With My Right Brain
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With My Right Brain
Irrationality is predictable. We need to release "rational man" assumption.
Curated by Emre Erdogan
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The Time For Storytelling is Now via @Onboardly

The Time For Storytelling is Now via @Onboardly | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Guest post from author Mark Evans. For startups to stand out amongst a noisy world of content, the focus must be placed on storytelling for engagement.

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Search for topical articles, influencers and conversations

Search for topical articles, influencers and conversations | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Discover fresh relevant content to your interests, save interesting articles, follow influential experts, be the first to share soon-to-be viral content and much more
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How people rationalize fraud - Kelly Richmond Pope

How people rationalize fraud - Kelly Richmond Pope | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
If you ask people whether they think stealing is wrong, most of them would answer yes. And yet, in 2013, organizations all over the world lost an estimated total of $3.7 trillion to fraud. Kelly Richmond Pope explains how the fraud triangle, (developed by criminologist Donald Cressey) can help us understand how seemingly good people can make unethical decisions in their daily lives.
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Game of Thrones Reignites the Greek Tale of Iphigeneia - Greek Reporter

Game of Thrones Reignites the Greek Tale of Iphigeneia - Greek Reporter | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Like the ancient mythology that confounded the Greeks, the latest twist in Game of Thrones has challenged its audience.
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We can restore cognition by manipulating where the body meets the mind

We can restore cognition by manipulating where the body meets the mind | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
By Michal Schwartz, Weizmann Institute of Science; Aleksandra Deczkowska, Weizmann Institute of Science, and Kuti Baruch, Weizmann Institute of Science Whe ...
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Teaching Behavioral Economics

You’re considering teaching behavioral economics to undergraduates? Or, you’ve been told to? Either way, great! In the hope that you and your students will enjoy the experience just as much as I have, here are some tips to get you off to a flying

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About human irrationality and overconfidence / nugget

About human irrationality and overconfidence / nugget | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Common gestureThinking, Fast and Slow Daniel Kahnemanhttp://t.co/yyoa2pI4CJ http://t.co/FPteWalXg6
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The Business of Behavioral Economics — HBS Working Knowledge

The Business of Behavioral Economics — HBS Working Knowledge | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Leslie John and Michael Norton explore how behavioral economics can help people overcome bad habits and change for the better.
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Trolling our confirmation bias: one bite and we're easily sucked in

Trolling our confirmation bias: one bite and we're easily sucked in | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
A recent hoax study suggesting chocolate helps people lose weight highlights many problems with the way science is conducted and reported by the media.

Via Gerald Carey, Jocelyn Stoller
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Gerald Carey's curator insight, June 7, 2015 1:19 AM

How researchers managed to convince many media outlets that chocolate helps you lose weight.  The story is not unusual but we can still learn a lot about our biases by reading about the process and the reaction.

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"ALL is Mind" - The 12 cognitive biases that prevent you from being rational - And how to free yourself from them by Mastering your Mind; Self Mastery

"ALL is Mind" - The 12 cognitive biases that prevent you from being rational - And how to free yourself from them by Mastering your Mind; Self Mastery | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Before we start, it's important to distinguish between cognitive biases and logical fallacies. A logical fallacy is an error in logical argumentation (e.g. ad hominem attacks, slippery slopes, circular arguments, appeal to force, etc.).

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David Kreps: Choice, Dynamic Choice, and Behavioral Economics

Economist David Kreps argues that traditional economic models of “rational decision making” fail to capture the complexity of how real people make important ...
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How porn can hinder your financial decision-making - Moneyweb.co.za

How porn can hinder your financial decision-making - Moneyweb.co.za | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Moneyweb.co.zaHow porn can hinder your financial decision-makingMoneyweb.co.zaStuart-profile Regulators around the world are worried about new innovations at the intersection of psychology and financial services.
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Diets Are a Lot Like Religion - Yahoo Health

Diets Are a Lot Like Religion - Yahoo Health | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“Two thousand years ago, there were these Daoist monks who decided that if you avoided these five grains — and these were the staple crops of China, what the everyday person subsisted on — you’d live forever, you wouldn’t get any diseases,”...
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Emotional brains 'physically different' to rational ones

Emotional brains 'physically different' to rational ones | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
The work, led by Robert Eres from the University's School of Psychological Sciences, pinpointed correlations between grey matter density and cognitive and affective empathy.


The study looked at whether people who have more brain cells in certain areas of the brain are better at different types of empathy.


"People who are high on affective empathy are often those who get quite fearful when watching a scary movie, or start crying during a sad scene. Those who have high cognitive empathy are those who are more rational, for example a clinical psychologist counselling a client,"  


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The effect of incentives on the evolution of cooperation

The effect of incentives on the evolution of cooperation | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Social dilemmas, in which an individual profits from selfishness, unless the whole group chooses the selfish option, have long provided an academic challen ...
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Nudge theory and cashew nuts

Nudge theory and cashew nuts | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Thx!“@ViviFriedgut: v enjoyed @R_Thaler "Nudge and cashew nuts" [podcast] http://t.co/cctY9m3Vel w @rohan__silva via @IndexVentures @cape”
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Metaphors help us read other people's minds

Metaphors help us read other people's minds | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
MARCH 12, 2015 0 130
Friends use metaphors more often when speaking to one another, and this helps them gauge each other’s emotional state, according to a study published in the journal  Memory & Cognition. The Canadian researchers who performed the study conclude that metaphors facilitate social interactions, comprehension and empathy.



Metaphors are generally used to describe an unfamiliar territory in familiar terms, using words whose sense should not be taken literally. “His head was spinning with idea”, “her home was a prison”. Cognitively speaking, metaphors strain mental resources, but Andrea Bowes and Albert Katz of the University of Ontario in Canada found that not only are these understood with relative easy and commonly used, but might be essential to solid human relationships.

The Theory of Mind describes one’s ability to infer another people’s state of mind, beliefs, knowledge, intents or desires. Some people are better at this than other, and some have a Theory of Mind impaired, like autistic individuals. Essentially, those who have a firm grasp upon the Theory of Mind can predict other people’s behavior. They can read their minds – if I’m also allowed to use a metaphor. Speaking of which, the researchers found in two experiments that those people who had been exposed to metaphors scored better at Theory of Mind tests, liked the  Reading the Mind in the Eye Test (RMET). In this famous test, people have to identify the true emotional state of people displayed in black and white photographs of 36 pairs of eyes.

The eyes are often called the window to the soul. Our eyes widen in fear, boosting sensitivity and expanding our field of vision to locate surrounding danger. When repulsed, our eyes narrow, blocking light to sharpen focus and pinpoint the source of our disgust. And so on for other emotions. There’s so much you can tell just by looking a person in the eyes.

In the first experiment, 39 volunteers attentively read either metaphorical or literal sentences as part of a story. They were then given a surprise Theory of Mind task. The participants who read the metaphorical sentences were significantly better at identifying the correct emotions in the sets of pictures they were presented with in the Reading the Mind in the Eye Test.





The second experiment played back a couple of short stories and participants had to rate the speakers on a variety of interpersonal and social characteristics. The speakers who used metaphors in their conversations where  judged to be closer friends than those who did not use this figure of speech.

“The research explains why we speak differently with friends and family than with strangers, and shows how we make friends and meet partners simply with the style of language we use,” says Bowes. “It provides novel evidence that metaphor plays a special role in orientating one to the mental state of others.”
Not surprisingly, this is where books comes in. Books not only help shape the vocabulary, but also expose the reader to numerous metaphors. After all, there’s no other way – for an author, metaphors are his bread and butter.

“Our findings, along with some others, also stress the importance of literature in fostering and understanding human empathy,” adds Katz. “Reading fiction in general, and metaphors specifically,  indeed promotes people’s ability to identify the emotions or mental state of others.”
Reference: Bowes, A. & Katz, A. (2015). Metaphor creates intimacy and temporarily enhances Theory of Mind, Memory & Cognition. DOI 10.3758/s13421-015-0508-4

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ToKTutor's curator insight, March 14, 2015 11:00 AM

Title 5: Metaphor & empathy: how language and emotion work together to produce knowledge of others.

John Luo's curator insight, October 10, 2015 2:31 AM

counterclaim: concept of metaphor and empathy --> same conclusions

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Female psychopaths process moral judgements differently than male psychopaths

Female psychopaths process moral judgements differently than male psychopaths | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
In the first neuroimaging study of incarcerated female psychopaths, researchers have shown that female psychopaths may process moral emotions differently t ...
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Finance Has Caught On to Behavioral Economics

Finance Has Caught On to Behavioral Economics | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Finance researchers look for what works, not grand theories.
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7 truths about the mind you missed in psychology class

7 truths about the mind you missed in psychology class | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
The longer you live, the more you realize that the difference between success and magnificent failure lies in how well you understand people. If you’re like many, that fact makes you regret not having studied psychology.
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Why Should Philosophers Care About Neuroscience?

Why Should Philosophers Care About Neuroscience? | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Paul and Patricia Churchland have dedicated their professional lives to the question of whether your conscious experience and your brain are the same thing.

Via Jone Johnson Lewis, Jocelyn Stoller
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Everyday music listening The importance of individual and situational factors fo musical emotions and stress reduction

Music listening primarily evokes positive emotions in listeners. Research has shown that positive emotions may be fundamental for improving both psychological and physical aspects of well-being. Besides from the music itself it is essential to consider individual and situational factors when studying emotional experiences to music. Everyone does not respond in the same way to a piece of music and one individual may respond differently to a piece of music at different times. The main aim with the four papers in this thesis was to explore the effects of everyday music listening on emotions, stress and health. By using the Day Reconstruction Method (DRM), a new approach was taken to study the prevalence of musical emotions in everyday life. In the DRM the previous day is divided into episodes, in terms of activity, experienced emotions, and time of day. The results from study I showed that music occurred in 30 % of the episodes and that positive emotions were more often and more intensively experienced in musical episodes than in non-musical episodes. Music was also related to lower stress levels and higher health scores. The results from study II showed that if music occurred in the episode after a particularly stressful episode, the stress level was lower in both that episode and in the next one compared to if music did not occur. A mediation analysis suggested that the positive emotions induced by the music were mediating the effect of music on stress. The results did also show that liking of the music affected the level of stress. In study III, an experiment group who listened to their selfchosen music on mp3-players when arriving home from work every day for 30 minutes for two weeks’ time was compared to a control group who relaxed without music and with a baseline week when the experiment group relaxed without music. The results showed that although no significant differences were found between the groups, the experiment group showed an increase in intensity of positive emotions and decrease in perceived stress level and cortisol levels over time. No such changes were found within the control group. In study IV, data from study I and III was reanalysed with the purpose of exploring the associations between personality and emotional responses to music. The results showed that the associations between personality and intensity of positive emotions, perceived stress, and use of emotion regulation strategies differed in the two datasets and these inconsistencies indicate that personality is not the main contributor to emotional responses to music. Overall, the results from this thesis indicate that everyday music listening is an easy and effective way of improving well-being and health by its ability to evoke positive emotions and thereby reduce stress. But not just any music will do since the responses to music are influenced by individual and situational factors.


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Exposure to ideologically diverse news and opinion on Facebook

Exposure to news, opinion, and civic information increasingly occurs through social media. How do these online networks influence exposure to perspectives that cut across ideological lines? Using deidentified data, we examined how 10.1 million U.S. Facebook users interact with socially shared news. We directly measured ideological homophily in friend networks and examined the extent to which heterogeneous friends could potentially expose individuals to cross-cutting content. We then quantified the extent to which individuals encounter comparatively more or less diverse content while interacting via Facebook’s algorithmically ranked News Feed and further studied users’ choices to click through to ideologically discordant content. Compared with algorithmic ranking, individuals’ choices played a stronger role in limiting exposure to cross-cutting content.


Exposure to ideologically diverse news and opinion on Facebook
Eytan Bakshy, Solomon Messing, Lada A. Adamic

Science 5 June 2015:
Vol. 348 no. 6239 pp. 1130-1132
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.aaa1160


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BE Framing and Mental Accounting Vlog

This video is about framing and mental accounting. • Tversky, A., & Kahneman, D. (2000). Rational Choice and the Framing of Decisions. In D. Kahneman & A.
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We all lie (And it's contagious!) - CNBC

We all lie (And it's contagious!) - CNBC | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
News flash: We all lie! Behavorial economist Dan Ariely explains why — and how it's contagious.
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