With My Right Brain
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With My Right Brain
Irrationality is predictable. We need to release "rational man" assumption.
Curated by Emre Erdogan
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The Culture, Causes, and Costs of Anxiety

The Culture, Causes, and Costs of Anxiety | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
"Few people today would dispute that chronic stress is a hallmark of our times or that anxiety has become a kind of cultural condition of mo
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Counting Sheep: The Science of Sleep

Counting Sheep: The Science of Sleep | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Counting Sheep: The Science of Sleep (RT @ucl_slms: Explore the Science of Sleep with @britishlibrary and UCL Neuroscience on March 14 http://t.co/R3lJ4kwcm2 #beautifulscience)...
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The Brain, in Exquisite Detail

The Brain, in Exquisite Detail | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Undertaking thousands of hours of work, researchers are working to create an interactive database of a healthy brain’s structure and activity, the first of its kind.
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An Antidote to the Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence

An Antidote to the Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

Let’s not idealize emotional intelligence. Like any other human skill set – IQ, hacking skills, strength – it can be used for self-serving ends or for the common good, as addressed in Adam Grant's recent article for The Atlantic titled The Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence....

 

Then there’s empathic concern, sensitivity to other people’s needs and the readiness to help if need be. Workers with such concern are the good citizens of any organization, the ones everyone else knows can be counted on to help when the pressure is on. Among leaders, those with empathic concern create a “secure base,” the sense that your boss has your back, will support and protect you as needed, and gives you the security to take risks and try new ways of operating – the key to innovation.

 

This is the kind of empathy that serves as an antidote to the dark side of emotional intelligence – the manipulative use of talents in EI in the service of one’s own interest, and at the expense of others. Narcissists, Machiavellians and sociopaths all do this, as I’ve detailed in Focus: The Hidden Driver of Excellence. A Norwegian study found that men who lacked empathic concern in childhood were far more likely than others as adults to end up as felons in prison.

 

Daniel Goleman 


Via Edwin Rutsch
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John Michel's curator insight, January 7, 2014 12:06 AM

Empathic concern means we care about the well-being of the people around us. It’s the opposite motivation of the self-serving types who use whatever influence or other empathy abilities solely in their own interests – the Bernie Madoffs among us.

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Science Says You CAN Pinpoint The Source Of Happiness.. And It's Not What Most People Think

Science Says You CAN Pinpoint The Source Of Happiness.. And It's Not What Most People Think | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Science confirmed what we've suspected all along: Caring about others actively increases our own personal happiness. Jacob Soboroff a TakePart Live (and former HuffPost Live) anchor explores the question 'What makes us happy?

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You Can’t Take It With You, but You Still Want More

You Can’t Take It With You, but You Still Want More | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
A new study illustrates humans’ deeply rooted desire to earn more than they possibly can consume.

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Overcome the Eight Barriers to Confidence

Overcome the Eight Barriers to Confidence | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Achieve your goals this year.

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Neurologist Oliver Sacks on Memory, Plagiarism, and the Necessary Forgettings of Creativity

Neurologist Oliver Sacks on Memory, Plagiarism, and the Necessary Forgettings of Creativity | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
"Memory is dialogic and arises not only from direct experience but from the intercourse of many minds."

"Memory is never a precise duplic
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The meaningful life is a road worth traveling

The meaningful life is a road worth traveling | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
A Stanford research project explored the key differences between lives of happiness and meaningfulness. While the two are similar, dramatic differences exist – and one should not underestimate the power of meaningfulness.
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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, January 6, 2014 2:37 PM

Happiness and meaningfulness distinguished and distilled!

John Michel's curator insight, January 7, 2014 12:04 AM

If happiness is about getting what you want, then meaningfulness is about expressing and defining yourself. A life of meaning is more deeply tied to a valued sense of self and one's purpose in the larger context of life and community.

Saberes Sin Fronteras OVS's curator insight, January 7, 2014 12:52 PM

la ciencia confirma hoy lo que los sabios antiguos, en el Yi-Ging chino,  proclamaban como principio basico de una vida humana: Ying y Yan, luz y sombras, vida con sentido y sinsentidos que nos va poniendo en el camino la misma realidad vital. Ambos son esenciales para vivir en realidad, no en ensueños falsos.

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The Differences Between Normal Worry & General Anxiety Disorder - World of Psychology

The Differences Between Normal Worry & General Anxiety Disorder - World of Psychology | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“ You’re worried about X, Y, and Z. You obsess about them for hours every day, maybe for weeks. How do you know whether this is typical worrying, a normal w”
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The Psychology of Lying

The Psychology of Lying | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
This infographic describes exactly what goes on in your head when you tell a lie. It describes the brain chemistry that occurs during the lie, how oft ...
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35 Scientific Concepts That Will Help You Understand The World

35 Scientific Concepts That Will Help You Understand The World | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
In order to sharpen our reasoning skills, we must have a good grasp of our own cognitive biases, as well as the basic laws of the universe. But in a dynamic world, new laws are constantly emerging.

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How Should We Live: History’s Forgotten Wisdom on Love, Time, Family, Empathy, and Other Aspects of the Art of Living

How Should We Live: History’s Forgotten Wisdom on Love, Time, Family, Empathy, and Other Aspects of the Art of Living | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
"How to pursue the art of living has become the great quandary of our age… The future of the art of living can be found by gazing into the
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Adaptively Rational.

Adaptively Rational. | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
In an economically rational world, individuals will maximize personal advantage by carefully weighing the costs and benefits of each of their decisions. Yet research in Behavioural Economics (BE) a...
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21 Interesting Facts About Our Brain

21 Interesting Facts About Our Brain | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Just a little over 20 years ago, we thought the brain’s plasticity was fixed and could not change itself. However, recent uncovering by science has debunked that myth and proven that the brain is capable of vast change.
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Selfie Syndrome - How Social Media is Making Us Narcissistic

Selfie Syndrome - How Social Media is Making Us Narcissistic | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Narcissists pursue gratification from vanity and the admiration of their own physical and intellectual attributes.

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The Power of Habit

The Power of Habit | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Ever wonder why have certain habits or why something can become addictive for you? Want some insights into how to change your bad habits and how to st ...
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Novel Genetic Patterns May Make Us Rethink Biology and Individuality - The Almagest

Novel Genetic Patterns May Make Us Rethink Biology and Individuality - The Almagest | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

Professor of Genetics Scott Williams, PhD, of the Institute for Quantitative Biomedical Sciences (iQBS) at Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine, has made two novel discoveries: first, a person can have several DNA mutations in parts of their body, with their original DNA in the rest—resulting in several different genotypes in one individual—and second, some of the same genetic mutations occur in unrelated people. We think of each person’s DNA as unique, so if an individual can have more than one genotype, this may alter our very concept of what it means to be a human, and impact how we think about using forensic or criminal DNA analysis, paternity testing, prenatal testing, or genetic screening for breast cancer risk, for example. Williams’ surprising results indicate that genetic mutations do not always happen purely at random, as scientists have previously thought. His work, done in collaboration with Professor of Genetics Jason Moore, PhD, and colleagues at Vanderbilt University, was published in PLOS Genetics journal.[1]

 

Genetic mutations can occur in the cells that are passed on from parent to child and may cause birth defects. Other genetic mutations occur after an egg is fertilized, throughout childhood or adult life, after people are exposed to sunlight, radiation, carcinogenic chemicals, viruses, or other items that can damage DNA. These later or “somatic” mutations do not affect sperm or egg cells, so they are not inherited from parents or passed down to children. Somatic mutations can cause cancer or other diseases, but do not always do so. However, if the mutated cell continues to divide, the person can develop tissue, or a part thereof, with a different DNA sequence from the rest of his or her body.

 

“We are in reality diverse beings in that a single person is genetically not a single entity—to be philosophical in ways I do not yet understand—what does it mean to be a person if we are variable within?” says Williams, the study’s senior author, and founding Director of the Center for Integrative Biomedical Sciences in iQBS. “What makes you a person? Is it your memory? Your genes?” He continues, “We have always thought, ‘your genome is your genome.’ The data suggest that it is not completely true.”

 

In the past, it was always thought that each person contains only one DNA sequence (genetic constitution). Only recently, with the computational power of advanced genetic analysis tools that examine all the genes in one individual, have scientists been able to systematically look for this somatic variation. “This study is an example of the type of biomedical research project that is made possible by bringing together interdisciplinary teams of scientists with expertise in the biological, computational and statistical sciences.” says Jason Moore, Director of the iQBS, who is also Associate Director for Bioinformatics at the Cancer Center, Third Century Professor, and Professor of Community and Family Medicine at Geisel.

 

Having multiple genotypes from mutations within one’s own body is somewhat analogous to chimerism, a condition in which one person has cells inside his or her body that originated from another person (i.e., following an organ or blood donation; or sometimes a mother and child—or twins—exchange DNA during pregnancy. Also, occasionally a person finds out that, prior to birth, he or she had a twin who did not survive, whose genetic material is still contained within their own body).[2] Chimerism has resulted in some famous DNA cases: one in which a mother had genetic testing that “proved” that she was unrelated to two of her three biological sons.[3]

 

As suggested by Maria Schnee (newphoenix.info)

 

1 Williams, Scott, et al., Recurrent tissue-specific mtDNA mutations are common in humans. http://www.plosgenetics.org/doi/pgen.1003929.


2 Strain L, Dean JC, Hamilton MP, Bonthron D. A true hermaphrodite chimera resulting from embryo amalgamation after in vitro fertilization. N Engl J Med 1998;(338):166-9/


3 Norton AT and Zehner O. Project MUSE: Today’s Research, Tomorrow’s Inspiration. http://www.academia.edu.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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This is your brain on religion: Uncovering the science of belief

This is your brain on religion: Uncovering the science of belief | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
From Pope Francis to Phil Robertson: Why are some people of faith generous — while others are nuts?

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Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Influence, EQ & Persuasion
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Difficult Conversations: Nine Common Mistakes

Difficult Conversations: Nine Common Mistakes | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 27, 2013 1:09 PM

These are excellent points.

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The Rich Think They’re Superior. That’s Deluded and Dangerous.

The Rich Think They’re Superior. That’s Deluded and Dangerous. | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
London’s mayor, Boris Johnson, drew criticism late last year for saying that economic inequality can be attributed, in part, to IQ.
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The Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence

The Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“ In some jobs, being in touch with emotions is essential. In others, it seems to be a detriment. And like any skill, being able to read people can be used for good or evil.”
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Internal Time: The Science of Chronotypes, Social Jet Lag, and Why You’re So Tired

Internal Time: The Science of Chronotypes, Social Jet Lag, and Why You’re So Tired | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Debunking the social stigma around late risers, or what Einstein has to do with teens' risk for smoking.

"Six hours' sleep for a man, sev
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Happiness is not the absence of problems, it’s the ability to deal with them.

Happiness is not the absence of problems, it’s the ability to deal with them. | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Happiness is not the absence of problems, it's the ability to deal with them.

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Joe Stafura's curator insight, December 31, 2013 12:27 PM

This concept is some timea referred to as Resilience, the ability to bounce back from a set back is the most common understanding of the benefits of being Resilent.

 

iit isn't happiness as much as SubjectI've Well Being that provides this ability to us in challenging times, it can manifest as a quiet confidence that is often contagious within groups, whether a business team or a sports team.