Haley: A Midsummer Night's Dream
193 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Haley Raymond
Scoop.it!

Literary Criticism: The Comedy of the Lovers in A Midsummer Night's Drea

Literary Criticism: The Comedy of the Lovers in A Midsummer Night's Drea | Haley: A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Works Cited

Comtois, M. E. "The Comedy Of The Lovers In A Midsummer Night's Dream." Essays In Literature 12.1 (1985): 15-25. Literary Reference Center. Web. 3 Apr. 2013.

Haley Raymond's insight:

The repetition of love patterns in a Midsummer Night's Dream, being controlled by a higher power, supports the author's argument that the four lovers were not actually the primary characters, but rather as a contributing factor in humorus scences that Shakespeare has used to create a comedy. Shakespeare doesn't focus on the characters backgrounds or personalities, instead using them for a certain brief moment to show humor in a situation they can't control. In the play, the faries used potions and spells to mess with the four lovers lives. Shakespeare uses fairies to manipulate and control the human world in a comical way.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Haley Raymond
Scoop.it!

Video: BBC Shakespeare Animated Tales: A Midsummer Night's Dream - Part 1

Haley Raymond's insight:

This animation is from the BBC animated show Shakespeare Animated Tales. While this video is not too new, it shows that A Midsummer Night's Dream is a timeless play. It has been put into many adaptations, and in this one, a cartoon that makes it easier for children to understand. How many plays that you know have been put into cartoon form?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Haley Raymond
Scoop.it!

Historical Article: The Real Shakespeare

Historical Article: The Real Shakespeare | Haley: A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Works Cited

Rosenblum, Joseph. "The Real Shakespeare." Magill’S Literary Annual 1996 (1996): 1-3. Literary Reference Center. Web. 27 Mar. 2013.

Haley Raymond's insight:

William Shakespeare's life is a mystery, some people believe him not to exist, and some believe him to have had an affair with Queen Elizabeth. Whatever the case is, most of his life is unknown. Even the actual date of his birth is uncertain, saying the date as April 23, 1564 because of the Stratford-on-Avon parish register notes only the baptism of “Gulielmus filius Johannis Shakespeare” on said date. His life is shrouded in uncertanty, where facts only become sharper in 1592. But what was it that happened in the years between 1564 and 1592, a time often refered to as "The Lost Years". One can only ponder...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Haley Raymond
Scoop.it!

Image: The Quarrel of Oberon and Titania

Image: The Quarrel of Oberon and Titania | Haley: A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Haley Raymond's insight:

This painting is by Sir Joseph Noel Paton is called The Quarrel of Oberon and Titania. It is an interpretation of what the scene when Oberon and Titania meet in the woods for the first time in the play would look like. They are fighting over custody of the changeling boy. Both Oberon and Titania look annoyed with one another and the fairies around them are partaking in a variety of carefree activities.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Haley Raymond
Scoop.it!

Source: Much Ado About Notables

Source: Much Ado About Notables | Haley: A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
"Works Cited" Richmond, Hugh M. "Much Ado About Notables." Shakespeare Studies 12.(1979): 49. Literary Reference Center. Web. 27 Mar. 2013.
Haley Raymond's insight:

It is well known that Shakespeare uses other works to inspire his own. In many of his plays, he will have a homage to one thing or another, ranging from Greek Myths to other Plays. In A Midsummer Night's Dream, there are many examples of this. Duke Theseus, for example, is named after Theseus from the Greek myth Theseus and the Minotaur. Also, Hermia is named after Hermes, who was the messenger of the Greek gods.

more...
No comment yet.