Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent.
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Rose Wylie claims UK painting's biggest prize; 80-year-old artist scoops £25,000 first prize

Rose Wylie claims UK painting's biggest prize; 80-year-old artist scoops £25,000 first prize | Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent. | Scoop.it
Rose Wylie was announced the 29th winner of the John Moores Painting Prize at the a href= http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk target= _blank Walker
Judith Robertson's insight:

Painter Rose Wylie has been awarded a 25000BPS prize for a large scale canvas featuring 4 female figures set in linear transit.  The disjointed figures evoke the partialities of memory and representation. The 80-year old artist draws inspiration from the cinema, which she visits 3 times a week.  “I like to sit watching a film and get completely ‘caught’ by a scene, such as the one featuring a garage door in Herzog’s film. I work with the image from memory; I don’t watch it again. I prefer to work back from memory, working with the moment, producing some change, perhaps, but in doing so I try and hitch the image back to the film.  I couldn’t just do an abstract version of it because that would not pay the ‘visual moment’ proper respect. This particular image had a cartoon quality, and therefore is light-hearted, the garage door features a lot in the film, with its ‘colouring-book’ look while the plot itself is very black in itself and in its references.”  Wylie believes that art and poetry inform each other. “You can extend from what you do in poetry to understand what you might do as a visual artist. Sometimes only the ‘right’ word will work: it must have the right rhythm and ‘feel’. I might use a colour, but then have to change it many times till I think it’s right – which is probably a parallel process. T.S.Eliot’s point in East Coker about last year’s words needing to change for next year’s language is what artist’s do: you can’t keep doing the same thing.”

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The 7 books Eleanor Catton wants you to read

The 7 books Eleanor Catton wants you to read | Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent. | Scoop.it
Reading played an important role in author Eleanor Catton’s development as a writer. In fact it took her two years
Judith Robertson's insight:

A reading list of five top favourites from Man Booker Prize winner and author of The Luminaries, Eleanor Catton.  I especially love her inclusion of Louis Hyde’s The Gift: Creativity and the Artist in the Modern World, about which Margaret Atwood writes, “The best book I know of for talented but unacknowledged creators.  A Masterpiece."

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New website by the University of York charts mysteries surrounding the enigmatic Aero Girls

New website by the University of York charts mysteries surrounding the enigmatic Aero Girls | Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent. | Scoop.it
A new website launched by the University of York unlocks some of the mysteries surrounding an enigmatic collection of 1950s paintings commissioned by
Judith Robertson's insight:

In this delightful story an art mystery unfolds regarding the identities of 40 beautiful women. Chosen by the Rowntree Family as the subjects of oil paintings in the 1950s, the women's images were widely circulated in magazine and TV advertisements to sell AERO chocolate bars.  The original oil paintings lay forgotten in dusty archives for half a century until two female scholars at the University of York recently discovered them, and launched a research project to identify the women and their painters.

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Rosa Parks' archive heads to Library of Congress

Rosa Parks' archive heads to Library of Congress | Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent. | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hundreds of items from civil rights icon Rosa Parks that were long kept hidden away in a New York warehouse will have a new home (RT @abronxchick: Rosa Parks' archive heads to Library of Congress


Via Jules Rochielle
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The Stories by Jane Gardam, review - Telegraph

The Stories by Jane Gardam, review - Telegraph | Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent. | Scoop.it
Jane Gardam excels at writing about the human heart argues Diana Athill
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"Gardam could indeed write well about linoleum if she wanted to, but what she excels at is writing about the human heart and mind."

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Doris Pilkington Garimara, Aboriginal Novelist, Dies at 76

Doris Pilkington Garimara, Aboriginal Novelist, Dies at 76 | Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent. | Scoop.it
Ms. Garimara was best known for her 1996 novel “Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence,” which helped awaken Australians to the plight of the Aborigines and was later made into a film.
Judith Robertson's insight:

A literary and life warrior is laid to rest. "When she was 45, Ms. Pilkington Garimara returned to her mother’s village to research a possible book. For years, she came back for periods of six to eight weeks. She relearned her original language. Her mother showed her the tree under which she was born. Ms. Pilkington Garimara extensively interviewed her Aunt Daisy, who had accompanied her mother on her 1,000-mile journey."

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Female Filmmaker Friday: Orlando, 1992 (dir. Sally Potter)

Female Filmmaker Friday: Orlando, 1992 (dir. Sally Potter) | Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent. | Scoop.it
We're entering the third month of the Female Filmmaker Friday feature. I hope I have introduced y'all to some great cinema and hope to keep doing for a long time! The more I read about the abysmal ...
Judith Robertson's insight:

"Each being is a world in and of himself/herself," writes Mahmoud Dowlatabadi.  It's an idea that easily encompasses the creative genius of film director Sally Potter, author Virginia Woolf, and literary biography/fantasy Orlando, that incredible worldly work that brings these great women artists together.


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The Network of Pipes Under Manhattan’s Streets

The Network of Pipes Under Manhattan’s Streets | Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent. | Scoop.it
The web of conduits, cables and pipes under the street at Hudson and Leonard Streets is a typical snapshot of the city’s subterranean complexity.
Judith Robertson's insight:

Subterranean complexity.... what is hidden to the human eye and yet sustains us.

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Video: Tilda Swinton at SXSW

Video: Tilda Swinton at SXSW | Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent. | Scoop.it
The actress discusses her role as a vampire in “Only Lovers Left Alive.”
Judith Robertson's insight:

Tilda Swinton talks about playing the role of a vampire, and how it was very enticing to her psychologically to enact an everlasting being who doesn't have to think about the cul-de-sac (mortality) that always arrives too soon.

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Donna Tartt and Eleanor Catton Among Nominees for Women's Fiction Prize

Donna Tartt and Eleanor Catton Among Nominees for Women's Fiction Prize | Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent. | Scoop.it
The Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction was known as the Orange Prize until last year.
Judith Robertson's insight:

Good to see Donna Tartt on the list, but WONDERFUL to see my country-woman, Margaret Atwood, acknowledge.

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India Art n Design inditerrain: Rekha Rodwittiya’s Matters of the Heart

India Art n Design inditerrain: Rekha Rodwittiya’s Matters of the Heart | Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent. | Scoop.it
Renowned Indian artist Rekha Rodwittiya’s latest exhibition at the Sakshi Gallery in Mumbai, aptly reflects her long-time muse – feminist articulation – in a compendium titled ‘Matters of the Heart’.
Judith Robertson's insight:

Gorgeous and vibrant images of female wholeness, layered and culturally/artistically/historically cross referential in thoughtful ways - I love this exhibition by Rekha Rodwittiya, currently showing in Mumbai.

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Where Dance and Textiles Meet

Where Dance and Textiles Meet | Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent. | Scoop.it
A new book by the New York photographer Briana Blasko, ‘Dance of the Weave,’ captures Indian dancers’ interaction with fabric through movement.
Judith Robertson's insight:

When Briana Blasko apprenticed with Annie Leibowitz a few years, her heart connected with the photographer journalist's shots of dancers.  Motivated by her muse as well as her experiences at a Yoga retreat in India, Blasko has published a book that celebrates the interconnections between the body and textiles.

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The Read Around: Video of Elizabeth Gilbert

The Read Around: Video of Elizabeth Gilbert | Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent. | Scoop.it
In her return to fiction writing with “The Signature of All Things,” the author Elizabeth Gilbert found that the process can be familiar yet liberating from the constraints of nonfiction.
Judith Robertson's insight:

This short video clip of Elizabeth Gilbert finds her addressing the joys of writing fiction.  Her exuberance shines through, as does her discipline and fierce devotion to productive daily writing protocols.  BTW, if you haven't read the book, go out and buy it or download it.  Now.  It's a brilliant and joyful read, and I'm pretty sure you'll fall in love with the heroine.  I did.

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Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf was one of the most important and celebrated writers of the twentieth century. This extensive exhibition of portraits and rare archival material will explore her life and achievements as a novelist, intellectual, campaigner and public figure.
Judith Robertson's insight:

This enlivening and rare archival collection from Ottoline Morrell's private scrapbooks at Garsington features Virginia Woolf in the company of her beloved Bloomsbury's during the mid to late '20s.  Gorgeous shots conveying the deep integrity of friendship during the years that gave birth to Woolf's most famous creations.

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Kenojuak Ashevak gets posthumous birthday Google doodle

Kenojuak Ashevak gets posthumous birthday Google doodle | Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent. | Scoop.it
Google's doodle pays tribute to Kenojuak Ashevak. The late Inuk artist, best known for her Enchanted Owl, would have turned 87 on Friday.
Judith Robertson's insight:

The enchanting and iconic work of the late Kenojuak Ashevak, a Canadian Inuit artist from Cape Dorset in Nunavut gets honoured today by Google Doodle.  The gifted artist died in 2013 from Cancer.

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Radical Feminist Archives

Radical Feminist Archives | Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent. | Scoop.it
Judith Robertson's insight:

A fabulous collection of classic radical feminist voices and works, many available for free PDF download.

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Violette: ‘Anything unattainable, she wanted’

Violette: ‘Anything unattainable, she wanted’ | Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent. | Scoop.it
Unlike Genet, whose erotically charged work unfolds in prison cells and public toilets, Leduc’s sexual frankness was greeted with the same reflexive French literary chauvinism that accompanied De Beauvoir’s The Second Sex in 1949. Her early works were bowdlerised and censored, and it was not until the publication of her memoir, La Bâtarde, in 1964, that she made a penny from her work. As De Beauvoir said of her that year: “I know of no finer salvation through literature.”
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Judith Robertson's curator insight, September 30, 2014 9:19 AM

Hungry for a new film about a writer's life, having never quite recovered from Jane Campion's Angel at My Table?  A new biopic ushers us into the fragile and contingent reality of Violette Leduc, "a key figure in the postwar Left Bank literary and philosophical intelligentsia, who consorted with Sartre, Cocteau, Camus, Jean Genet and Simone de Beauvoir (with whom she had a debilitating and unrequited romantic obsession)."

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Reading Landai in New York

Reading Landai in New York | Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent. | Scoop.it
Eliza Griswold will read from “I Am The Beggar of the World,” a book of landai by female Afghan poets, in New York on May 12, 2014. Griswold wrote for the magazine about young Afghan women for whom writing landai served as a vital, and in some cases sole, link to a wider world.
Judith Robertson's insight:

What an amazing form of resistance - and how wonderful that Griswold's reading brings these poems to the world.

 

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Meryl Streep to Star as a Rocker for TriStar

Meryl Streep to Star as a Rocker for TriStar | Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent. | Scoop.it
TriStar, a newly revived unit of Sony, will produce “Ricki and the Flash,” directed by Jonathan Demme, with Ms. Streep as a guitar-wielding grocery clerk.
Judith Robertson's insight:

Meryl Streep does it again...

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The Supreme Court's Women Justices Take On Hobby Lobby

The Supreme Court's Women Justices Take On Hobby Lobby | Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent. | Scoop.it
Does the right to contraceptives trump the right to religious freedom? There was little doubt where the Court’s female Justices stood.
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"Dana Kyndrová: Woman's Destiny" opens at Rosphoto, State Museum and Exhibition Centre

"Dana Kyndrová: Woman's Destiny" opens at Rosphoto, State Museum and Exhibition Centre | Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent. | Scoop.it
The exhibition of works by the Czech photographer Dana Kyndrová Woman's Destiny comprises more than one hundred pictures taken throughout Europe from
Judith Robertson's insight:

I would love to see this exhibit.  The photographer, who is an adherent of black and white photography, believes in its power to provide greater concentration, stylization, and free scope to the imagination.  The artist writes that her love of photography springs from the ways in which it allows her to learn more about places and people.  Her photography brings her joy when it resonates with the public and triggers emotions in people.

I am not a conservative adherent of black-and-white photography, but I believe that the colour should be function-oriented rather than be a colour for colour’s sake. Besides, the black-and-white imagery provides a great advantage for portrait photography, as it helps to concentrate on the subject. Moreover, being a sort of a stylization of life, it gives free scope to one’s imagination. I am not so naive as to deem that photography can change the world around us, fraught with controversy. Photography for me is what I am interested in, my source of joy, the opportunity to learn more about the places and people that I might have never seen in other circumstances. And I feel happy when my works resonate with the public and trigger some emotions in p

More Information: http://artdaily.com/news/68694/-Dana-Kyndrov---Woman-s-Destiny--opens-at-Rosphoto--State-Museum-and-Exhibition-Centre#.UyXNQ15w1TU[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.orgI am not a conservative adherent of black-and-white photography, but I believe that the colour should be function-oriented rather than be a colour for colour’s sake. Besides, the black-and-white imagery provides a great advantage for portrait photography, as it helps to concentrate on the subject. Moreover, being a sort of a stylization of life, it gives free scope to one’s imagination. I am not so naive as to deem that photography can change the world around us, fraught with controversy. Photography for me is what I am interested in, my source of joy, the opportunity to learn more about the places and people that I might have never seen in other circumstances. And I feel happy when my works resonate with the public and trigger some emotions in

More Information: http://artdaily.com/news/68694/-Dana-Kyndrov---Woman-s-Destiny--opens-at-Rosphoto--State-Museum-and-Exhibition-Centre#.UyXNQ15w1TU[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.orgI am not a conservative adherent of black-and-white photography, but I believe that the colour should be function-oriented rather than be a colour for colour’s sake. Besides, the black-and-white imagery provides a great advantage for portrait photography, as it helps to concentrate on the subject. Moreover, being a sort of a stylization of life, it gives free scope to one’s imagination. I am not so naive as to deem that photography can change the world around us, fraught with controversy. Photography for me is what I am interested in, my source of joy, the opportunity to learn more about the places and people that I might have never seen in other circumstances. And I feel happy when my works resonate with the public and trigger some emotions in people.

More Information: http://artdaily.com/news/68694/-Dana-Kyndrov---Woman-s-Destiny--opens-at-Rosphoto--State-Museum-and-Exhibition-Centre#.UyXNQ15w1TU[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org
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The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton, review - Telegraph

The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton, review  - Telegraph | Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent. | Scoop.it
Eleanor Catton's Man Booker Prize-winning novel is set in Victorian New Zealand. Lucy Daniel is hooked.
Judith Robertson's insight:

As am I.  "The characters include a reverend, a “whoremonger”, a politician, a prospector, an opium trafficker, a fortune-teller, a jailer. Everyone is from somewhere else (almost – the novel has one Maori character); European prospectors and Chinese labourers remaking themselves in a new world at “the southernmost edge of the civilised earth”. Each knows at least one thing not at first disclosed to the others. Moody becomes privy to the mystery by “a most disjointed and multifarious report”, which the narrator smooths out for the reader’s benefit." Bravo Eleanor Catton!

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‘Crossfire’ Author Gets Eight Figures for a New Series

‘Crossfire’ Author Gets Eight Figures for a New Series | Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent. | Scoop.it
Sylvia Day, the author of the “Crossfire” series of romance novels, will receive a substantial sum from St. Martin’s Press for her next two books.
Judith Robertson's insight:

Kudos to Sylvia Day for scooping an 8 figure sum as instalment on her next two books, which occupy a "crossover" space between romance and erotica.  The "Blackfire" Series is being targeted for lifting the romance industry out of the doldrums after E. L. James's Grey Trilogy.

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Judith Butler casse les idées reçues autour des études de genre

Judith Butler casse les idées reçues autour des études de genre | Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent. | Scoop.it
L'auteure de «Trouble dans le genre» a répondu aux questions du Nouvel Obs et déconstruit les accusations des opposant.e.s à l'égalité des droits.

Via Agnès Poirier K
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A Mighty Honor for Munro, a Humble Writer

A Mighty Honor for Munro, a Humble Writer | Women and Art: Contextualizing women's individual artistic output within the crossings of international history, social belonging, and political intent. | Scoop.it
Alice Munro, who won the Noble Prize in Literature on Thursday, said she was retiring from writing fiction earlier this year.
Judith Robertson's insight:

Can't get enough of this tender marvelous soul.

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