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The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan

The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan | Women and Education in the Middle East | Scoop.it
In a country this battered, fractured, dysfunctional – how much can she really hope to achieve?

 

The issue of female education in Pakistan has exploded after Malala Yousafzai was attacked by the Taliban for publicly advocating for girls to receive more schooling.  This attack has lead several media outlets to take a more serious look at the gendered cultural and economic opportunities (or lack thereof) for girls within Pakistan.  This NPR podcast also speaks of the real options in front of so many girls like Malala and the cultural and political contexts within which they navigate their lives.

 

Tags: gender, South Asia, podcast, culture, Islam, development, unit 3 culture, education.


Via Seth Dixon
Shelby Porter's insight:

How much can one girl really do in trying to gain education for women in Pakistan? Well for starters, she has brought them hope. Hope for a better future, and hope for education in the future. She has started a revolution for her people and is not afraid to stand for what she believes should be allowed in her country. Knowledge is power, and she is fighting for every woman to gain knowledge and become a powerful member of their society. 

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Daishon Redden's curator insight, April 22, 2014 10:00 AM

I chose this article because it talks about limit of freedom in LDC's and how girls are not allowed to get an education. This was the main idea of what Half The Sky was. Girls no being given the same rights as boy.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 1:40 PM

Starting this article response off with a quote seems only appropriate. This article follows Malala Yousafzai through her horrific experience being victimized by the Talaiban. She is an inspiring girl with all the set backs she has had to endure and she wants the right for an education for Women in her country and society. She is determined in order to create a better life for herself and her people. “The peasants had a very difficult situation, but they didn’t give up,” Aroosa says in English. “They fought back, and got power. Girls can fight back and can get an education. A girl can bring a big change.”

Kendra King's curator insight, March 28, 8:45 PM

It would make sense for the immediate well-being of the girls for the family to just leave Pakistan. As the article mentioned, the economy is horrible for graduates (especially women) and the country lives in a dangerous military state. Yet, the family (excluding the father) continues to stay in Pakistan. I wonder, since their father is a doctor and can afford private schooling, if they stay because of the wealth advantage. As the author alluded to, girls can be more than teachers if they have the resources like Prime Minster Buhtto did. Still though, with the danger so high and better jobs available I really think there is more to the story. The explanation that makes most sense to me came from Mahrukh’s statement regarding Prime Minster Buhtto when she said, “Everyone has to go from this world, why not be famous? Why not make a name and leave your name on people’s lips.” This quote shows just how dedicated Mahrukh is to her country. It is so high that she is willing to die doing something important (provided it makes her famous).  In some ways, I find that misguided. I think the attention girls like her and Malala can bring to people who are donating to the politically broken school is of immense value. This attention wakes more people up to the issues of Pakistan and the issues of the Taliban to one day put more pressure on the nation. Yet, I know Malala doesn’t want to continue to raise awareness among the Western world her whole life. Her autobiography ends with her dreaming of returning to Pakistan. Like Mahrukh, she will die for her country too (308-311). A part deep down can see though, that for a revolution to happen the girls need to actually stay within the country. For one, the west can only interfere with the politics of another country for so long. Furthermore, I am still a legitimate believe in sovereignty despite the increasing globalization. By this I mean that it is the countries issue and it is through the pressure and convictions of the people against the government and the Taliban that will have the most impact. I hope that by staying these girls will one day have an immense impact on the social culture in Pakistan. 

 

*Yousafzai, Malala, and Christina Lamb. I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban. First ed. New York: Little, Brown, 2013. 308-311. Print.

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Pakistan Council for Science & Technology

Pakistan Council for Science & Technology | Women and Education in the Middle East | Scoop.it
National Science, Technology and inovative Policy 2012
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Malala Is Back: The Challenges Ahead for Girls' Education in Pakistan

Malala Is Back: The Challenges Ahead for Girls' Education in Pakistan | Women and Education in the Middle East | Scoop.it
The teenage activist, who survived a Taliban assassination attempt, is now out of the hospital -- and ready to continue the work that nearly got her killed.
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Cyrena & Chloe's curator insight, November 4, 2014 5:30 PM

Intellectual/Arts: Malala, a girl who was shot in the head by the Taliban for standing up for girl's schooling rights, is making a recovery. Even after her near-death experience, she still stands firm on equal schooling rights for girls and women. She wishes for every child to be educated, and serves as inspiration for many. The world is appalled and inspired, but it will take more than her acts to change the school laws.

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The State of Women in the World

The State of Women in the World | Women and Education in the Middle East | Scoop.it

Tags: gender, development, worldwide, poverty.


Via Seth Dixon
Shelby Porter's insight:

Why are women so unequal to men? Why are women in the Middle East seeing such bad treatment and unequality? How can we fix these problems?

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Kalin B.'s comment, November 5, 2012 11:34 AM
Infographics can be infinitely useful in persuasively conveying important data. I especially appreciate this, considering I make them myself!
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 12, 2013 1:39 PM

Gender Development index - CHapter 9 materials

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:09 AM

This is a great represenaton for showing the unfortunate truth of the state women in the world today.

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Burka Avenger

"Burka Avenger is a new Pakistani kids' show about a mild-mannered teacher who moonlights as a burka-clad superhero."


Via Seth Dixon, Shelby Porter
Shelby Porter's insight:

This short introduction to the television show is comical and seems interesting to many different age groups. It highlights a teacher in a burka helping the children and trying to stop bad people. It shows that gender has nothing to do with the ability to defend and help someone. If this woman can do it in a burka, anyone could. I think it will show a positive message in Pakistan where gender equality isn't fully understood. While many people will treat it as just another crime-fighting television show, hopefully some children will take some positive messages away. 

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 19, 2014 12:45 PM

There is something to be said about how film and the media can be used as an effective tool to touch on broad cultural ideals. On a related note, I will be attending a conference soon in Boston on social studies education and one of the seminars I will be going to is how to use SciFi movies in the classroom. Ideals like equality, fighting oppression and free speech are timeless and span many cultures, in Pakistan, the Burka Avenger is that area's media outlet to discuss key social topics to young people.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, April 6, 4:25 PM

A modern day Batman/Superman, Burka Avenger, with great graphics and an in-depth plot. The television shows the Pakistanis children watch are the same type of shows that I watched growing up, and the shows that the modern day children of today’s youth are watching. The cross-cultural relationship seems so different, but at the roots it is the same. The kids in this show have friends, pets, enemies, a hero, a conflict; everything that an American television show would feature.  Whether the kids are facing a bully, a school closure from a villain, or a life peril from another villain, there undercover school teacher is there ready and willing to save the day. Everybody needs a hero to look up to, so this show is great for the Pakistani youth. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 6, 10:06 AM

I think this is wonderful.  It also reemphasizes the reality that all children are born without preconceived notions of what is right, what is wrong, what is good, or what is evil.  An American child might look at this and automatically think that the lady in the Burka is a "villain", due to American media and propaganda.  I can't help but think of the backlash that would surround this cartoon if they ever tried to put it on American airwaves.  

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Saudi women's new campaign to end driving ban

Saudi women's new campaign to end driving ban | Women and Education in the Middle East | Scoop.it
Saudi Arabia women demanding their government lift a ban that prohibits them from driving are urging the nation's females to drive cars on October 26.

Via Kenny Dominguez, Shelby Porter
Shelby Porter's insight:

Just another great example of how much Muslim culture and beliefs play a role in these womens' everyday lives. These women do not have equal rights to men, and many are standing up against this. I hope that in our lifetime, we will see the day Muslim men and women will have equal rights. I think these women are very courageous to go against their government for something they truely want and believe in.

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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, October 3, 2013 10:45 AM

In Saudi aabia women still dont have the right to drive. they should get with the program because around the world women are allowed to do many things. This is one of many countries in the middle east that should give women there rights back. Women should be able to drive because it makes there life much easier and they dont have to wait for a taxi or anything. It is amazing how much culture plays a big part on there society.

Shelby Porter's curator insight, October 7, 2013 9:56 AM

Just another great example of how much Muslim culture and beliefs play a role in these womens' everyday lives. These women do not have equal rights to men, and many are standing up against this. I hope that in our lifetime, we will see the day Muslim men and women will have equal rights. I think these women are very courageous to go against their government for something they truely want and believe in. 

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In historic shift, Saudis to allow some girls' sports

In historic shift, Saudis to allow some girls' sports | Women and Education in the Middle East | Scoop.it

"Private girls' schools are now allowed to hold sports activities in accordance with the rules of Shariah, or Islamic law. Students must adhere to 'decent dress' codes and Saudi women teachers will be given priority in supervising the activities, according to the Education Ministry's requirements.  The decision makes sports once again a stage for the push to improve women's rights, nearly a year after two Saudi female athletes made an unprecedented appearance at the Olympics."  This news comes at a time when Saudi Arabia has allowed women to ride bikes (sort of).

 

Tags: Saudi Arabia, culture, gender, religion, Middle East.


Via Seth Dixon, Shelby Porter
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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 9, 2014 9:37 PM

Women in Saudi Arabia are usually restricted to life in the house and cannot be unaccompanied in public, but allowing Saudi women to play sports is a leap into the future of women's rights in the Middle Eastern country. The women shown in the picture above are seen in traditional dress while training, showing the governments enforcement of rules in this historic move into the future.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, March 22, 4:24 PM

I was happy to see an article like this. It's about time that these women are being given equal opportunities. Although they have a long way to go this is a step in the right direction. Saudi Arabian girls are being allowed to have sport related activities within their private schools. This did surprise me a little just because Saudi women's rights are very limited but this is a simple improvement just to the general health and well being of these girls. Two females competed in the last years summer Olympics representing Saudi Arabia and their efforts were not shown on Saudi TV. These women competing has opened a few doors to allowing more than just men to engage in these activities. Usually sports were only for the elite women who could afford gym memberships or attend well known colleges. Even though women cannot compete internationally or sign up for clubs or leagues this is a step in the right direction.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 4:47 PM

This is an interesting article about slowly allowing women in Saudi Arabia to participate in sports. While playing soccer or swimming or running may not seem so important to us in the West, it is a big deal for Saudi women. Saudi Arabia has some of the strictest laws in the Middle East regarding women's rights, and so even a very partial and gradual allowance for women to engage in sports is a big step. It shows perhaps a slight softening of adherence to Shariah law, which would hopefully eventually allow women more freedom in the realms of education and work, as well as in everyday life. 

 

Too often are people quick to judge and characterize other cultures or religions by the most extreme examples. While it is true that laws in Saudi Arabia are extremely restrictive to women, progress such as this, though small, may well act as a stepping stone for increased freedoms for women. People outside of Saudi Arabia and Islamic culture must realize that this kind of progress does happen and is, in fact, happening right now. To simply dismiss Saudi culture as misogynistic and oppressive is to write the whole culture off. While progress is slow and less than ideal, we should look to Saudi Arabia's Islamic neighbors and see that many of them are not so oppressive to women. Allowing Saudi women to participate in sports, therefore, may be setting up the country to increase women's rights and join its relatively more liberal neighbors. This is certainly a sign of positive change, and one that should not be ignored. 

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The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan

The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan | Women and Education in the Middle East | Scoop.it
In a country this battered, fractured, dysfunctional – how much can she really hope to achieve?

 

The issue of female education in Pakistan has exploded after Malala Yousafzai was attacked by the Taliban for publicly advocating for girls to receive more schooling.  This attack has lead several media outlets to take a more serious look at the gendered cultural and economic opportunities (or lack thereof) for girls within Pakistan.  This NPR podcast also speaks of the real options in front of so many girls like Malala and the cultural and political contexts within which they navigate their lives.

 

Tags: gender, South Asia, podcast, culture, Islam, development, unit 3 culture, education.


Via Seth Dixon
Shelby Porter's insight:

How much can one girl really do in trying to gain education for women in Pakistan? Well for starters, she has brought them hope. Hope for a better future, and hope for education in the future. She has started a revolution for her people and is not afraid to stand for what she believes should be allowed in her country. Knowledge is power, and she is fighting for every woman to gain knowledge and become a powerful member of their society. 

more...
Daishon Redden's curator insight, April 22, 2014 10:00 AM

I chose this article because it talks about limit of freedom in LDC's and how girls are not allowed to get an education. This was the main idea of what Half The Sky was. Girls no being given the same rights as boy.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 1:40 PM

Starting this article response off with a quote seems only appropriate. This article follows Malala Yousafzai through her horrific experience being victimized by the Talaiban. She is an inspiring girl with all the set backs she has had to endure and she wants the right for an education for Women in her country and society. She is determined in order to create a better life for herself and her people. “The peasants had a very difficult situation, but they didn’t give up,” Aroosa says in English. “They fought back, and got power. Girls can fight back and can get an education. A girl can bring a big change.”

Kendra King's curator insight, March 28, 8:45 PM

It would make sense for the immediate well-being of the girls for the family to just leave Pakistan. As the article mentioned, the economy is horrible for graduates (especially women) and the country lives in a dangerous military state. Yet, the family (excluding the father) continues to stay in Pakistan. I wonder, since their father is a doctor and can afford private schooling, if they stay because of the wealth advantage. As the author alluded to, girls can be more than teachers if they have the resources like Prime Minster Buhtto did. Still though, with the danger so high and better jobs available I really think there is more to the story. The explanation that makes most sense to me came from Mahrukh’s statement regarding Prime Minster Buhtto when she said, “Everyone has to go from this world, why not be famous? Why not make a name and leave your name on people’s lips.” This quote shows just how dedicated Mahrukh is to her country. It is so high that she is willing to die doing something important (provided it makes her famous).  In some ways, I find that misguided. I think the attention girls like her and Malala can bring to people who are donating to the politically broken school is of immense value. This attention wakes more people up to the issues of Pakistan and the issues of the Taliban to one day put more pressure on the nation. Yet, I know Malala doesn’t want to continue to raise awareness among the Western world her whole life. Her autobiography ends with her dreaming of returning to Pakistan. Like Mahrukh, she will die for her country too (308-311). A part deep down can see though, that for a revolution to happen the girls need to actually stay within the country. For one, the west can only interfere with the politics of another country for so long. Furthermore, I am still a legitimate believe in sovereignty despite the increasing globalization. By this I mean that it is the countries issue and it is through the pressure and convictions of the people against the government and the Taliban that will have the most impact. I hope that by staying these girls will one day have an immense impact on the social culture in Pakistan. 

 

*Yousafzai, Malala, and Christina Lamb. I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban. First ed. New York: Little, Brown, 2013. 308-311. Print.
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Cultural Perspectives

Cultural Perspectives | Women and Education in the Middle East | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon, Shelby Porter
Shelby Porter's insight:

This political cartoon is just another great example of how different cultures are across the globe. Here in America, we are told that the appropriate swimwear to wear to the beach only covers about a third of our body. Where as in the Middle East, wearing a burka is what they are told is the right type of clothing to wear. Whether it be for religious, cultural, or fashionable reasons, women wear all types of clothing and I don't believe it is directly due to male influence. There are many things that could cause this influence such as the church, family, or the media. Yet as the cartoon says, each woman thinks the men in that country are forcing them into wearing clothes like that and their culture is dominated by men. I guess it just shows the different perspectives each culture can have. 

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 6:52 PM

This cartoon reminds me of what a fascinating time we live in with the internet and streaming videos.  Just a few hundred years ago people thought dragons walked down the streets in china, now there are a handful of documentaries on the Chinese new year.  Wars have been fought using propaganda of us vs. them but now I could skype with a kid in Syria right now and find out what he thinks and has seen.  I hope as all of the world cultures acclimate to each other we adopt a live and let live mentality. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:51 AM
This cartoon depicts the cultural differences between two different cultures. On the right you have a woman in a traditional burka that covers all but her eyes. On the left you have a woman in a bikini which is what is apropriate to wear on the beach or to bed. Two totally different societies and beliefs and they both look at one another and see the other person as inapropriate. This is not the first time another country has looked at the USA and turned their nose up to something that we do differently.
Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 16, 2013 6:31 PM

when I look at this the first thought that comes to mind is it is easy for other people to judge. just by there comments they have no idea what the others beliefs are,. This is a classic judging a book by it's cover. The are both assuming it has to do with a male dominating world. I think it has to do with what you are comfortable with. 

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The Daily Show: Extended Interview: Malala Yousafzai

In this exclusive, unedited interview, "I Am Malala" author Malala Yousafzai remembers the Taliban's rise to power in her Pakistani hometown and discusses he...
Shelby Porter's insight:

This courageous young woman is speaking out about how women are not allowed to be educated in her Pakistani hometown. A group of terrorists called the Talaban have been terrorizing her town for a very long time, and have even shot her in the face. But this has not stopped her. She is not afraid, and knows she must get her message to as many people as possible. She feels the greatest power of all is education and knowledge, and that is why the Talaban do not want these people to recieve an education, because then they could be defeated. This young girl is truely ispirational and it is no surprise she has been nominated for a nobel peace prize. Like many other women in her country, all she wants is the right to get an education and she isn't concerenced with the lengths she will have to go to get it. 

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