With My Right Brain
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Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots
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This Is Why You're Late All The Time (And What To Do About It)

This Is Why You're Late All The Time (And What To Do About It) | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“Last week, HuffPost blogger Greg Savage asked the question, "How Did It Get to be OK for People to Be Late for Everything?" And if the 350,000 Facebook likes (and counting) on his post are any indication, he's not the only one wondering.”
Via Luis Valdes, Jocelyn Stoller
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With My Right Brain
RIrrationality is predictable. We need to release "rational man" assumption.
Curated by Emre Erdogan
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Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
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A meta-analysis of state-of-the-art electoral prediction from Twitter data

Electoral prediction from Twitter data is an appealing research topic. It seems relatively straightforward and the prevailing view is overly optimistic. This is problematic because while simple approaches are assumed to be good enough, core problems are not addressed. Thus, this paper aims to (1) provide a balanced and critical review of the state of the art; (2) cast light on the presume predictive power of Twitter data; and (3) depict a roadmap to push forward the field. Hence, a scheme to characterize Twitter prediction methods is proposed. It covers every aspect from data collection to performance evaluation, through data processing and vote inference. Using that scheme, prior research is analyzed and organized to explain the main approaches taken up to date but also their weaknesses. This is the first meta-analysis of the whole body of research regarding electoral prediction from Twitter data. It reveals that its presumed predictive power regarding electoral prediction has been rather exaggerated: although social media may provide a glimpse on electoral outcomes current research does not provide strong evidence to support it can replace traditional polls. Finally, future lines of research along with a set of requirements they must fulfill are provided.
  
Via Alessandro Cerboni
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Belief in a zero-sum game: Scientists develop a new way to compare individuals and cultures - PsyPost

Belief in a zero-sum game: Scientists develop a new way to compare individuals and cultures - PsyPost | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
We rely on fundamental theories about the social world and how it works to guide our behavior in everyday life. These generalized beliefs about ourselves, ...

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How the brain reads music: The evidence for musical dyslexia - PsyPost

How the brain reads music: The evidence for musical dyslexia - PsyPost | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Music education in the western world often emphasizes musical literacy, the ability to read musical notation fluently. But this is not always an easy task ...
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The Rational Emotions exchange, part 3: Between Jewish stories and behavioral ... - Jewish Journal

The Rational Emotions exchange, part 3: Between Jewish stories and behavioral ... - Jewish Journal | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Jewish Journal
The Rational Emotions exchange, part 3: Between Jewish stories and behavioral ...
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The Science Of Why You Should Spend Your Money On Experiences, Not Things

The Science Of Why You Should Spend Your Money On Experiences, Not Things | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
You don't have infinite money. Spend it on stuff that research says makes you happy.
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Frontiers | Love-related changes in the brain: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study | Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

Romantic love is a motivational state associated with a desire to enter or maintain a close relationship with a specific other person.
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Carrot or stick in motor learning - Nature.com

Nature.com
Carrot or stick in motor learning
Nature.com
Carrot or stick: the manner by which reward and punishment affects motor learning is a long-standing question in education, sports, therapy and beyond.
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Rats, reasoning, and rehabilitation: Neuroscientists uncovering how we reason - Medical Xpress

Rats, reasoning, and rehabilitation: Neuroscientists uncovering how we reason - Medical Xpress | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Even rats can imagine: A new study finds that rats have the ability to link cause and effect such that they can expect, or imagine, something happening even if it isn't.
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Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
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"Dressing down" is a status symbol for the elite

"Dressing down" is a status symbol for the elite | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Dress for success. 

The casual outfit that Facebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg sported in front of elegantly dressed bankers and investors just before his company went public generated much clamor in the media. While some observers judged the young entrepreneur’s choice to wear his typical hoodie and jeans on such an official occasion as a mark of immaturity, others defended it as a sign of boldness that helped spread publicity about the deal.

Why is the “CEO Casual” look sported by Zuckerberg, Apple CEO Steve Jobs, and certain other business leaders interpreted as a sign of status, while other professionals in casual dress would be laughed out of a job interview? Our research explores the conditions under which nonconforming behaviors, such as wearing red sneakers in a professional setting or entering a luxury boutique wearing gym clothes, lead to attributions of enhanced status and competence rather than social disapproval.


Via Alessandro Cerboni
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The Rational Emotions exchange, Part 2: Are Israelis too competitive for peace? - Jewish Journal

The Rational Emotions exchange, Part 2: Are Israelis too competitive for peace? - Jewish Journal | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Jewish JournalThe Rational Emotions exchange, Part 2: Are Israelis too competitive for peace?Jewish JournalHis research interests include microeconomics, finance, game theory, and behavioral economics.
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McDonald's Behavioral Economics: Random Rewards Work Better - AdAge.com

McDonald's Behavioral Economics: Random Rewards Work Better - AdAge.com | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
mcdonald's super bowl campaign tapped into a core behavioral economics principle: rewards work better when they're random.
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Behavioral Economics – the greatest trick a psychologist ever pulled?

Behavioral Economics – the greatest trick a psychologist ever pulled? | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Daniel Kahneman, the author of ‘Thinking, Fast and Slow’, hates Behavioral
Economics.. 

Read on to find out more from Tonic's own Charlie Richards on Behavioral
Economics
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Temptation Bundling…..A Coffee + A Task = A Productive Day

Temptation Bundling…..A Coffee + A Task = A Productive Day | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Katherine Milkman, an assistant professor at the Wharton School at U. of
PA.  Her interest in behavioral economics led her to discover a
motivational technique she calls "temptation bundling".
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Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
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on "Wishful Thinking"

on "Wishful Thinking" | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Social Scientists traditionally regard people's beliefs about the future to be exogenous to their desires and wishes. It's one thing to want something to happen, but it doesn't suppose to affect our beliefs that it will.  My grandfather's German passport which I found among my dad's documents (see photo) shows how beliefs can be intermingled with wishes. Hugo Winter, a Jewish businessman from Koenigsberg, escaped Nazi Germany in 1934 to Palestine, leaving behind a flourishing business, a huge villa, and many friends and relatives. He never wanted to replace his fancy lifestyle in Germany

Via Alessandro Cerboni
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Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Social Neuroscience Advances
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New emotion recognition model: Humans perceive feelings of others via pattern recognition

New emotion recognition model: Humans perceive feelings of others via pattern recognition | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Philosophers at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum have put forward a new model that explains how humans recognise the emotions of others. According to their theory, humans are capable of perceiving feelings directly via pattern recognition.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Frontiers | Previous knowledge can induce an illusion of causality through actively biasing behavior | Cognition

It is generally assumed that the way people assess the relationship between a cause and an outcome is closely related to the actual evidence existing about the co-occurrence of these events. However, people’s estimations are often biased, and this usually translates into illusions of causality. Some have suggested that such illusions could be the result of previous knowledge-based expectations. In the present research we explored the role that previous knowledge has in the development of illusions of causality. We propose that previous knowledge influences the assessment of causality by influencing the decisions about responding or not (i.e., presence or absence of the potential cause), which biases the information people are exposed to, and this in turn produces illusions congruent with such biased information. In a non-contingent situation in which participants decided whether the potential cause was present or absent (Experiment 1), the influence of expectations on participants’ judgments was mediated by the probability of occurrence of the potential cause (determined by participants’ responses). However, in an identical situation, except that the participants were not allowed to decide the occurrence of the potential cause, only the probability of the cause was significant, not the expectations or the interaction. Together, these results support our hypothesis that knowledge-based expectations affect the development of causal illusions by the mediation of behavior, which biases the information received.
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How Testosterone and Oxytocin Hormones Interact In Male Work and Parenting Effort • SJS

How Testosterone and Oxytocin Hormones Interact In Male Work and Parenting Effort • SJS | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Adrian Jaeggi, University of California, Santa Barbara and Ben Trumble, University of California, Santa Barbara Much of human behavior is influenced by hormones. There’s cortisol, involved in our stress response and energy balance.
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Cognitive Neuroscience Society » Blog Archive » Babies Learn Language Socially

Cognitive Neuroscience Society » Blog Archive » Babies Learn Language Socially | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Learning how we learn languages is so neat- Cognitive Neuroscience Society » Blog Archive » http://t.co/FGiP9KWmtS
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Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from ToK Essays November 2015
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Frontiers | Bayesian Action&Perception: Representing the World in the Brain | Frontiers in Neuroscience

Theories of perception seek to explain how sensory data are processed to identify previously experienced objects, but they usually do not consider the decisions and effort that goes into acquiring ...

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ToKTutor's curator insight, March 29, 7:04 AM

Titles 4 & 5: Brains, robots & algorithms: Using math knowledge to strip perception down to its complex components.

Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
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Social Nudges: Their Mechanisms and Justification

In this paper I argue that the use of social nudges, policy interventions to induce voluntary cooperation in social dilemma situations, can be defended against two ethical objections which I call objections from coherence and autonomy.

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Timing of Kindness Evidence from a Field Experiment

Abstract: We conduct a field experiment in a naturally occurring labor environment and track whether the performance of workers responds to unexpected wage increases. Specifically, we investigate how the timing of wage increases affects efforts. We find that workers performance is about 11% higher for the same total wage when their wage is increased in two steps as opposed to a single increase at the outset. Moreover, workers are more honest and are more willing to do voluntary extra work after surprising wage increases compared to a baseline condition without increases.


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Our Brain Sees Known Words As Pictures

Our Brain Sees Known Words As Pictures | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Given the fact that writing is a relatively recent invention, scientists are keen to understand how we read and recognize words as our brains cannot have evolved a dedicated mechanism for reading.
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ToKTutor's curator insight, April 2, 6:42 AM

Titles 4 & 5: Language & knowledge: theory proposes that we learn words as whole units not simple phonetic sounds.

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The Psychology of Lying

The Psychology of Lying | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Have you thought about the psychology of lying? This article and infographic address who lies, why they lie, what they lie about and more!
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Ethics of behavioral economics: Nudges or manipulation?

Ethics of behavioral economics: Nudges or manipulation? | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
The field of behavior economics includes the study of how and why people make the decisions they do and consequently, it's the study of how to change people's decisions to push them in different di...
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Kahneman: Clients Driven by Losses, Not Gains - ThinkAdvisor

Kahneman: Clients Driven by Losses, Not Gains - ThinkAdvisor | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Advice from the father of behavioral finance on the perils of hindsight, the power of client regret and what really sets apart Warren Buffett.
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