With My Right Brain
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With My Right Brain
Irrationality is predictable. We need to release "rational man" assumption.
Curated by Emre Erdogan
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Zygmunt Bauman - Liquid Love: On the Frailty of Human Bond

Zygmunt Bauman - Liquid Love: On the Frailty of Human Bond | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

 The uncanny frailty of human bonds, the feeling of insecurity that frailty inspires, and the conflicting desires to tighten the bonds yet keep them loose, are the principal themes of this important new book by Zygmunt Bauman, one of the most original and influential social thinkers of our time. It will be of great interest to students and scholars in sociology and in the social sciences and humanities generally, and it will appeal to anyone interested in the changing nature of human relationships.


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The Pineal Gland: Mysticism and Neuroscience

The Pineal Gland: Mysticism and Neuroscience | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
High T3ch is a blog on fun technology. Videos, gadgets, documentaries and all the fun tech stuff. (The Pineal Gland: Mysticism and Neuroscience: Explore the ins and outs of the pineal gland, along with the lat...
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Erasmus reads Kahneman, or why perfect rationality is less than it's cracked ... - Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies

Erasmus reads Kahneman, or why perfect rationality is less than it's cracked ... - Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Erasmus reads Kahneman, or why perfect rationality is less than it's cracked ...
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Behavior Change Strategy Cards - Artefact

Behavior Change Strategy Cards - Artefact | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Artefact's set of 23 cards helps designers, researchers, and anyone facing a behavior change challenge nudge people toward positive behavioral outcomes. (Have you heard of the Behavior Change Strategy Cards by @artefactgroup?
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The Science of Motivation: Your Brain on Dopamine

The Science of Motivation: Your Brain on Dopamine | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“ I spent an hour on this opening paragraph: The hour wasn’t time well spent, mind you. Sure, I was working — writing, deleting, fiddling with words here and there — but my paragraph-per-hour pace was...”
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Brain Scans Show We Take Risks Because We Can't Stop Ourselves

Brain Scans Show We Take Risks Because We Can't Stop Ourselves | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
A new study correlating brain activity with how people make decisions suggests that when individuals engage in risky behavior, such as drunk driving or unsafe sex, it's probably not because their brains' desire systems are too active, but because...

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Playing Tetris for three minutes can cut strength of cravings, study shows

Playing Tetris for three minutes can cut strength of cravings, study shows | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Visual stimulation provided by computer game can reduce cravings for food, cigarettes and alcohol, psychologists say
Playing Tetris for just three minutes can reduce the strength of cravings for food, cigarettes and alcohol, according to a study.

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Making Music Dramatically Improves Young Children’s Behaviour | PsyBlog - Understand Your Mind

Making Music Dramatically Improves Young Children’s Behaviour | PsyBlog - Understand Your Mind | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

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New Study of Improvising Jazz Pianists Shows Similar Brain Circuits Used for Music and Language | PsyBlog - Understand Your Mind

New Study of Improvising Jazz Pianists Shows Similar Brain Circuits Used for Music and Language | PsyBlog - Understand Your Mind | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
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Why does the brain remember dreams?

Why does the brain remember dreams? | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Some people recall a dream every morning, whereas others rarely recall one. In a new study, research shows that the temporo-parietal junction, an information-processing hub in the brain, is more active in high dream recallers. Increased activity in this brain region might facilitate attention orienting toward external stimuli and promote intrasleep wakefulness, thereby facilitating the encoding of dreams in memory.

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5 Reasons to Calm Down Your Analytical Mind

5 Reasons to Calm Down Your Analytical Mind | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

Our “analytical mind” is the thinking part of our brains. It mostly takes place in the prefrontal cortex, which is associated with complex decision-making, problem solving, critical thinking, and self-monitoring.

Basically, it’s the part of our brains that makes us step back and think, “What should I think here?” or “What should I do here?”

It’s a very important function of a healthy mind, but it’s also not the only function. In certain situations, it can actually be useful to calm down your analytical mind.


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Superstars of Psychology: 10 Best Short Talks (Videos) | PsyBlog - Understand Your Mind

Superstars of Psychology: 10 Best Short Talks (Videos) | PsyBlog - Understand Your Mind | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
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This algorithm can predict a revolution

This algorithm can predict a revolution | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
For students of international conflict, 2013 provided plenty to examine. There was civil war in Syria, ethnic violence in China, and riots to the point of revolution in Ukraine. For those working...
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Does Akerlof and Shiller's Animal Spirits provide a helpful new approach for macroeconomics?

Downloadable (with restrictions)! Animal Spirits (2009) is a timely and widely appreciated work focusing on the need to incorporate behavioral factors in macroeconomic analysis that draws on a famous reference of John Maynard Keynes. Nonetheless, it has a number of limitations. Those in several chapters are noted. Most important, however, the book does not break down "animal spirits" into its components, and distinguish sufficiently between (1) cognitive, (2) emotional, (3) cultural, and (4) visceral factors, or (5) those emanating from neuroeconomics. There is not enough reference to the advances of behavioral microeconomics and there is no explanation why so little progress has been made in behavioral macroeconomics despite approximately fifteen years of efforts.

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How your busy schedule could be controlling your mind - The Week Magazine

How your busy schedule could be controlling your mind - The Week Magazine | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
The Week Magazine
How your busy schedule could be controlling your mind
The Week Magazine
Starving people have food on their mind to the point of irrationality. But we all act this way when we experience scarcity.
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Daniel Kahneman, in conversation with Cass Sunstein - YouTube

On February 3, 2014, Daniel Kahneman, Nobel Prize-winning author of Thinking, Fast and Slow, spoke with Cass Sunstein, Robert Walmsley University Professor i...
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Consensual Sadomasochism May Actually Lead To Altered States Of ... - Huffington Post

Consensual Sadomasochism May Actually Lead To Altered States Of ... - Huffington Post | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Consensual Sadomasochism May Actually Lead To Altered States Of ...
Huffington Post
Medicine: Finest Fake Medicine.
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The Neuroscience Of Imagination

The Neuroscience Of Imagination | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Understanding how imagination works could be the key to daydreaming yourself into a sharper, more creative person.

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Kasia Hein-Peters's curator insight, February 21, 2014 2:40 PM

How to make your imagination work.

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Pain is a Complex Emotional and Sensory Experience (BSP 93)

Pain is a Complex Emotional and Sensory Experience (BSP 93) | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Dr. Fernando Cervero  

 

Dr. Fernando Cervero of McGill University has been studying pain since the
beginning of his career back in the 1960s.

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How Does Your Memory Work? | Head Squeeze

How Does Your Memory Work? | Head Squeeze | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
When you need to recall a memory, the brain calls on your memory network. The hippocampus and other parts of your brain work together to rebuild that memory. To remember something your brain goes through the following process: First your brain consciously registers the memory, this is called encoding. Next, the brain must consolidate the…
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Slate Video: The Amazing Elephant Capacity for Empathy

Slate Video: The Amazing Elephant Capacity for Empathy | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

=========================

The Amazing Elephant Capacity

for Empathy

They seek to reassure each other.

=========


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Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Cass Sunstein gets a lot of flack from certain groups in the States for the philosophy of Libertarian Paternalism he and Richard Thaler outlined in 'Nudge'.

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Bonobos Join Chimps as Closest Human Relatives

Bonobos Join Chimps as Closest Human Relatives | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Genome sequence reveals tantalizing clues to differences in behavior and intelligence between three species
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Bonobos, like humans, keep time to music, study shows

Bonobos, like humans, keep time to music, study shows | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

Some animals, like humans, can sense and respond to a musical beat, a finding that has implications for understanding how the skill evolved, scientists said. A study of bonobos, closely related to chimpanzees, shows they have an innate ability to match tempo and synchronize a beat with human experimenters. For the study, researchers designed a highly resonate, bonobo-friendly drum able to withstand 500 pounds of jumping pressure, chewing, and other ape-like behaviors.


“Bonobos are very attuned to sound. They hear above our range of hearing,” said Patricia Gray, a biomusic program director at University of North Carolina in Greensboro. Experimenters beat a drum at a tempo favored by bonobos – roughly 280 beats per minute, or the cadence that humans speak syllables. The apes picked up the beat and synchronized using the bonobo drum, Gray and psychologist Edward Large, with the University of Connecticut, said at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.


“It’s not music, but we’re slowing moving in that direction,” Large said. Related research on a rescued sea lion, which has no innate rhythmic ability, shows that with training, it could bob its head in time with music, said comparative psychologist Peter Cook, who began working with Ronan the sea lion while a graduate student at the University of California, Santa Cruz.


Scientists suspect that the musical and rhythmic abilities of humans evolved to strengthen social bonds, “so, one might think that a common ancestor to humans and the bonobo would have some of these capabilities,” Large said. The addition of sea lions to the list suggests that the ability to sense rhythm may be more widespread.

Gray and Large said they would like to conduct a study on whether bonobos in the wild synchronize with other members of their species when they, for example, beat on hollow trees.


“That’s really coordination. Now, you’re talking about a social interaction,” Large said. “If your brain rhythms are literally able to synchronize to someone else’s brain rhythms, that’s what communication is potentially all about.”



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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