Women on the Homefront during WW2
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Connection to today 2: Girl power

Connection to today 2: Girl power | Women on the Homefront during WW2 | Scoop.it
SITTING around a restaurant table, six workers discuss the progress of their labour action. Five of them are women, as are most of their several hundred colleagues...
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In this article women in Guangdong out number men in labor working factories such as the toy factory. Thirty percent of China's exports are made here. Women here are far more uneducated in this country. Women are almost more than a year behind the men of this country. Although women are far more behind in education, factory owners beg the women to stay working in them. 

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Erica Benson's comment, February 9, 2014 12:03 PM
Interesting!
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Connection To Today 1: Manufacturing is not for women

Connection To Today 1: Manufacturing is not for women | Women on the Homefront during WW2 | Scoop.it
Even as industry expands, women are losing factory jobs. Why? Even researchers are baffled.
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Erica Benson's comment, February 9, 2014 12:03 PM
Your insight?
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Primary Source 1: "A Woman Worthwhile"--Letters from the Homefront

Primary Source 1: "A Woman Worthwhile"--Letters from the Homefront | Women on the Homefront during WW2 | Scoop.it
AOHP note: "Jane Doe" and I never spoke about her mother's letters. She just handed them straight over to me one day, almost as an afterthought, and told me I could use them for a book--if I cared ...
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This article is an amazing but sad story. During World War II there were a lot of sacrefices and decisions that many women had to make.  This woman in particular known as, Jane's Mother, most likely has made the worst decision that she is now going to regret doing. Jane's mother abandoned her child at an orphanage. There is not a specific reason she did this to her daughter. He daughter is known as a illegitimate child which means her parents are not married. However Jane's mother looks back on this and says that God has already forgiven her for it. She writes letters to her daughter hoping that she can get forgiveness from everyone else. 

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Erica Benson's comment, February 9, 2014 12:06 PM
I appreciate you presenting a different perspective and story about a woman during The War.
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Secondary Source 1: American Women in WWII on the Homefront and Beyond .pdf

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In this PDF created by The National WWII Museum in New Orleans, Louisiana I learned a lot. Women sent their husbands away into the war, children to the grandmas and gave all of their energy to helping out in WWII. For the first time in history women were not known for just being housewives anymore. Women conducted traffic, worked in factories, rigged parachutes, flew military aircraft across the country and many more masculine jobs. Rosie the Riveter even made sure that our allies had the weapons and materials they needed to beat the axis powers. 

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Erica Benson's comment, February 9, 2014 12:08 PM
Great examples and detail.
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Primary Source2: Service on The Home Front

Primary Source2: Service on The Home Front | Women on the Homefront during WW2 | Scoop.it
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World War II had an impact not only on the United States but the whole world as well. All of the men and women pitched in and put forth the war effort. Women even stepped out of thier comfort zone and took jobs in factories, on roadways, and even in the war itself. This flyer and or poster represents the Civilians in Pennsylvania. In my eyes this poster is encouraging everyone to get invovled in the war effort. Wether you are a child or a senior. This poster also represents the stregnth of this state in the United States and how much they put into the WWII effort. To be quite honest it is amazing. 

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Primary Source 3: Rosie the Riveter: Women Working During World War II

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Rosie the Riveter was an amazing woman that was a role model for all women during WWII. In this document it talks about how women survived being ridiculed and earned their spot in the work world. I used to think Rosie the Riveter was actually real. Rosie the Riveter was a fictional character that the propaganda campaign created. She was shown off as the ideal working woman and she was inspirational. Women were not taken seriously during WWII but eventually earned their spot. Although women worked for their spot when the men came back from the war they were sadly forced out of their jobs to go back home.

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Erica Benson's comment, February 9, 2014 12:05 PM
Where is the primary source?
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Secondary Source 3: Overview - Women and the Home Front During World War II - Research Guides at Minnesota Historical Society Library

Secondary Source 3: Overview - Women and the Home Front During World War II - Research Guides at Minnesota Historical Society Library | Women on the Homefront during WW2 | Scoop.it
Research Guides. Women and the Home Front During World War II. Overview.
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On this website I learned a lot about Minnesota’s women and how much they contributed to WWII. Only one third of Minnesota’s women went to work. The other two thirds did a lot of volunteering for Red Cross or sold military bonds. When the women’s sons, fathers, and husbands were drafted they were left in charge of the farms and the up keeps of cars and houses. Women who were employed only had their jobs for the time being of WWII and had to give their jobs back to the men when they came back.

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Secondary Source 2: The U.S. Home Front During World War II

Secondary Source 2: The U.S. Home Front During World War II | Women on the Homefront during WW2 | Scoop.it
During World War II every aspect of American life was impacted, from ordinary daily routines to the role and content of popular entertainment.
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There were a lot of Americans in the U.S. that were having a big bowl of emotions when WWII broke out. The Japanese Americans especially felt this way and felt segregated once again. Japanese Americans had to live in special types of camps or they went to prison while World War 2 lasted. When the World War 2 occurred Americans started to ration food, gas, and clothes. Americans at this time also feared that if the Japanese could successfully attack Hawaii and kill innocent civilians, that they could potentially attack the main land of America to. 

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