thomas's insight:

Graphically displays the rise and fall of the world empires.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dennis V Thomas
Scoop.it!

27 Maps That Show How Totally Messed Up American E…

27 Maps That Show How Totally Messed Up American E… | History:Why use a textbook? | Scoop.it
So are you saying that right or wrong? All maps by Joshua Katz , based on a survey by Bert Vaux . You can read all 122 maps here .
Dennis V Thomas's insight:

I speak American.... how about yins?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dennis V Thomas
Scoop.it!

Declaration of Independence - ISI's Faculty Resource Center

Declaration of Independence - ISI's Faculty Resource Center | History:Why use a textbook? | Scoop.it
Dennis V Thomas's insight:

Outstanding resource list for teaching the Declaration.  

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Southmoore AP United States History
Scoop.it!

The Civil War: Battle of Stones River | C-SPAN

The Civil War: Battle of Stones River | C-SPAN | History:Why use a textbook? | Scoop.it
Portions from a symposium marking the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Stones River, which was fought near Murfreesboro, Tennessee, from December 31st, 1862 through January 2nd, 1863.

Via Mr. David Burton
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dennis V Thomas
Scoop.it!

Browse All Projects, Women and Social Movements in the United States

Browse All Projects, Women and Social Movements in the United States | History:Why use a textbook? | Scoop.it

A collection of documents organized with specfic objectives and summaries to use as unites or individual lessons.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dennis V Thomas
Scoop.it!

19th Amendment: Women's Suffrage

19th Amendment: Women's Suffrage | History:Why use a textbook? | Scoop.it

92 years ago today, women gained the right to vote in the United States.  Here is a link to the documents that made this happen .

 

 

more...
No comment yet.