With My Right Brain
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With My Right Brain
Irrationality is predictable. We need to release "rational man" assumption.
Curated by Emre Erdogan
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Applying neuroscience to learning and development

Applying neuroscience to learning and development | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
At the CIPD conference last week a group of panellists gathered to discuss the growing role of neuroscience in learning and development.

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The Curious Effect of Depression on Intuitive Thinking Skills — PsyBlog

The Curious Effect of Depression on Intuitive Thinking Skills — PsyBlog | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
First experiment to find a link between depression and intuition.

Depression curbs people’s ability to make intuitive judgements, a new study finds for the first time.

The research may help explain why people who are depressed say they find it difficult to make ordinary, everyday decisions.

In the experiment, published in the British Journal of Clinical Psychology, half the participants had major depressive disorder, while the other were a healthy control group (Remmers et al., 2014).

Both groups were given a measure of intuitive thinking which involved finding the link between words.

 
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Michele Marchese's curator insight, November 15, 2014 8:15 PM

Depression is like being in a silent limbo, we can't make any decisions to help us move forward from the melancholy that we feel. Depression weakens our creativity, and intuitive processing. Holistic therapies such as Flower essences due to their own energetic vibrational healing, Aromatherapy essential oils such as sage, orange, lemon or sandalwood. Hypnotherapy, Reiki, and, Acupuncture, and more can help us to find the path in our mind that leads us back to our creative center. We need to be able to listen to our own natural abilities to make decision

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Neuroscience Reveals The Deep Power of Human Empathy — PsyBlog

Neuroscience Reveals The Deep Power of Human Empathy — PsyBlog | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Without empathy, human beings are lonely, disconnected creatures.
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The Father of Economics Was Also the World's First Self-Help Guru — And Can ... - TIME

The Father of Economics Was Also the World's First Self-Help Guru — And Can ... - TIME | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Adam Smith, the18th century Scotsman best known for writing The Wealth of Nations, is widely misunderstood. His insights into technology, ambition, and friendship that are as relevant today as they were in 1759.
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InfoStorms - The hardwiring of psychological biases in social information processing - iNudgeyou

InfoStorms - The hardwiring of psychological biases in social information processing  - iNudgeyou | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

The hypothesis of InfoStorms is that modern information technologies are bound to magnify and amplify phenomena for which biased individual and social information processes threaten to distort truth, making us more vulnerable to err than ever before, and on a much larger scale. Informational cascades, pluralistic ignorance, and group polarization – these are all well known phenomena to social psychologists arising from the combination of psychological biases and heuristics in social information processing.

In my new book InfoStorms, written together with Vincent F. Hendricks (Prof. of formal philosophy, University of Copenhagen), we explore how modern information technologies may amplify and magnify these phenomena making us more vulnerable to err than ever, and on a much larger scale. Basically, it’s a book about how hardwired socio-technological ‘rules of thumb’ crafted out of necessity to deal with information overload sometimes bias our individual and social decision-making to the extend where the individual as well as societal impact may become dangerous. Let’s take an example.

 


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Photography and the Feelings of Others: From Mirroring Emotions to the Theory of Mind

Photography and the Feelings of Others: From Mirroring Emotions to the Theory of Mind | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Photography is powerful because we can place ourselves into the perspective of those we see in an image. Whether it’s street photography, photojournalism o

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Daniel Kahneman Explains The Machinery of Thought | Farnam Street

Daniel Kahneman Explains The Machinery of Thought | Farnam Street | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Daniel Kahneman dissects the machinery of thought into two agents, system 1 and system two, which respectively produce fast and slow thinking.

Via Philippe Vallat, Alessandro Cerboni
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Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, August 9, 2014 2:07 PM

"One further limitation of System 1 is that it cannot be turned off..." Beside that it's useful...:-)))

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What’s Going on Inside the Brain Of A Curious Child?

What’s Going on Inside the Brain Of A Curious Child? | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
New research suggests that curiosity triggers chemical changes in the brain that help students better understand and retain information.
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How Sugar Affects The Brain | Farnam Street

How Sugar Affects The Brain | Farnam Street | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
When you eat something loaded with sugar, your taste buds, your gut and your brain all take notice. This activation of your reward system is not unlike how
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Rationality and Irrationality in Government - Video and audio - Cass Sunstein

Rationality and Irrationality in Government - Video and audio - Cass Sunstein | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

What impact is behavioural science having on politics and business? Simplified disclosure, default rules, social norms, and ‘choice architecture’ are all being used to steer people in specific directions. Are these ‘nudges’ improving our decisions? Are they offsetting irrational behaviour? Cass Sunstein, author of Nudge and the previous Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs in the Obama administration will discuss these new policies and the question they raise about freedom of choice. 

Cass Sunstein (@CassSunstein) is the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard Law School. 


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The role played by social media in political participation and electoral campaigns

The role played by social media in political participation and electoral campaigns | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Social Media has rapidly grown in importance as a forum for political activism in its different forms. Social media platforms, such as Twitter, Facebook and YouTube provide new ways to stimulate citizen engagement in political life, where elections and electoral campaigns have a central role.


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Personal communication via social media brings politicians and parties closer to their potential voters. It allows politicians to communicate faster and reach citizens in a more targeted manner and vice versa, without the intermediate role of mass media. Reactions, feedback, conversations and debates are generated online as well as support and participation for offline events. Messages posted to personal networks are multiplied when shared, which allow new audiences to be reached.

Although the presence of social media is spreading and media use patterns are changing, online political engagement is largely restricted to people already active in politics and on the Internet. Other audiences are less responsive. For example, television news together with print and online newspapers are still the most important sources of political information in most EU Member States.

Social media has reshaped structures and methods of contemporary political communication by influencing the way politicians interact with citizens and each other. However, the role of this phenomenon in increasing political engagement and electoral participation is neither clear nor simple. The upcoming European Parliament elections in May will give an indication of the impact of social media in European wide elections with national and European dimension

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How much has our media ecosystem really been democratized?: The research so far on viral effects, social media and news

How much has our media ecosystem really been democratized?: The research so far on viral effects, social media and news | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
2014 from Harvard's Shorenstein Center synthesizing a wider variety of industry data, surveys and academic literature in order to look at fundamental shifts in the media ecosystem.
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Neural correlates of strategic reasoning during competitive games

Although human and animal behaviors are largely shaped by reinforcement and punishment, choices in social settings are also influenced by information about the knowledge and experience of other decision-makers. During competitive games, monkeys increased their payoffs by systematically deviating from a simple heuristic learning algorithm and thereby countering the predictable exploitation by their computer opponent. Neurons in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) signaled the animal’s recent choice and reward history that reflected the computer’s exploitative strategy. The strength of switching signals in the dmPFC also correlated with the animal’s tendency to deviate from the heuristic learning algorithm. Therefore, the dmPFC might provide control signals for overriding simple heuristic learning algorithms based on the inferred strategies of the opponent.

 

Neural correlates of strategic reasoning during competitive games
Hyojung Seo, Xinying Cai, Christopher H. Donahue, Daeyeol Lee

Science 17 October 2014:
Vol. 346 no. 6207 pp. 340-343
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1256254


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How Humans Behave -Libertarian paternalism is not an oxymoron


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Social Comparison and Peer effects with Heterogeneous Ability

Abstract: Whether and how the observability of a coworker’s effort influences an employer’s wage decisions and workers’ effort decisions is a central issue for labor organizations. We conduct an experiment using a three-person gift-exchange game to investigate this matter in the context of wage transparency and heterogeneous abilities. We find that showing a coworker’s effort increases both wages and the difference in wages between two heterogeneously skilled workers when the more able worker is observed. The knowledge of a coworker’s effort increases the level of reciprocity exhibited by observed workers (peer effects), whereas it reduces that exhibited by workers who are observers. Overall, displaying coworker’s effort has a beneficial effect on reciprocity. Regardless of their ability, workers exert levels of effort that are positively related to those of their coworkers. This strategic complementarity of efforts is partially explained by inequity aversion.


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Neuroscience Reveals The Deep Power of Human Empathy — PsyBlog

Neuroscience Reveals The Deep Power of Human Empathy — PsyBlog | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Without empathy, human beings are lonely, disconnected creatures.
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Singletary: Picturing our financial behaviors - Dallas Morning News

Singletary: Picturing our financial behaviors - Dallas Morning News | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
The documentary ‘Thinking Money’ provides some of the ‘why’ behind your financial choices.
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The Neuroscience of Bad Habits and Why It’s Not About Will Power - Mindfulness and Psychotherapy

The Neuroscience of Bad Habits and Why It’s Not About Will Power - Mindfulness and Psychotherapy | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
We all have bad habits we want to break, but understanding the brain and mindfulness can give us a leg up.

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David Hain's curator insight, October 9, 2014 1:50 AM

We can re-write patterns that are not helping us!

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, October 10, 2014 12:01 PM

Yesss... I have some too... but you know what? I adore some of them... they are giving the special flavour being me...:-))) or... I don't know... simply I hate that everybody always want to change to somebody else.... Normally I would like to be even more myself... OK, some small things...:-)))

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, November 14, 2014 12:48 PM

I have been watching the recent anti-drug use ads the Canadian government, actually the Conservative Party under the guise of the government, with interest. Do they fall into this conversation?

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Why Your Brain Loves Good Storytelling

Why Your Brain Loves Good Storytelling | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Studying the neuroscience of compelling communication.

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Introduction to Cognitive Bias - YouTube

“ RT @alphaarchitect: Introduction to Cognitive Bias: http://t.co/pyNbXNyaqe via @YouTube”


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How to handle toxic people

This post originally appeared at LinkedIn. Follow the author here. Toxic people defy logic. Some are blissfully unaware of the negative impact that they have on those around them, and others seem to derive satisfaction from creating chaos and pushing other people’s buttons. Either way, they create unnecessary complexity, strife, and worst of all, stress....
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Behavioral economics explains monopolies, consumer issues

Behavioral economics explains monopolies, consumer issues | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Sarah Temraz - Contributing Writer Last week, on Oct. 13, the Nobel Prize for Economic Sciences was awarded to Jean Tirole, professor of economics at Toulouse University in France. Tirole has been ...
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This Beverage Reversed Normal Age-Related Memory Loss in Three Months — PsyBlog

This Beverage Reversed Normal Age-Related Memory Loss in Three Months — PsyBlog | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

Drinking this could reduce your brain age twenty years in just three months.Cocoa flavanoids — like those contained in a cup of cocoa — can reverse age-related memory loss in older adults, a new study finds.
This is the first direct evidence that an important component of memory decline that comes with age can be improved with a simple dietary change.
Typically, normal age-related memory declines are noticeable to people in their fifties and sixties: things like forgetting where the keys are or having trouble recalling a name or word.
These changes are much less severe than those which typically occur as a result of devastating dementias like Alzheimer’s disease.


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Empathic brains make faster social choices

Empathic brains make faster social choices | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

Just out these days, our recent paper in the journal Social Neuroscience is about how empathy can drive choices in social dilemmas. In this study, we use both behavioural economics and fMRI scanning to explore how individual differences in empathic ability can affect social behaviours.

This is described in the abstract:

Empathy was related to specific engagement of the mentalising network of the brain.

“Decision-making in social dilemmas is suggested to rely on three factors: the valuation of a choice option, the relative judgment of two or more choice alternatives, and individual factors affecting the ease at which judgments and decisions are made. Here, we test whether empathy—an individual’s relative ability to understand others’ thoughts, emotions, and intentions—acts as an individual factor that alleviates conflict resolution in social decision-making. We test this by using a framed, iterated prisoners’ dilemma (PD) game in two settings. In a behavioral experiment, we find that individual differences in empathic ability (the Empathy Quotient, EQ) were related to lower response times in the PD game, suggesting that empathy is related to faster social choices, independent of whether they choose to cooperate or defect. In a subsequent neuroimaging experiment, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we find that EQ is positively related to individual differences in the engagement of brain structures implemented in mentalizing, including the precuneus, superior temporal sulcus, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. These results suggest that empathy is related to the individual difference in the engagement of mentalizing in social dilemmas and that this is related to the efficiency of decision-making in social dilemmas.”

 


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Evolution of responses to (un)fairness

(...) humans and other species seem to share basic reactions to inequity, which serves to sustain cooperation. We postulate that the basic emotional reactions and calculations underlying our sense of fairness are rooted in our primate background and offer a model that places these reactions in the context of cooperative relationships.

 

Evolution of responses to (un)fairness
Sarah F. Brosnan1,*, Frans B. M. de Waal

Science 17 October 2014:
Vol. 346 no. 6207
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1251776


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