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Women in the Ancient Mediterranean World

Women in the Ancient Mediterranean World | Women in Ancient History | Scoop.it

The status of women in ancient civilizations was dictated by religion and position, rarely impacting the everyday lives of everyday female interactions.

 

For the vast majority of women in the Ancient world, daily life revolved around the home as caretakers of children or household managers. Historians that cite examples of powerful women usually rely upon exceptional females, often associated with religious rituals such as the Oracle at Delphi or Rome’s Vestal Virgins. Although the Mediterranean pantheon of goddesses reflects power and cult-following, their example inspired upper class women as well as men, as in the case of the cult of Isis. The lives of everyday women were scarcely affected.


Via David Connolly
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This scoop gives some insight on what it was like to be a women in the Ancient Mediterranean World. First of all, women were seen as subservient to males, they were in charge of being caretakers of children and to take care of the home. This scoop goes into depth of the few women in ancient history who had a higher status in women kind by being included in things men were such as poetry, politics and relgious events.

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Dave McMaster's curator insight, May 3, 2013 8:25 PM

This scoop would be valuable to students learning about the Ancient Mediterranean beliefs and values as it explains how women were seen and valued by men and the role in which they played in society.

Cassandra Folkerth's curator insight, September 28, 2013 5:10 PM

Its interesting to think about how the role of women is based entirely on the religion adopted by that society. If one society has a female god I believe that socitey would have more respect for the female gender. But many societies are quite patriarichal, therefore having more respect for the man than woman. 

Karina Moreno's curator insight, April 28, 11:38 PM

I  find it unreal that a lot of history do not mention women nor in many regions they were consider a citizens.  Back then they should have realized that women were that made everything happen.  A population of people wouldn't have been possible with women giving birth and raising to create who we are today.

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Rescooped by Sarah Kerr from Neolithic
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Archaeologists find prehistoric Romeo and Juliet locked in eternal embrace - USATODAY.com

Archaeologists find prehistoric Romeo and Juliet locked in eternal embrace - USATODAY.com | Women in Ancient History | Scoop.it
It could be humanity's oldest story of doomed love. Archaeologists have unearthed two skeletons from the Neolithic period locked in a tender embrace and buried outside Mantua, just 25 miles south of Verona, the romantic city where Shakespeare set...

Via Jahaiyra Albert
Sarah Kerr's insight:

I'm going to categorize this scoop under Women in Ancient History because, it is lovey-dovey. This scoop is about a grave site uncovered outside  Mantua. The two people buried are locked in a hugging embrace and are given the nickname of "Romeo and Juliet" just because the ancient story which takes place in Verona, Italy is just 25 miles from where this site was uncovered. 

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Jahaiyra Albert's curator insight, October 11, 2013 3:35 PM

This is just the cutest!

Patrick Kwong's curator insight, January 29, 2:16 PM

The article says that they are still wondering how they died. But even though we know how Romeo and Juliet die, this seems like an ancient predecessor for Shakespeare's classic.

Rescooped by Sarah Kerr from Archaeology News
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Female Gladiators? Tantalizing New Evidence From Ancient Rome

Female Gladiators? Tantalizing New Evidence From Ancient Rome | Women in Ancient History | Scoop.it
Female-gladiator fights appear to have been rare spectacles in the Roman Empire. But new analysis of a statue in a German museum adds to the evidence that trained women did fight to the death in ancient amphitheaters, ...

Via Paolo Barresi, David Connolly
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This scoop looks into an ancient artifact held in a German Museum in Hamburg that may prove evidences that women fought in battles in the Colessuem in Rome.

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Marshall Shogun Dore's curator insight, May 5, 2013 9:00 AM

How would this discovery impact on our understanding of the roles of women in ancient Rome?

What evidence suggest that the statue is a female gladiator?

Rescooped by Sarah Kerr from Archaeology News
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Women in the Ancient Mediterranean World

Women in the Ancient Mediterranean World | Women in Ancient History | Scoop.it

The status of women in ancient civilizations was dictated by religion and position, rarely impacting the everyday lives of everyday female interactions.

 

For the vast majority of women in the Ancient world, daily life revolved around the home as caretakers of children or household managers. Historians that cite examples of powerful women usually rely upon exceptional females, often associated with religious rituals such as the Oracle at Delphi or Rome’s Vestal Virgins. Although the Mediterranean pantheon of goddesses reflects power and cult-following, their example inspired upper class women as well as men, as in the case of the cult of Isis. The lives of everyday women were scarcely affected.


Via David Connolly
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This scoop gives some insight on what it was like to be a women in the Ancient Mediterranean World. First of all, women were seen as subservient to males, they were in charge of being caretakers of children and to take care of the home. This scoop goes into depth of the few women in ancient history who had a higher status in women kind by being included in things men were such as poetry, politics and relgious events.

more...
Dave McMaster's curator insight, May 3, 2013 8:25 PM

This scoop would be valuable to students learning about the Ancient Mediterranean beliefs and values as it explains how women were seen and valued by men and the role in which they played in society.

Cassandra Folkerth's curator insight, September 28, 2013 5:10 PM

Its interesting to think about how the role of women is based entirely on the religion adopted by that society. If one society has a female god I believe that socitey would have more respect for the female gender. But many societies are quite patriarichal, therefore having more respect for the man than woman. 

Karina Moreno's curator insight, April 28, 11:38 PM

I  find it unreal that a lot of history do not mention women nor in many regions they were consider a citizens.  Back then they should have realized that women were that made everything happen.  A population of people wouldn't have been possible with women giving birth and raising to create who we are today.

Rescooped by Sarah Kerr from Historical gastronomy
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A Mini Timeline of Ancient Foods

A Mini Timeline of Ancient Foods | Women in Ancient History | Scoop.it

DATELINE: 21K BCE………………………….SUBJECT: When did man first start grinding grains into cereal?


Old thinking was 10K BCE, but archaeologists at hunter-gatherer site Ohalo II in Israel turned up cereal grindings–mostly grass seeds including wild barley and emmer wheat–and burned stones that indicate these early peoples were making and baking bread long before they learned how to cultivate cereal grasses on their own. (Nature, reported in The Economist, 8/7/04) ...


Via Jozef Schildermans
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This scoop is about foods in ancient history, now with what I would think is that the  men would go and hunt and women would prepare the meals, so that is how this scoop is related to Women in Ancient History. This scoop goes into detail by answering questions about ancient food habits and methods.

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Rescooped by Sarah Kerr from Archaeology News
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Find of Roman statues 'important'

Find of Roman statues 'important' | Women in Ancient History | Scoop.it
Archaeologists in Italy say they have discovered what they've called a "very important" series of statues dating back to the Roman era, linked to the celebrated poet Ovid.

 

The seven figures were found in a villa outside the city owned by the patron of the celebrated poet, Ovid.

They depict one of the myths recounted in his masterpiece, Metamorphoses, that of the proud mother Niobe.

The team unearthed the 2m-high figures at the bottom of what would have been a richly-decorated swimming pool.

 


Via David Connolly
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David Connolly's curator insight, January 8, 2013 3:12 PM

My fave poet...  ( Roman one that is )

Louise Zarmati's curator insight, January 8, 2013 7:04 PM

My fave poet...  ( Roman one that is )

Rescooped by Sarah Kerr from Systems of Knowledge
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Were the First Artists Mostly Women?

Were the First Artists Mostly Women? | Women in Ancient History | Scoop.it
Three-quarters of handprints in ancient cave art were left by women, study finds. (Cave paintings made by women http://t.co/5t5gYJHxiJ)

Via Joseph Vancell
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This scoop investigates the possibility that in early cave-dwelling times, most of the hand paintings on cave walls were actually done by women when it was thought to be done predominantly by men. 

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Joseph Vancell's curator insight, October 9, 2013 10:15 AM
The first artists were mostly women not men!
Rescooped by Sarah Kerr from Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots
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Roman Catacombs Reopened Triggering Debate on Ancient Women Priests [PHOTOS]

Roman Catacombs Reopened Triggering Debate on Ancient Women Priests [PHOTOS] | Women in Ancient History | Scoop.it
The Catacomb of Priscilla was opened to visitors after a five-year restoration work on 19 November.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This scoop explores the roles that women may have had in the early Christian church era. Evidence found through frescos lead some think that women were preistesses in this age and others see the women as just an onlooker in the frescos. The true fact of whether or not women were a part of the early Christian church is still debatable to this day.

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Rescooped by Sarah Kerr from Women in ancient Greece
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Greek Women - Ancient Greece for Kids


Via Mr Farmer
Sarah Kerr's insight:

Even though this site is aimed towards kids, I found it very interesting on how women back in ancient Greece were viewed and treated. I think that this excerpt is helpful by being short and concise.

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Kristine Rapisura's curator insight, March 1, 2:10 AM

Women were treated very traditionally. They had to ask permission from their husbands if they wanted to leave the house for any reason. The only place they had freedom was the household as many of them usually stayed home. 

Rescooped by Sarah Kerr from Cultural Worldviews
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Roman mosaics and the dissemination of feminine stereotypes

Roman mosaics and the dissemination of feminine stereotypes | Women in Ancient History | Scoop.it
Researchers at Carlos III University in Madrid have announced that many Roman mosaics include references to women as the cause of wars and other evils.  The roles of women in the mosaic can be broken into three broad groups: familial (wife, mother,...

Via ramblejamble
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This scoop is about a Roman mosaic of how women are the reasons for wars and other evils. Only the rich were able to have mosaics in their homes so, the controversial mosiacs were attributed to the ideas of those who had the money and social class to have them built in their homes.

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Cindy Garcia's curator insight, October 19, 2013 6:50 AM

In this Article, Researches say that many of the Roman Mosaic reference that “Women were the cause of wars and other evils”.  The role of woman are broken into three roles domestic Housewife, erotic image, or a Mythological Figures. Only those with elite roles were able to have Mosaics in their homes. Those who had money and social status had mosaic built in their homes. ("Blog." Art of Counting Roman Mosaics and the Dissemination of Feminine Stereotypes Comments. N.p.,)

Cynia Sapp's curator insight, February 18, 11:14 PM

This Roman mosaic depicts feminine stereotypes. It is interesting how women are shown in most of these depicted. Women were supposedly the cause of wars and bad things that happened in a society. 

Rescooped by Sarah Kerr from Latin.resources.useful
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Life in Rome: Baths of Caracalla

Trinity Jackman, Classical Archaeologist, describes the massive bath and swim facilities of Ancient Rome. To learn more about the ancient empires of Rome, Nu...

Via Magisterc Lcjsms
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