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Learning Challenging New Skills Like Photography Improves Memory

Learning Challenging New Skills Like Photography Improves Memory | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Three-month-long experiment demonstrates the importance of challenging new activities for older minds.
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Irrationality is predictable. We need to release "rational man" assumption.
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A formal model of interpersonal inference. [Front Hum Neurosci. 2014] - PubMed - NCBI

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
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Learning Theory v5 - What are the established learning theories?

Learning Theory v5 - What are the established learning theories? | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
This Concept Map, created with IHMC CmapTools, has information related to: Learning Theory v5, Organisation Kolb, Psychology Vygotsky, Psychology Bloom, Piaget genetic epistemology, Psychology Skinner, Montessori constructivism, Dewey constructivism, radical constructivism Knowledge as mental representation: 1a. Knowledge is not passively received either through the senses or by way of communication; 1b. Knowledge is actively built up by the cognising subject; 2a. The function of cognition is adaptive, in the biological sense of the term, tending towards fit or viability; 2b Cognition serves the subject’s organization of the experiential world, not the discovery of an objective ontological reality., social constructivism connectivism, Taylor Organisation, Holt homeschooling, unschooling, constructivism radical constructivism, Kolb experiental learning, Montessori Montessori education, Social anthropology Lave & Wenger, Vygotsky zone of proximal development, Lave & Wenger situated learning, Education Illich, scientific pedagogy Education based on science that modified and improved the individual., communities of practice Groups of people who share a concern or a passion for something they do and learn how to do it better as they interact regularly.

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, April 1, 4:37 AM
Learning theories
Bookmarking Librarian's curator insight, April 2, 3:35 PM

Learning theories

JulieLaRoche's curator insight, April 12, 8:00 AM

I love infographics like this that depict the 10,000 foot view to show the overall subject, the various theories or parts, and how the pieces fit together and influence one another.

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Virtues and Sins part V: Humilitas vs. Superbia | Anne-Maria Yritys

... group processes – Alone in the Crowd: The Structure and Spread of Loneliness in a Large Social Network” in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology Cacioppo, J.T., Fowler, J.H., and Christiakis, N.A.
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What next, the 'Cortisol Index'? - optionMONSTER Research

What next, the 'Cortisol Index'? - optionMONSTER Research | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
What next, the 'Cortisol Index'?
optionMONSTER Research
But all of the work done in behavioral economics has exposed our various psychological biases, which tend to hurt us in our trading and investing.
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How does memory work? | The Edynco blog

How does memory work? | The Edynco blog | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

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Tom Perran's curator insight, March 23, 6:32 AM

Interactive learning map that shows how we get and keep new information

David Baker's curator insight, March 24, 12:20 PM

Memory and the interactive modeling of both how it works and how to support memory are topics of interest for teachers.

Connie Hamilton Ed.S.'s curator insight, April 12, 8:54 PM

If we want to help our students to learn efficiently, we should know something about functioning of our memory.

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Happiness is Contagious and Powerful on Social Media — PsyBlog

Happiness is Contagious and Powerful on Social Media — PsyBlog | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Study of over one billion status updates finds that positive emotions are more contagious than negative.

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Why Time Feels Like It Passes Quicker As You Get Older - Lifehacker Australia

Why Time Feels Like It Passes Quicker As You Get Older - Lifehacker Australia | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Why Time Feels Like It Passes Quicker As You Get Older
Lifehacker Australia
As Dan Ariely explains over at The Wall Street Journal, we tend to fall into familiar routines as we age and that makes time move quickly.
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Psychology: 'An Owner's Manual for Your Own Mind' - The Atlantic

Psychology: 'An Owner's Manual for Your Own Mind' - The Atlantic | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Psychology: 'An Owner's Manual for Your Own Mind'
The Atlantic
We've also seen the rise of behavioral economics, a new discipline where psychology rubs up against classical microeconomics.
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Trying Not to Try - Issue 10: Mergers & Acquisitions - Nautilus

Trying Not to Try - Issue 10: Mergers & Acquisitions - Nautilus | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
In a famous story from ancient Chinese philosophy, Butcher Ding has been called upon to play his part in a traditional religious ceremony.…
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Noahpinion: Behavioral economics vs. behavioral finance

Noahpinion: Behavioral economics vs. behavioral finance | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
RT @davdittrich: RT @LisaKramer: "Behavioral economics vs. behavioral finance" - a good comparison:
http://t.co/klrHw2fYoH
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Biases and Implicit Knowledge - Munich Personal RePEc Archive

Biases and Implicit Knowledge - Munich Personal RePEc Archive | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

Abstract

 

A common explanation for biases in judgment and choice has been to postulate two separate processes in the brain: a “System 1” that generates judgments automatically, but using only a subset of the information available, and a “System 2” that uses the entire information set, but is only occasionally activated. This theory faces two important problems: that inconsistent judgments often persist even with high incentives, and that inconsistencies often disappear in within-subject studies. In this paper I argue that these behaviors are due to the existence of “implicit knowledge”, in the sense that our automatic judgments (System 1) incorporate information which is not directly available to our reflective system (System 2). System 2 therefore faces a signal extraction problem, and information will not always be efficiently aggregated. The model predicts that biases will exist whenever there is an interaction between the information private to System 1 and that private to System 2. Additionally it can explain other puzzling features of judgment: that judgments become consistent when they are made jointly, that biases diminish with experience, and that people are bad at predicting their own future judgments. Because System 1 and System 2 have perfectly aligned preferences, welfare is well-defined in this model, and it allows for a precise treatment of eliciting preferences in the presence of framing effects.


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The Self Is Not Defined by the Boundaries of Our Skin

The Self Is Not Defined by the Boundaries of Our Skin | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
The mind is not only embodied but shaped by our relationships as well.

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A Feeling for Fiction

A Feeling for Fiction | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Books, movies, and plays are more than just entertainment, says psychologist and novelist Keith Oatley. They train us in the art of being human. He explains how fictional works nurture empathy and enhance our social and emotional lives.


When we examine this process of identification in fiction, we appreciate the importance of empathy—not only in enjoying works of literature, but in helping us form connections with those around us in the real world. 


=======================

These effects derive from our cognitive
capacity for empathy, and there are
indications that they can help shape
our relationships with friends, family,
and fellow citizens.

========


By Keith Oatley 

GreaterGood.berkeley.edu


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Start Living More As Your Future Self

Start Living More As Your Future Self | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

How often do you think about your future self? It could make all the difference in how happy and successful you are later in life.

You see, one of the biggest factors in making smart decisions is knowing when to pay short-term costs for long-term benefits. It’s about keeping the future in mind.

But for many, especially in our fast-paced world, there is a tendency for “instant gratification.” We want things now, not later – even if that means rejecting a much bigger reward in the future.

If you don’t think about your future self, and only consider your needs and wants in the present moment, then that can often lead to a lot of impulsive decisions that later come back to bite your ass.

True intelligence requires that we act with a long-term mindset. We need to pay attention to how what we do today is going to ultimately influence where we are tomorrow.


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Can 'love hormone' protect against addiction?

Can 'love hormone' protect against addiction? | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
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The hot hand effect gets hot again - Significance Magazine

The hot hand effect gets hot again - Significance Magazine | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Significance Magazine The hot hand effect gets hot again Significance Magazine Since Gilovich, Vallone, and Tversky published their analysis of basketball shot-making on the Philadelphia 76ers in 1985 and concluded that there was no evidence of a...
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The long reach of reason

The long reach of reason | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“Here’s a TED first: an animated Socratic dialog! In a time when irrationality seems to rule both politics and culture, has reasoned thinking finally lost its power? Watch as psychologist Steven...
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It Doesn’t Hurt to Look, Does It?

It Doesn’t Hurt to Look, Does It? | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
The real effect of pornography on relationships.
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Daniel Kahneman: 'We're beautiful devices'

Daniel Kahneman: 'We're beautiful devices' | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Called the world's most important psychologist, Daniel Kahneman inspired the trend for pop-psychology books, won a Nobel in economics and has devoted his life to studying the logic of irrationality ("Richard Thaler told an interviewer, Kahneman and...
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Mark Waser's curator insight, March 20, 9:55 AM

A nice phrasing after the previous . . . .

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The Neuroscience of Decision Making Explained in 30 Seconds - Wired

The Neuroscience of Decision Making Explained in 30 Seconds - Wired | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
The Neuroscience of Decision Making Explained in 30 Seconds Wired For instance, Daniel Kahneman demonstrated with Amos Tversky that the negative emotional impact of losses is twice as intense as the positive effect of gains, which affects our...
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The psychology of hate: How we deny human beings their humanity

The psychology of hate: How we deny human beings their humanity | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
From slavery to genocide, society has shown a terrifying ability to disregard the personhood of others. Here's why
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"Predicting the unpredictable" in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

"Predicting the unpredictable" in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
"Predicting the unpredictable" in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. I conducted my first presentiment experiment in 1996. As of today this type of experiment has been repeated something like 40 times by a dozen labs.
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Dishonesty increases creativity, study says - The Columbiachronicle

Dishonesty increases creativity, study says - The Columbiachronicle | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Dishonesty increases creativity, study says The Columbiachronicle Francesca Gino, associate professor of business administration at Harvard Business School, and Dan Ariely, professor of psychology and behavioral economics at Duke University,...
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The Gorgeous Reality of Not Being Liked by Everyone

The Gorgeous Reality of Not Being Liked by Everyone | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
We want everyone to like us, but we shouldn’t.

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The Compassion Gap

The Compassion Gap | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

There is an income gap in America, but just as important is a compassion gap. Plenty of successful people see a picture of a needy child and their first impulse is not to help but to reproach.

To break cycles of poverty, we have the tools to improve high school graduation rates, reduce teen pregnancies and increase employment. What we lack is the will to do so.

 

There may be neurological biases at work. A professor at Princeton found that our brains sometimes process images of people who are poor or homeless as if they were not humans but things.

 

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Likewise, psychology experiments suggest

that affluence may erode compassion. 

===============

 

by Nicholas Kristof


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