With My Right Brain
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With My Right Brain
Irrationality is predictable. We need to release "rational man" assumption.
Curated by Emre Erdogan
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Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Social Neuroscience Advances
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The Missing Peace: Mindfulness Based Practice • Social Justice Solutions

The Missing Peace: Mindfulness Based Practice • Social Justice Solutions | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“Certainly physics designed the bombs, biology the germ warfare, chemistry the nerve gas and so on, but it will be the unhealthy emotions of individuals that will trigger these horrors.

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Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
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Neuroeconomics, identity theory, and the issue of correlation

Neuroeconomics is an interdisciplinary approach that combines cognitive psychology, economics, and neurobiology in studying how people make decisions. A peculiar feature of this approach is the use of neuroscientific methods for individuating the neural correlates of the cognitive processes involved in decision-making. The rationale motivating this use is that neurobiology can provide physical evidence for theoretical and abstract constructs that define the cognitive processes responsible for the human deliberative capacity. In this contribution, I’ll provide a critical account of the above assumption. I’ll argue that, in order to consider neurobiological data as reliable empirical evidence for decision-making theories, neuroeconomists need to adopt a very strong assumption about the relation of brain activity to mental states: mind–body identity theory. Without such an assumption, we should consider these data only in terms of correlation and thus too loose to be truly informative.
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Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Psychology, Sociology & Neuroscience
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The Social Life of Genes: Shaping Your Molecular Composition

The Social Life of Genes: Shaping Your Molecular Composition | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“ Your social life has the power to shape the molecular composition of your body. (Plan your day accordingly.)”
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Did The Good Samaritan Have A Special Genotype? | IdeaFeed | Big Think

Did The Good Samaritan Have A Special Genotype? | IdeaFeed | Big Think | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“New research shows that variations in a particular genotype can make a person more likely to participate in "prosocial" acts, such as rescuing someone from drowning.”
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The Cognitive-Emotional Brain

The Cognitive-Emotional Brain | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“It's out! Finally, The Cognitive-Emotional Brain: From Interactions to Integration, from MIT Press, is out. I remember a few years ago when talking to Olaf Sporns about writing a book and him encou...”
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cognitive-emotional interactions | Emotion & Cognition and the Brain, by Luiz Pessoa

cognitive-emotional interactions | Emotion & Cognition and the Brain, by Luiz Pessoa | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“Posts about cognitive-emotional interactions written by cognitionemotion”
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Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Social Neuroscience Advances
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PLOS Biology: Neural Basis of Solving Problems with Insight

PLOS Biology: Neural Basis of Solving Problems with Insight | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“The sudden flash of insight that precedes such “Aha!” moments is characteristic of many types of cognitive processes besides problem-solving, including memory retrieval, language comprehension, and various forms of creativity. Although different problem-solving strategies share many common attributes, insight-derived solutions appear to be unique in several ways. In this issue, researchers from Northwestern and Drexel Universities report on studies revealing a unique neural signature of such insight solutions.”
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The root of the problem: This is your brain on math - The Globe and Mail

The root of the problem: This is your brain on math - The Globe and Mail | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“The root of the problem: This is your brain on math The Globe and Mail “As a society we have paid more attention to reading in the past few decades,” says Daniel Ansari, Canada Research Chair in developmental cognitive neuroscientist and head of...”
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Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Psyche & Neuroscience
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How We Make Decisions - Head Justifies the Heart

How We Make Decisions - Head Justifies the Heart | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“ Skip explains how understanding how people truly make decisions can help you be a better leader.”
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Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots
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Are conspiracy theories destroying democracy? - BBC News

Are conspiracy theories destroying democracy? - BBC News | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“BBC NewsAre conspiracy theories destroying democracy?BBC NewsMost of you would think I had finally lost my mind. But, for some ...”
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Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Psychology, Sociology & Neuroscience
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A Rising Empathy Gap Hurts the Poor—But Also the Economy

A Rising Empathy Gap Hurts the Poor—But Also the Economy | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Discussion is growing of an empathy gap rooted in our society's dramatic increase in inequality. As David Madland argues in Democracy,... Other research has confirmed this empathy gap. Last year, Paul Piff caused quite a stir when he published his finding that upper class individuals were, more likely to break driving laws, take goods from others, lie in a negotiation, cheat and endorse unethical behaviour (this, of course, stands at odd with Charles Murray's rather naive belief that the rich are rich because of their superior moral scruples). Piff summarizes his conclusions, While having money doesn't necessarily make anybody anything, the rich are way more likely to prioritize their own self-interests above the interests of other people. It makes them more likely to exhibit characteristics that we would stereotypically associate with, say, assholes. http://media.wix.com/ugd//80ea24_edd136e3b72b07c93775906aee3dfa35.pdf Posted by Sean McElwee
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BIG BRAIN: Brain Cortex Machine Part 1 - Intro

BIG BRAIN: Brain Cortex Machine Part 1 - Intro | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“In this machine, the cortex will have primary functions that include memory, language, thinking, asking questions, volunteering information, carrying on a conversation in natural language, and learning.”
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The Dishonesty of Honest People: A Theory of Self-Concept Maintenance by Nina Mazar, On Amir, Dan Ariely :: SSRN

The Dishonesty of Honest People: A Theory of Self-Concept Maintenance by Nina Mazar, On Amir, Dan Ariely :: SSRN | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Dishonesty plays a large role in the economy. Causes for (dis)honest behavior seem to be based partially on external rewards, and partially on internal rewards.
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Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots
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Life Story - Making Sense of the Self

Life Story - Making Sense of the Self | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
We all create internal narratives of our lives. Do these stories of ourselves simply reflect our lives, or do they determine who we are and what we can achieve?

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The Daily Brain - 10 Things You Should Know About Goals

The Daily Brain - 10 Things You Should Know About Goals | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“ David DiSalvo's newest book, Brain Changer , is now available for pre-order on Amazon and B...”
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Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
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PLOS Biology: Foundations of Neuroeconomics: From Philosophy to Practice

PLOS Biology: Foundations of Neuroeconomics: From Philosophy to Practice | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“ Evidence that neuroscience improves our understanding of economic phenomena [1–4] comes from a broad array of novel experimental findings, including demonstrations of brain regions that guide responses to fair [5,6] and unfair [7] social interactions, that resolve uncertainty during decision making [8], that track loss aversion [9] and subjective value [10], and that encode willingness to pay [11,12] and reward error signals [13,14]. Yet, neuroeconomics has been characterized as a faddish juxtaposition, not an integration, of disparate domains [15]. More damningly, critics have charged that neuroscience and economics are fundamentally incompatible [16], an argument that resonates with many social scientists. Economics thrived for centuries in the absence of neuroscience and some economists argue that existing neuroeconomics research is not useful to mainstream economics [17,18]. We reject the fundamental charge that neuroscience cannot influence economic modeling, even in principle, and focus on two criticisms of integrating these fields, which we label theBehavioral Sufficiency and Emergent Phenomenon arguments. We show here that these arguments contain hidden assumptions that render them unsound within the practical constraints of science. We go on to explore two interrelated questions: is there a unique niche for a field of neuroeconomics, and, if so, what are its proper foundational principles? We do not rely on the recent demonstrations of brain systems that support economic behavior nor recount the valid concerns about potential technological constraints of neuroscience. Rather, we attempt to clarify the necessary foundations for neuroeconomics research [19–21], for which we identify two core principles, Mechanistic Convergence and Biological Plausibility. We then ask how information about neural mechanisms improves the predictive and explanatory power of economic models. Importantly, the points we raise here recapitulate both the cognitive revolution [22] and the subsequent intertwining of cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience [23,24]. We believe that the seemingly disparate neural and social sciences have much to gain from each other ”
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Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Social Neuroscience Advances
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What is a representative brain? Neuroscience meets population science

The last decades of neuroscience research have produced immense progress in the methods available to understand brain structure and function. Social, cognitive, clinical, affective, economic, communication, and developmental neurosciences have begun to map the relationships between neuro-psychological processes and behavioral outcomes, yielding a new understanding of human behavior and promising interventions. However, a limitation of this fast moving research is that most findings are based on small samples of convenience. Furthermore, our understanding of individual differences may be distorted by unrepresentative samples, undermining findings regarding brain–behavior mechanisms. These limitations are issues that social demographers, epidemiologists, and other population scientists have tackled, with solutions that can be applied to neuroscience. By contrast, nearly all social science disciplines, including social demography, sociology, political science, economics, communication science, and psychology, make assumptions about processes that involve the brain, but have incorporated neural measures to differing, and often limited, degrees; many still treat the brain as a black box. In this article, we describe and promote a perspective—population neuroscience—that leverages interdisciplinary expertise to (i) emphasize the importance of sampling to more clearly define the relevant populations and sampling strategies needed when using neuroscience methods to address such questions; and (ii) deepen understanding of mechanisms within population science by providing insight regarding underlying neural mechanisms. Doing so will increase our confidence in the generalizability of the findings. We provide examples to illustrate the population neuroscience approach for specific types of research questions and discuss the potential for theoretical and applied advances from this approach across areas.

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cognitive-emotional interactions | Emotion & Cognition and the Brain, by Luiz Pessoa

cognitive-emotional interactions | Emotion & Cognition and the Brain, by Luiz Pessoa | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“Posts about cognitive-emotional interactions written by cognitionemotion”
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Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Social Neuroscience Advances
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From Brain Networks to Cognitive Function

From Brain Networks to Cognitive  Function | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“Olaf Sporns was asked to organize a symposium on networks for the annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science 2013 and invited four of us to present our work: Paul Laurienti, Barry ...”
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Jonathan Haidt on Moral Psychology

Jonathan Haidt on Moral Psychology | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“What can psychology tell us about morality? Jonathan Haidt, author of The Righteous Mind, discusses the place of rationality in our moral judgements in this episode of the Social Science Bites podcast.”
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Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Psychology, Sociology & Neuroscience
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Maslow's hierarchy of needs infographic

Maslow's hierarchy of needs infographic | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

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Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots
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List of cognitive biases - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

List of cognitive biases - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Although the reality of these biases is confirmed by replicable research, there are often controversies about how to classify these biases or how to explain them. Some are effects of information-processing rules (i.e. mental shortcuts), called heuristics , that the brain uses to produce decisions or judgments.


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Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions
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Poverty simulation raises awareness of poverty's effects - Washington Observer Reporter

Poverty simulation raises awareness of poverty's effects - Washington Observer Reporter | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“Poverty simulation raises awareness of poverty's effects Washington Observer Reporter W&J students spent a simulated four weeks in poverty in 15-minute segments in which they were required to pay bills, go to work, pay for transportation and manage...”
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Washing Your Hands Increases Optimism, But May Lower Your Motivation To Perform Well In The Future

Washing Your Hands Increases Optimism, But May Lower Your Motivation To Perform Well In The Future | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“A German researcher finds physical cleansing after failing a task may enhance a person's optimism but it also weakened their performance on a future task.”
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The Cambridge Handbook of Thinking and Reasoning

The Cambridge Handbook of Thinking and Reasoning | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Written by foremost authorities from cognitive psychology, cognitive science, and cognitive neuroscience, the chapters of this reference summarize basic concepts and facts of a major topic, sketch its history, and analyze the progress its research...
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