With My Right Brain
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With My Right Brain
Irrationality is predictable. We need to release "rational man" assumption.
Curated by Emre Erdogan
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Nudging is anti-democratic and anti-political

Nudging is anti-democratic and anti-political | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

Letters: A nudge works best when its target doesn't realise it's being nudged.

There are a number of issues in Cass Sunstein's article on nudging that need addressing (We should be nudging people, not shoving, 25 April) First, a nudge works best when its target doesn't realise it's being nudged – think of the architecture of a supermarket, for example, which encourages us to buy one thing rather than another. This undermines Sunstein's claim that a nudge maintains "freedom of choice". It's true that there are plenty of things on the shelves, but a nudge will have failed if it doesn't make us choose one of those things in preference to others.

Second, Sunstein has it in for public officials, who he says have limited information and do not always have the purest of motivations. Unlike nudgers, of course, who, we are to suppose, possess perfect information and are unerringly saintly.

Guardian journalist Shiv Malik revealed the grubby side of nudging when he exposed the bogus psychometric tests inflicted on jobseekers by the Department for Work and Pensions – whatever answers were entered, the subject ended up with the same psychometric profile (Jobseekers made to carry our bogus psychometric tests, 30 April 2013). This hardly amounts to treating people with dignity – another core nudge value, according to Sunstein. 

Third, for nudgers, people are not citizens involved in the co-creation of policy, but experimental subjects to be prodded and poked in the petri dish of the behavioural economist's imagination. Sunstein has defined nudging as "libertarian paternalism" – an oxymoron rooted in the self-fulfilling prophecy that people are incapable of sound judgment. In sum, nudging is anti-democratic and anti-political, the latest in a long line of attempts to bypass the messy business of engaging citizens in grown-up debate.


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Pot physically changes your brain (but so do music lessons) - Higher Ground - Detroit Metro Times

Pot physically changes your brain (but so do music lessons) - Higher Ground - Detroit Metro Times | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

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Paul Gagnon's curator insight, April 29, 2014 9:14 PM
Read and weep...
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Why good memories are less likely to fade - BBC News

Why good memories are less likely to fade - BBC News | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
BBC News
Why good memories are less likely to fade
BBC News
... asked to keep diaries, recording the emotional intensity of their memories.

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Motor Cortex Shown to Play Active Role in Learning Movement Patterns | neuroscientistnews.com

Motor Cortex Shown to Play Active Role in Learning Movement Patterns | neuroscientistnews.com | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Skilled motor movements of the sort tennis players employ while serving a tennis ball or pianists use in playing a concerto, require precise interactions between the motor cortex and the rest of the brain. Neuroscientists had long assumed that the motor cortex functioned something like a piano keyboard.
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Neuroscience and jazz senior Mason Hankamer sees music in color - UT The Daily Texan

Neuroscience and jazz senior Mason Hankamer sees music in color - UT The Daily Texan | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
UT The Daily Texan Neuroscience and jazz senior Mason Hankamer sees music in color UT The Daily Texan Neuroscience and and Jazz performance senior Mason Hankamer experiences a fusion of colors in his mind when he plays music in a phenomenon called...
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How to Set Goals That Lead to Happiness — PsyBlog

How to Set Goals That Lead to Happiness — PsyBlog | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

People are wrong about the type of goals that will make them happiest. New research suggests that certain concrete goals for happiness work better than abstract goals.The study, published in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, may answer one of the paradoxes of happiness: why trying to be happy sometimes makes us less happy (Rudd et al., 2014).


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The Neuroscience of Desire - Less Wrong

The Neuroscience of Desire - Less Wrong | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Who knows what I want to do? Who knows what anyone wants to do? How can you be sure about something like that? Isn’t it all a question of brain chemistry, sign

The birth of neuroeconomics

Much work has been done on the affective neuroscience of desire,1 but I am less interested with desire as an emotion than I am with desire as a cause of decisions under uncertainty. This latter aspect of desire is mostly studied by neuroeconomics,2 not affective neuroscience.

From about 1880-1960, neoclassical economics proposed simple, axiomatic models of human choice-making focused on the idea that agents make rational decisions aimed at maximizing expected utility. In the 1950s and 60s, however, economists discovered some paradoxes of human behavior that violated the axioms of these models.3In the 70s and 80s, psychology launched an even broader attack on these models. For example, while economists assumed that choices among objects should not depend on how they are described ('descriptive invariance'), psychologists discovered powerful framing effects.4

In response, the field of behavioral economics began to offer models of human choice-making that fit the experimental data better than simple models of neoclassical economics did.5 Behavioral economists often proposed models that could be thought of as information-processing algorithms, so neuroscientists began looking for evidence of these algorithms in the human brain, and neuroeconomics was born.


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Psychology of Well-Being | Full text | Positive Narrative Group Psychotherapy: the use of traditional fairy tales to enhance psychological well-being and growth

Oral narrative strategies have rarely been applied in the positive psychology domain.
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Autism: 10 Facts You Should Know — PsyBlog

Autism: 10 Facts You Should Know — PsyBlog | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Autism: what are the numbers, the symptoms, the cause, the genetics and the cure?
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How The Mind Really Works: 10 Counterintuitive Psychology Studies — PsyBlog

How The Mind Really Works: 10 Counterintuitive Psychology Studies — PsyBlog | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Ten psychological findings that challenge our intuitive view of how our minds work.
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The Deadly Cost of Fashion in Vimeo Staff Picks

A photojournalist who covered last year’s deadly collapse of the Rana Plaza building in Bangladesh draws connections to New York from clothing labels he found in the rubble.


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Co-operative Behaviour: Neuroscience Insights

Co-operative Behaviour:  Neuroscience Insights | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Co-operation is essential for the functioning of human societies — and several current public policy initiatives, including health and lifestyle and environmental campaigns, depend upon it. Many attempts to persuade people to co-operate and collaborate, however, fail — or succeed for only a limited time. Understanding the neural mechanisms for co-operation can help in developing more effective ways of promoting collective behaviour and in designing policies to achieve societal aims.

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David Hain's curator insight, May 6, 2014 3:46 AM

More insights from neuroscience about how to collaborate effectively.

John Thurlbeck, FCMI FRSA's curator insight, May 7, 2014 3:05 AM

As a developing leader this is the way forward! Effective collaboration makes for great successes and mutuality is a wonderful principle to anchor your leadership behaviour upon! Thanks to David Hain for the great link!

Ruth Obadia's curator insight, May 11, 2014 2:12 AM
Co-operation with others can be inherently satisfying — and that it’s not contingent on the prospect of material reward. (A 2004 experiment, for example, found increased activity in the reward system of the brain for mutual co-operation decisions, even when controlling for the amount of money earned by the decision itself.)Playing games with another human being is more satisfying (rewarding) than playing with a computer partner.The learning of co-operative behaviour is partly dependent on reciprocation — we tend to co-operate, over the longer term, with those who behave well towards us.Co-operation can be motivated by the anticipation of guilt — activity in regions of the brain associated with ‘negative affective states’ increases when people match the expectations of other players.The ability to understand the mental states of others, traditionally referred to as ‘theory of mind’, plays an important part in co-operation.Co-operation is context-specific, depending partly on prior knowledge of others and their trustworthiness.
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Your Brain on Story: Why Narratives Win Our Hearts and Minds - Pacific Standard

Your Brain on Story: Why Narratives Win Our Hearts and Minds - Pacific Standard | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

“Your Brain on Story: Why Narratives Win Our Hearts and Minds Pacific Standard The University of California-Los Angeles' social cognitive neuroscience lab director Matthew D.”


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Paul Gagnon's curator insight, April 29, 2014 9:15 PM
The power of narrative
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Happy Brain, Happy Life

Happy Brain, Happy Life | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Happy brains are more creative, quicker, and more mentally alert

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A rough guide to spotting bad science - Decision Science News

A rough guide to spotting bad science - Decision Science News | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
A rough guide to spotting bad science

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Neuroscience and child protection

Neuroscience and child protection | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Letters: It is unhelpful for any theory to appear to trap individuals in their early experiences alone
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The Moral Collapse of US and Global Society- and the Necessary Conditions for ... - OpEdNews

The Moral Collapse of US and Global Society- and the Necessary Conditions for ... - OpEdNews | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
The Moral Collapse of US and Global Society- and the Necessary Conditions for ...
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You took the words right out of my brain: New Research Shows Brain’s Predictive Nature When Listening to Others | neuroscientistnews.com

You took the words right out of my brain: New Research Shows Brain’s Predictive Nature When Listening to Others | neuroscientistnews.com | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Our brain activity is more similar to that of speakers we are listening to when we can predict what they are going to say, a team of neuroscientists has found. The study, which appears in the Journal of Neuroscience, provides fresh evidence on the brain’s role in communication.
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Our Genes Respond Positively to The Right Kind of Happiness — PsyBlog

Our Genes Respond Positively to The Right Kind of Happiness — PsyBlog | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
The right kind of happiness doesn’t just feel great, it also benefits the body, right down to its instructional code.
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Why Does Walking Stimulate Creative Thinking?

Why Does Walking Stimulate Creative Thinking? | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Researchers at Stanford have found that walking generates creative thinking.

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