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The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan

The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan | Women and Education in the Middle East | Scoop.it
In a country this battered, fractured, dysfunctional – how much can she really hope to achieve?

 

The issue of female education in Pakistan has exploded after Malala Yousafzai was attacked by the Taliban for publicly advocating for girls to receive more schooling.  This attack has lead several media outlets to take a more serious look at the gendered cultural and economic opportunities (or lack thereof) for girls within Pakistan.  This NPR podcast also speaks of the real options in front of so many girls like Malala and the cultural and political contexts within which they navigate their lives.

 

Tags: gender, South Asia, podcast, culture, Islam, development, unit 3 culture, education.


Via Seth Dixon
Shelby Porter's insight:

How much can one girl really do in trying to gain education for women in Pakistan? Well for starters, she has brought them hope. Hope for a better future, and hope for education in the future. She has started a revolution for her people and is not afraid to stand for what she believes should be allowed in her country. Knowledge is power, and she is fighting for every woman to gain knowledge and become a powerful member of their society. 

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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:09 PM

I really love this article because the young girl being interviewed is angry and has had enough of the sexism in Pakistan. Malala Yousafzai has definitely become a role model for girls in her homeland and she has advanced girl's education by a large margin during her fight. The school systems in Pakistan are lacking because of the environments and the materials teachers focus on and Pakistani boys get a very different education in their religious schools but the girls have begun to work harder to equal up to them and make it to universities.  There are still many restrictions on the jobs women can take but girls are beginning to fight that too.  Pakistan has now had female political officials which has shown the generations of schoolgirls that they can truly do anything they set their minds too and Malala has helped prove that the movement can't be stopped by surviving her assassination attempt and continuing to campaign. 

Daishon Redden's curator insight, April 22, 10:00 AM

I chose this article because it talks about limit of freedom in LDC's and how girls are not allowed to get an education. This was the main idea of what Half The Sky was. Girls no being given the same rights as boy.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 1:40 PM

Starting this article response off with a quote seems only appropriate. This article follows Malala Yousafzai through her horrific experience being victimized by the Talaiban. She is an inspiring girl with all the set backs she has had to endure and she wants the right for an education for Women in her country and society. She is determined in order to create a better life for herself and her people. “The peasants had a very difficult situation, but they didn’t give up,” Aroosa says in English. “They fought back, and got power. Girls can fight back and can get an education. A girl can bring a big change.”

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Pakistan Council for Science & Technology

Pakistan Council for Science & Technology | Women and Education in the Middle East | Scoop.it
National Science, Technology and inovative Policy 2012
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Malala Is Back: The Challenges Ahead for Girls' Education in Pakistan

Malala Is Back: The Challenges Ahead for Girls' Education in Pakistan | Women and Education in the Middle East | Scoop.it
The teenage activist, who survived a Taliban assassination attempt, is now out of the hospital -- and ready to continue the work that nearly got her killed.
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The State of Women in the World

The State of Women in the World | Women and Education in the Middle East | Scoop.it

Tags: gender, development, worldwide, poverty.


Via Seth Dixon
Shelby Porter's insight:

Why are women so unequal to men? Why are women in the Middle East seeing such bad treatment and unequality? How can we fix these problems?

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Kalin B.'s comment, November 5, 2012 11:34 AM
Infographics can be infinitely useful in persuasively conveying important data. I especially appreciate this, considering I make them myself!
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 12, 2013 1:39 PM

Gender Development index - CHapter 9 materials

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:09 AM

This is a great represenaton for showing the unfortunate truth of the state women in the world today.

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Burka Avenger

"Burka Avenger is a new Pakistani kids' show about a mild-mannered teacher who moonlights as a burka-clad superhero."


Via Seth Dixon, Shelby Porter
Shelby Porter's insight:

This short introduction to the television show is comical and seems interesting to many different age groups. It highlights a teacher in a burka helping the children and trying to stop bad people. It shows that gender has nothing to do with the ability to defend and help someone. If this woman can do it in a burka, anyone could. I think it will show a positive message in Pakistan where gender equality isn't fully understood. While many people will treat it as just another crime-fighting television show, hopefully some children will take some positive messages away. 

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 1, 2013 1:49 PM

This TV show is very different from something we would see here in the US. What was interesting was that the superhero in this video was fighting for education. The basis of the show was that the schools were shut down, and a superhero (a teacher) was trying to help the students and fight for education. This is a constant struggle for the people of Pakistan. They don't have education like we do. Their culture is much different than ours. We really take advantage of all the opportunities that we have in education. We don't need to have a "superhero" to save education in the US because we have education easily available to us, whereas the people in Pakistan do not. That is all they want. They want to learn new things and become educated. This TV show represents what the people of Pakistan want and want to fight for. I think ultimatley the show represents the culture they want and are fighting for. 

Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 2, 2013 4:40 PM

My geography class watched this. It is an interesting example of how different cultures can mesh together, such as the Burka Avenger and Wonder Woman. It is really interesting that the Burka Avenger is a school teacher by day, which shows how highly educators are thought of in the society.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 9:27 AM

This is great!  It is a cute animated trailer to the cartoon series the Burka Avenger!  She wears a burka to hide her identity which it certainly does, and then she kicks the bad guy’s butts!  A great gender reversal in this area, showing women can be a hero and stand up to men.  And she cleverly uses the restrictive clothing to keep her identity concealed. 

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Saudi women's new campaign to end driving ban

Saudi women's new campaign to end driving ban | Women and Education in the Middle East | Scoop.it
Saudi Arabia women demanding their government lift a ban that prohibits them from driving are urging the nation's females to drive cars on October 26.

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Shelby Porter's insight:

Just another great example of how much Muslim culture and beliefs play a role in these womens' everyday lives. These women do not have equal rights to men, and many are standing up against this. I hope that in our lifetime, we will see the day Muslim men and women will have equal rights. I think these women are very courageous to go against their government for something they truely want and believe in.

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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, October 3, 2013 10:45 AM

In Saudi aabia women still dont have the right to drive. they should get with the program because around the world women are allowed to do many things. This is one of many countries in the middle east that should give women there rights back. Women should be able to drive because it makes there life much easier and they dont have to wait for a taxi or anything. It is amazing how much culture plays a big part on there society.

Shelby Porter's curator insight, October 7, 2013 9:56 AM

Just another great example of how much Muslim culture and beliefs play a role in these womens' everyday lives. These women do not have equal rights to men, and many are standing up against this. I hope that in our lifetime, we will see the day Muslim men and women will have equal rights. I think these women are very courageous to go against their government for something they truely want and believe in. 

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Who are the Taliban?

Who are the Taliban? | Women and Education in the Middle East | Scoop.it
BBC News looks at the history of the Taliban movement in Afghanistan and Pakistan.
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In historic shift, Saudis to allow some girls' sports

In historic shift, Saudis to allow some girls' sports | Women and Education in the Middle East | Scoop.it

"Private girls' schools are now allowed to hold sports activities in accordance with the rules of Shariah, or Islamic law. Students must adhere to 'decent dress' codes and Saudi women teachers will be given priority in supervising the activities, according to the Education Ministry's requirements.  The decision makes sports once again a stage for the push to improve women's rights, nearly a year after two Saudi female athletes made an unprecedented appearance at the Olympics."  This news comes at a time when Saudi Arabia has allowed women to ride bikes (sort of).

 

Tags: Saudi Arabia, culture, gender, religion, Middle East.


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 2, 9:53 PM

The article displays the constant battle the women of Saudi Arabia face on a daily basis. However, this is a small sign of women in this area slowly getting more rights. This is an important right granted to women. Being allowed to participate in sporting activities or other types of physical exercise is very important in order to maintain a healthy lifestyle. 

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 2:49 PM

This is a push in the struggle for women's rights in Saudi Arabian. For the first time girls will be allowed to play sports in private schools. The ultraconservative kingdom still requires that the girls were descent and  decent dress and and Saudi women teachers are going to have priority in supervising the activities.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 3:23 PM

Female rights in countries like Saudi Arabia are nothing like in the U.S. Much like in other Middle Eastern countries, Saudi Arabia allows little to no extra curricular activities for girls and women. Allowing them to play some specific sports is a huge deal!

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The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan

The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan | Women and Education in the Middle East | Scoop.it
In a country this battered, fractured, dysfunctional – how much can she really hope to achieve?

 

The issue of female education in Pakistan has exploded after Malala Yousafzai was attacked by the Taliban for publicly advocating for girls to receive more schooling.  This attack has lead several media outlets to take a more serious look at the gendered cultural and economic opportunities (or lack thereof) for girls within Pakistan.  This NPR podcast also speaks of the real options in front of so many girls like Malala and the cultural and political contexts within which they navigate their lives.

 

Tags: gender, South Asia, podcast, culture, Islam, development, unit 3 culture, education.


Via Seth Dixon
Shelby Porter's insight:

How much can one girl really do in trying to gain education for women in Pakistan? Well for starters, she has brought them hope. Hope for a better future, and hope for education in the future. She has started a revolution for her people and is not afraid to stand for what she believes should be allowed in her country. Knowledge is power, and she is fighting for every woman to gain knowledge and become a powerful member of their society. 

more...
Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:09 PM

I really love this article because the young girl being interviewed is angry and has had enough of the sexism in Pakistan. Malala Yousafzai has definitely become a role model for girls in her homeland and she has advanced girl's education by a large margin during her fight. The school systems in Pakistan are lacking because of the environments and the materials teachers focus on and Pakistani boys get a very different education in their religious schools but the girls have begun to work harder to equal up to them and make it to universities.  There are still many restrictions on the jobs women can take but girls are beginning to fight that too.  Pakistan has now had female political officials which has shown the generations of schoolgirls that they can truly do anything they set their minds too and Malala has helped prove that the movement can't be stopped by surviving her assassination attempt and continuing to campaign. 

Daishon Redden's curator insight, April 22, 10:00 AM

I chose this article because it talks about limit of freedom in LDC's and how girls are not allowed to get an education. This was the main idea of what Half The Sky was. Girls no being given the same rights as boy.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 1:40 PM

Starting this article response off with a quote seems only appropriate. This article follows Malala Yousafzai through her horrific experience being victimized by the Talaiban. She is an inspiring girl with all the set backs she has had to endure and she wants the right for an education for Women in her country and society. She is determined in order to create a better life for herself and her people. “The peasants had a very difficult situation, but they didn’t give up,” Aroosa says in English. “They fought back, and got power. Girls can fight back and can get an education. A girl can bring a big change.”

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Cultural Perspectives

Cultural Perspectives | Women and Education in the Middle East | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon, Shelby Porter
Shelby Porter's insight:

This political cartoon is just another great example of how different cultures are across the globe. Here in America, we are told that the appropriate swimwear to wear to the beach only covers about a third of our body. Where as in the Middle East, wearing a burka is what they are told is the right type of clothing to wear. Whether it be for religious, cultural, or fashionable reasons, women wear all types of clothing and I don't believe it is directly due to male influence. There are many things that could cause this influence such as the church, family, or the media. Yet as the cartoon says, each woman thinks the men in that country are forcing them into wearing clothes like that and their culture is dominated by men. I guess it just shows the different perspectives each culture can have. 

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 6:52 PM

This cartoon reminds me of what a fascinating time we live in with the internet and streaming videos.  Just a few hundred years ago people thought dragons walked down the streets in china, now there are a handful of documentaries on the Chinese new year.  Wars have been fought using propaganda of us vs. them but now I could skype with a kid in Syria right now and find out what he thinks and has seen.  I hope as all of the world cultures acclimate to each other we adopt a live and let live mentality. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:51 AM
This cartoon depicts the cultural differences between two different cultures. On the right you have a woman in a traditional burka that covers all but her eyes. On the left you have a woman in a bikini which is what is apropriate to wear on the beach or to bed. Two totally different societies and beliefs and they both look at one another and see the other person as inapropriate. This is not the first time another country has looked at the USA and turned their nose up to something that we do differently.
Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 16, 2013 6:31 PM

when I look at this the first thought that comes to mind is it is easy for other people to judge. just by there comments they have no idea what the others beliefs are,. This is a classic judging a book by it's cover. The are both assuming it has to do with a male dominating world. I think it has to do with what you are comfortable with. 

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The Daily Show: Extended Interview: Malala Yousafzai

In this exclusive, unedited interview, "I Am Malala" author Malala Yousafzai remembers the Taliban's rise to power in her Pakistani hometown and discusses he...
Shelby Porter's insight:

This courageous young woman is speaking out about how women are not allowed to be educated in her Pakistani hometown. A group of terrorists called the Talaban have been terrorizing her town for a very long time, and have even shot her in the face. But this has not stopped her. She is not afraid, and knows she must get her message to as many people as possible. She feels the greatest power of all is education and knowledge, and that is why the Talaban do not want these people to recieve an education, because then they could be defeated. This young girl is truely ispirational and it is no surprise she has been nominated for a nobel peace prize. Like many other women in her country, all she wants is the right to get an education and she isn't concerenced with the lengths she will have to go to get it. 

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