With My Right Brain
Follow
9.9K views | +9 today
 
Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from 21C Learning Innovation
onto With My Right Brain
Scoop.it!

New Study: Brain Neuronal Networks

New Study: Brain Neuronal Networks | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

"A paper published in a special edition of the journal Science proposes a novel understanding of brain architecture using a network representation of connections within the primate cortex. Zoltán Toroczkai, professor of physics at the University of Notre Dame and co-director of the Interdisciplinary Center for Network Science and Applications, is a co-author of the paper "Cortical High-Density Counterstream Architectures."

 

Using brain-wide and consistent tracer data, the researchers describe the cortex as a network of connections with a "bow tie" structure characterized by a high-efficiency, dense core connecting with "wings" of feed-forward and feedback pathways to the rest of the cortex (periphery). The local circuits, reaching to within 2.5 millimeters and taking up more than 70 percent of all the connections in the macaque cortex, are integrated across areas with different functional modalities (somatosensory, motor, cognitive) with medium- to long-range projections.

 

The authors also report on a simple network model that incorporates the physical principle of entropic cost to long wiring and the spatial positioning of the functional areas in the cortex. They show that this model reproduces the properties of the connectivity data in the experiments, including the structure of the bow tie. The wings of the bow tie emerge from the counterstream organization of the feed-forward and feedback nature of the pathways. They also demonstrate that, contrary to previous beliefs, such high-density cortical graphs can achieve simultaneously strong connectivity (almost direct between any two areas), communication efficiency, and economy of connections (shown via optimizing total wire cost) via weight-distance correlations that are also consequences of this simple network model.

 

This bow tie arrangement is a typical feature of self-organizing information processing systems. The paper notes that the cortex has some analogies with information-processing networks such as the World Wide Web, as well as metabolism, the immune system and cell signaling. The core-periphery bow tie structure, they say, is "an evolutionarily favored structure for a wide variety of complex networks" because "these systems are not in thermodynamic equilibrium and are required to maintain energy and matter flow through the system." The brain, however, also shows important differences from such systems. For example, destination addresses are encoded in information packets sent along the Internet, apparently unlike in the brain, and location and timing of activity are critical factors of information processing in the brain, unlike in the Internet.

 

"Biological data is extremely complex and diverse," Toroczkai said. "However, as a physicist, I am interested in what is common or invariant in the data, because it may reveal a fundamental organizational principle behind a complex system. A minimal theory that incorporates such principle should reproduce the observations, if not in great detail, but in extent. I believe that with additional consistent data, as those obtained by the Kennedy team, the fundamental principles of massive information processing in brain neuronal networks are within reach.""

 


Via HBEsbin
more...
No comment yet.
With My Right Brain
Irrationality is predictable. We need to release "rational man" assumption.
Curated by Emre Erdogan
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

Oxytocin, testosterone, and human social cognition. - PubMed - NCBI

Oxytocin, testosterone, and human social cognition. - PubMed - NCBI | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc. 2015 Jan 28. doi: 10.1111/brv.12175. [Epub ahead of print]
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

In the face of uncertainty, the brain chooses randomness as the best strategy - PsyPost

In the face of uncertainty, the brain chooses randomness as the best strategy - PsyPost | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Past experience is usually a reliable guide for making decisions, but in unpredictable and challenging situations, it might make more sense to take risks. ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

'From Man to Bacteria': W.D. Hamilton, the theory of inclusive fitn... - PubMed - NCBI

Stud Hist Philos Biol Biomed Sci. 2015 Jan 13;49C:45-54. doi: 10.1016/j.shpsc.2014.12.001. [Epub ahead of print]
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Panel 1: Risk, Choice and Autonomy – Behavioral Economics and Choice Architectures

Panel 1: Risk, Choice and Autonomy – Behavioral Economics and Choice Architectures | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Choice Architecture in Democracies: Exploring the Legitimacy of NudgingConference, Humboldt-University Berlin, Jan 12-14th 2015

Is “nudging” – as outlined by Cass Sunstein and Richard H. Thaler in their controversial concept of libertarian paternalism – a modern and efficient tool of governance or a dangerous attack on freedom and individual autonomy? Legal, economic and other experts will discuss the political, ethical and constitutional ramifications of nudging in a two-day conference at Berlin, beginning with a public lecture delivered by Cass Sunstein.


Via Alessandro Cerboni
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

Shared pain brings people together: study - PsyPost

Shared pain brings people together: study - PsyPost | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
What doesn’t kill us may make us stronger as a group, according to findings from new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Associat ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

A Surprising Way to Quiet Your Inner Critic

A Surprising Way to Quiet Your Inner Critic | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Self-criticism has many faces. It might be a subtle push toward producing better work, or it might be an aggressive or abusive assertion that you’re wrong, bad or seriously flawed, said Ali Miller, MFT, a therapist in private practice in Berkeley...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

You might be wrong about Behavioral Economics - and it doesn't matter | Paul M. Cohen | LinkedIn

You might be wrong about Behavioral Economics - and it doesn't matter | Paul M. Cohen | LinkedIn | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

Frontiers | Video Games as Tools to Achieve Insight into Cognitive Processes | Cognition

Video Games as Tools to Achieve Insight into Cognitive Processes
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

People show 'blind insight' into decision making performance - PsyPost

People show 'blind insight' into decision making performance - PsyPost | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
People can gauge the accuracy of their decisions, even if their decision making performance itself is no better than chance, according to a new study publi ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Social Neuroscience Advances
Scoop.it!

Neuroscience fiction

Neuroscience fiction | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
After two decades of almost complete dominance, a few bright souls started speaking up, asking: are all these brain studies really telling us much as we think they are?
Via Luca Baptista, Jocelyn Stoller
more...
Jocelyn Stoller's curator insight, January 2, 1:21 PM

Computational neuroscience and neuroinformatics have advanced quite a bit, helping scientists understand the actual limitations and potentials of these tools. Not everyone keeps up . . . and there are knee jerk backlashes as well as overly quick adoption of claims.

Lon Woodbury's curator insight, January 2, 11:54 PM

The search for the definitive answer continues, and the past candidates are now seen as simplistic to the extent of wrong.  Remember reading about when all professionals believed the universe was like a big mechanical clock? -Lon

Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

Tracking Is Easy; Persuasion Is Hard - MediaPost Communications

Tracking Is Easy; Persuasion Is Hard - MediaPost Communications | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
The 2014 election cycle was all about implementing core campaign toolsets fueled by deep political data.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

David Brooks commentary: Behavioral economics can work wonders - Columbus Dispatch

David Brooks commentary: Behavioral economics can work wonders - Columbus Dispatch | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Most of us don’t save enough. When governments try to encourage saving, they usually enact big policies to increase the incentives. But, in Kenya, people were given a lockable metal box — a simple place to put their money.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

How cultures around the world make decisions

How cultures around the world make decisions | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Is the American obsession with individual freedom really such a great idea? What other cultures know about how to make good choices.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

How Do We Increase Empathy?

How Do We Increase Empathy? | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
A column about a buddy who dealt with the consequences of poverty and inequality sparked a conversation about empathy, or the lack thereof.
Emre Erdogan's insight:

Probably the biggest empathy generator is cuteness: paedomorphic features such as large eyes, a large head, and a small lower face,”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

Daniel Dennett: How does the brain store beliefs? - PsyPost

Daniel Dennett: How does the brain store beliefs? - PsyPost | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
What if beliefs could be surgically inserted into a patient's brain? This is the basis of one of philosopher Daniel Dennett's thought experiments in exploration of how the brain represents beliefs. ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
Scoop.it!

People prefer fair, but does the brain?

People prefer fair, but does the brain? | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Whether for oneself or for others, fairness is preferred by people, but the brain network changes depending on who is actually benefiting. "In previous studies," explains the lead investigator, "we found the same tendency to reject unfair offers regardless of whether the decision involved the subjects themselves or a third party. Brain imaging, however, suggested that the brain was working differently in the two situations."

Via Alessandro Cerboni
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Social networks in primates: smart and tolerant species have more efficient networks : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group

Social networks in primates: smart and tolerant species have more efficient networks : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Network optimality has been described in genes, proteins and human communicative networks. In the latter, optimality leads to the efficient transmission of information with a minimum number of connections. Whilst studies show that differences in centrality exist in animal networks with central individuals having higher fitness, network efficiency has never been studied in animal groups. Here we studied 78 groups of primates (24 species). We found that group size and neocortex ratio were correlated with network efficiency. Centralisation (whether several individuals are central in the group) and modularity (how a group is clustered) had opposing effects on network efficiency, showing that tolerant species have more efficient networks. Such network properties affecting individual fitness could be shaped by natural selection. Our results are in accordance with the social brain and cultural intelligence hypotheses, which suggest that the importance of network efficiency and information flow through social learning relates to cognitive abilities.

Via Alessandro Cerboni
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Social Status and Personality Traits

Abstract: In this study we provide direct evidence on the relationship between social status and personality traits. Using survey data from the 2006-2012 waves of the HRS, we show that individuals’ self-perceived social status is associated with all the “Big Five” personality traits, after controlling for observable characteristics that arguably reflect one’s actual status. We also construct an objective status measure that in turn is influenced by personality traits. Objectively measured status is positively but not highly correlated with its subjective counterpart and, when incorporated in a regression specification, still leaves room for direct effects of personality traits on status perception. 


Via Alessandro Cerboni
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots
Scoop.it!

The Science of Storytelling: Why Telling a Story is the Most Powerful Way to Activate Our Brains

The Science of Storytelling: Why Telling a Story is the Most Powerful Way to Activate Our Brains | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
A good story can make or break a presentation, article, or conversation. But why is that? When Buffer co-founder Leo Widrich started to market his product through stories instead of benefits and bullet points, sign-ups went through the roof. Here he shares the science of why storytelling is so uniquely powerful.

Via Rob Duke, Jocelyn Stoller
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

Frontiers | Building a bridge—an archeologist's perspective on the evolution of causal cognition | Cognitive Science

The cognitive capacities of fossil humans cannot be studied directly. Taking the evolution of causal cognition as an example this article demonstrates the use of bridging arguments from archaeological finds as starting point via identification/classification, behavioral reconstruc-tions, and cognitive interpretations to psychological models. Generally, tool use is linked to some causal understanding / agent construal as the tool broadens the subject’s specific capabil-ities by adding new characters to its action sphere. In human evolution, the distance between the primarily perceived problem and the solution satisfying this need increased markedly: from simple causal relations to effective chaining in secondary/modular tool use, and further to the use of composite tools, complementary tool sets and notional tools. This article describes the evolution of human tool behavior from the perspective of problem-solution-distance and dis-cusses the implications for a linked development of causal cognition.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Empathy: The Missing Ingredient

Empathy: The Missing Ingredient | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Realistically, we all know there is no magic bullet to get our children – and especially our teenagers – to listen to us. However, we often bypass an important step on the way to delivering life lessons. That step is empathy.Unlike sympathy, which is the capacity to feel pity or sorrow for another’s misfortune, empathy is the ability to understand and share the feelings of another, whatever those feelings may be. As a parent – or a therapist for that matter – to empathize is to fully accept and acknowledge a child’s perspective without trying to change it. Bear in mind that acceptance is not agreement, and you may empathize with a person without agreeing with her.
Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

Policies rooted in human behavior can produce small miracles - Helena Independent Record

Policies rooted in human behavior can produce small miracles - Helena Independent Record | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Most of us don’t save enough. When governments try to encourage saving, they usually enact big policies to increase the incentives. But, in Kenya, people were given a lockable metal
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

How To Use Psychological Torment Self-Improvement And Profit - io9

How To Use Psychological Torment Self-Improvement And Profit - io9 | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
This post isn't as evil as it sounds because it's yourself you'll be tormenting. The method you will use is counterfactual thinking. If you use it right, you can wring money from the gullible and improve all kinds of things about yourself...
more...
No comment yet.