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Home - Behavioural Exchange 2014

Home - Behavioural Exchange 2014 | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Behavioural Exchange 2014 is the world’s first global public policy behavioural insights conference, bringing expert academics and practitioners from around the world to Sydney from 2-3 June 2014.

Behavioural approaches are really about “restoring common sense to economics”.  These were the provocative words of Richard Thaler – Professor Behavioral Science and Economics at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and co-author of Nudge – while speaking via video link atBX2014, the world’s first public policy behavioural insights conference, which concluded in Sydney on 3 June.  The interplay between orthodox economics, psychology, and so-called ‘common sense’ was a recurring theme of the two-day conference, which brought together leading academics and practitioners from across the world to discuss behavioural innovations in public policy.  

The conference included talks from many of the world’s leading thinkers in behavioural economics and policy making. Alongside Richard Thaler was his co-author,Cass Sunstein, and Professors Max Bazerman, Iris Bohnet, David Laibson, Michael Norton, and Michael Hiscox from Harvard’s Behavioral Insights Group.  They were joined by those at the policy making end of the spectrum, with BIT Chief Executive, Dr David Halpern, Dr Maya Shankar from the White House, and Dr Thia Jang Ping and Mr Donald Low from the Government of Singapore.  Reflecting Australia’s growing interest in applying behavioural approaches to public policy, BX2014 also brought together senior public servants from the Government of New South Wales , as well as representatives from private sector firms, such as Facebook.

The conference covered a range of topics, from the merits of design thinking and the hope of big data, to the importance of RCTs in driving evidence-based decision-making.  But it was perhaps the ethos that underpins behaviourally-informed policy that anchored the discussions.  Participants challenged speakers on the centrality of ethics and transparency in designing nudges, and the need to elevate a culture of experimentation in the public sector.  Speakers  also highlighted that the empirically-focussed approach to public policy that behavioural insights demands requires humility: we have to accept that context is critical to the success of any intervention, so we must admit that we don’t really know what will work until we have tried it and tested it to a high degree of scientific rigour. This way, by taking account of sometimes seemingly trivial details of implementation, public policy can be delivered better and with greater efficiency. 


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Irrationality is predictable. We need to release "rational man" assumption.
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Moral Effects of Socialism

Moral Effects of Socialism | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Dan Ariely and co-authors have an interesting new paper looking at moral behavior, specifially cheating, in people who grew up in either East or West Germany. From 1961 to 1989, the Berlin Wall divided one nation into two distinct political regimes.
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Does socialism cause dishonesty? - The Reality-Based Community

Does socialism cause dishonesty? - The Reality-Based Community | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Does socialism cause dishonesty? The Reality-Based Community Only somehow that's not the conclusion the authors of the study (including Don Aireley, a prominent behavioral economist and the author of a good semi-popular book on the subject,...
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Our brains: predictably irrational

Our brains: predictably irrational | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
The 3 pounds of jelly in our skulls allow us to reflect on our own consciousness -- and to make counterintuitive, irrational decisions. These talks explore why.
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A Theory of Representative Behavior in the Dictator Game

Abstract: In this paper we present a model of representative behavior in the dictator game. Individuals have simultaneous and non-contradictory preferences over monetary payoffs, altruistic actions and equity concerns. We require that these behaviors must be aggregated and founded in principles of representativeness and empathy. The model results match closely the observed mean split and replicate other empirical regularities (for instance, higher stakes reduce the willingness to give). In addition, we connect representative behavior with an allocation rule built on psychological and behavioral arguments. An approach consistently neglected in this literature. Key words: Dictator Game, Behavioral Allocation Rules, Altruism, Equity Concerns, Empathy, Self-interest JEL classification
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Is there (still) a continental-analytic divide in philosophy?

Is there (still) a continental-analytic divide in philosophy? | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
by Massimo Pigliucci As is well known (to philosophers), perhaps one of the most controversial, often even acrimonious [1], splits in modern philosophy is the one between the so-called “analytic” a...

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Consciousness as a Fundamental Building in the Universe | Science and Nonduality

Consciousness as a Fundamental Building in the Universe | Science and Nonduality | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
In this wonderful TED talk the philosopher David Chalmers invites for a new paradigm in science in which consciousness is established as a fundamental and
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‘Rational expectations’ — nonsense on stilts

‘Rational expectations’ — nonsense on stilts | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
from Lars Syll Assumptions in scientific theories/models are often based on (mathematical) tractability (and so necessarily simplifying) and used for more or less self-evidently necessary theoretic...
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How The Brain Processes The Emotions — PsyBlog

How The Brain Processes The Emotions — PsyBlog | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Tastes good? Despite how individual our emotions feel to us, the brain processes them in a remarkably similar way.

The brain translates emotions into a standard code that’s similar across people, a new study finds. While happiness and sadness might feel quite different to us, the brain actually represents these emotions in a remarkably similar way (Cornell University neuroscientist Adam Anderson, senior author of the study, explains: “We discovered that fine-grained patterns of neural activity within the orbitofrontal cortex, an area of the brain associated with emotional processing, act as a neural code which captures an individual’s subjective feeling. Population coding of affect across stimuli, modalities and individuals.” This finding contrasts to the established view which is that there are specific, separate regions in the brain for positive and negative emotions.


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Rethinking the Placebo Effect: How Our Minds Actually Affect Our Bodies

Rethinking the Placebo Effect: How Our Minds Actually Affect Our Bodies | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
The startling physiological effects of loneliness, optimism, and meditation.

In 2013, Neil deGrasse Tyson hosted a mind-bending debate on

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Why Are Babies So Cute? - YouTube

What makes babies so AWW? Video on UGLY animals: http://youtu.be/8nYpVlTdr3I SUBSCRIBE - it's free!: http://bit.ly/10kWnZ7 FOLLOW US! Links below: Instagram ... (Why Are #Babies So Cute?
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Shared decisions benefit next generations

Shared decisions benefit next generations | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

A controlled voting system can help a community manage resources sustainably so that future generations can still enjoy them, according to a study published today in Nature1 and re-enacted in this Nature Video. Having empirical support for the long-held view that people are mostly cooperative could help to design better public policies aimed at preserving shared resources, such as clean air or fish stocks.

There’s plenty of evidence to suggest that people are not purely self-interested. But although economists have long studied how people cooperate in groups, they have not looked specifically at whether individuals are happy to share resources with future generations, who cannot return the favour


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Joachim Low's leadership dilemma

Joachim Low's leadership dilemma | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Michael Ballack points to the back (Lahm playing right back. Löw hasn't read Danny Kahnemann, unlike @honigstein http://t.co/kBOzdVyFIr)
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Tony Coady – Trusting Emotion, Trusting Reason: A False Dichotomy - Practical Ethics (blog)

Tony Coady – Trusting Emotion, Trusting Reason: A False Dichotomy - Practical Ethics (blog) | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Tony Coady – Trusting Emotion, Trusting Reason: A False Dichotomy Practical Ethics (blog) Coady attributes this preoccupation with finding 'errors' and 'biases' to the extremely successful work of Kahneman and Tversky, who spent much of their...
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Why our brains love the ocean: Science explains what draws humans to the sea - Salon

Why our brains love the ocean: Science explains what draws humans to the sea - Salon | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Salon Why our brains love the ocean: Science explains what draws humans to the sea Salon In 2008 Steve founded Sands Research, a company that does neuromarketing, a new field using behavioral and neurophysiological data to track the brain's...
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Eye Movements Reveal Difference Between Love And Lust

Eye Movements Reveal Difference Between Love And Lust | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Soul singer Betty Everett once proclaimed, “If you want to know if he loves you so, it’s in his kiss.” But a new study by University of Chicago researchers suggests the difference between love and lust might be in the eyes after all. Specifically, where your date looks at you could indicate whether love or…
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What's so funny? Deconstructing Humor

What's so funny? Deconstructing Humor | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“The laughter spills out of her like a jar of coins enriching the nearby surroundings. How does this burst of vocalized joy, unique in this form only to our species, define our personalities and impact our social relationships? A recent study of humor in children explains where the funny bone is: your brain. ”
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Ecologically Rational Choice and the Struc... [J Exp Psychol Gen. 2014] - PubMed - NCBI

Ecologically Rational Choice and the Struc... [J Exp Psychol Gen. 2014] - PubMed - NCBI | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
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Your Brain Is On the Brink of Chaos - Issue 15: Turbulence - Nautilus

Your Brain Is On the Brink of Chaos - Issue 15: Turbulence - Nautilus | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
In one important way, the recipient of a heart transplant ignores its new organ: Its nervous system usually doesn’t rewire to communicate…
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Linking Perception, Cognition, and Action: Psychoph... [PLoS One. 2014] - PubMed - NCBI

Linking Perception, Cognition, and Action: Psychoph... [PLoS One. 2014] - PubMed - NCBI | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
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"Nudging" Policy: Behavioral Economics in the Public Square | Institute of Politics - YouTube

Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein, authors of Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness joined moderators Nava Ashra, Associate Professor...
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Solving social problems with a nudge

Solving social problems with a nudge | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
MacArthur winner Sendhil Mullainathan uses the lens of behavioral economics to study a tricky set of social problems -- those we know how to solve, but don't. We know how to reduce child deaths due to diarrhea, how to prevent diabetes-related blindness and how to implement solar-cell technology ... yet somehow, we don't or can't. Why?

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Scientists explain how memories stick together - PsyPost

Scientists explain how memories stick together - PsyPost | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Scientists at the Salk Institute have created a new model of memory that explains how neurons retain select memories a few hours after an event. This new framework provides a more complete picture of how memory works, which can inform research into disorders liked Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, post-traumatic stress and learning disabilities. “Previous models of memoryRead More

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Study Cracks How the Brain Processes Emotions

Study Cracks How the Brain Processes Emotions | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
A new study reports on how the brain codes and processes emotions.
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Thinking Slow About Thinking Fast – Part I - Brain Blogger (blog)

Thinking Slow About Thinking Fast – Part I - Brain Blogger (blog) | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Thinking Slow About Thinking Fast – Part I Brain Blogger (blog) In recent years, our so-called irrational behavior has become a popular topic, and research from behavioral economics, psychology, and neuroscience has begun to be applied to...
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Behavioral economics: Rich boys more competitive

Behavioral economics: Rich boys more competitive | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Why do we make the choices that we do? Are we born this way or have we become this way? Behavioral economists are looking for answers by the use of economics and math exercises in the laboratory.
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