With My Right Brain
Follow
10.5K views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Cooperation Theory & Practice
onto With My Right Brain
Scoop.it!

Phys.Org Mobile: Punishment promotes human cooperation when people trust each other

"In high-trust societies, punishment is likely to be viewed as attempts to enforce cooperative norms, which encourages others to behave according to such norms. In high-trust societies people may be more likely to notice norm violations such as free-riding on public transportation or having loudphone conversations in public places. And they may be more likely to enforce cooperative norms, also because they trust others to support such norm enforcement. Over time, such activities promote trust and cooperation in such a manner that norm enforcement is less often called for." 


Via Howard Rheingold
Emre Erdogan's insight:

Beleşçileri cezalandırmak her zaman şart...

more...
Howard Rheingold's curator insight, July 16, 2013 4:16 PM

In my Literacy of Cooperation course, people often express dismay over evidence that punishment plays a role in cooperation. Perhaps the word Ostrom uses, "sanctions," sounds prettier. But this is yet more evidence that informal punishment of those who transgress norms flows from and lends strength to cooperative societies.

With My Right Brain
RIrrationality is predictable. We need to release "rational man" assumption.
Curated by Emre Erdogan
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

Stirling Behavioural Science Blog : List of Behavioral Economics Masters Programs in Europe

Stirling Behavioural Science Blog : List of Behavioral Economics Masters Programs in Europe | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
MSc programmes in Behavioural Economics/Behavioural Science including the @stirlingeconpsy #stirbsc MSc http://t.co/3M05x4tFmS
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

Predicting replication

Predicting replication | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
The Behavioural Economics Replication Project: This project will provide evidence of how accurately peer prediction markets can forecast replication of scientific experiments in economics. In order...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

Continuing Education... Phil Rosenzweig on Leadership, Decisions, and Behavioral Economics | EconTalk | Library of Economics and Liberty

Continuing Education... Phil Rosenzweig on Leadership, Decisions, and Behavioral Economics | EconTalk | Library of Economics and Liberty | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
This week's guest, Phil Rosenzweig joined EconTalk host Russ Roberts to talk about his new book, Left Brain, Right Stuff. We'd like to know what you took away from this week's recorded conversation, and hopefully spark some more here online....
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

Research chat: Dan Ariely and Malcolm Gladwell on writing about social science - Journalist's Resource

Research chat: Dan Ariely and Malcolm Gladwell on writing about social science - Journalist's Resource | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Duke economist Dan Ariely and New Yorker writer Malcolm Gladwell in conversation about social science and journalism.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
Scoop.it!

A meta-analysis of state-of-the-art electoral prediction from Twitter data

Electoral prediction from Twitter data is an appealing research topic. It seems relatively straightforward and the prevailing view is overly optimistic. This is problematic because while simple approaches are assumed to be good enough, core problems are not addressed. Thus, this paper aims to (1) provide a balanced and critical review of the state of the art; (2) cast light on the presume predictive power of Twitter data; and (3) depict a roadmap to push forward the field. Hence, a scheme to characterize Twitter prediction methods is proposed. It covers every aspect from data collection to performance evaluation, through data processing and vote inference. Using that scheme, prior research is analyzed and organized to explain the main approaches taken up to date but also their weaknesses. This is the first meta-analysis of the whole body of research regarding electoral prediction from Twitter data. It reveals that its presumed predictive power regarding electoral prediction has been rather exaggerated: although social media may provide a glimpse on electoral outcomes current research does not provide strong evidence to support it can replace traditional polls. Finally, future lines of research along with a set of requirements they must fulfill are provided.
  
Via Alessandro Cerboni
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Belief in a zero-sum game: Scientists develop a new way to compare individuals and cultures - PsyPost

Belief in a zero-sum game: Scientists develop a new way to compare individuals and cultures - PsyPost | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
We rely on fundamental theories about the social world and how it works to guide our behavior in everyday life. These generalized beliefs about ourselves, ...

Via Alessandro Cerboni
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

How the brain reads music: The evidence for musical dyslexia - PsyPost

How the brain reads music: The evidence for musical dyslexia - PsyPost | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Music education in the western world often emphasizes musical literacy, the ability to read musical notation fluently. But this is not always an easy task ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

The Rational Emotions exchange, part 3: Between Jewish stories and behavioral ... - Jewish Journal

The Rational Emotions exchange, part 3: Between Jewish stories and behavioral ... - Jewish Journal | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Jewish Journal
The Rational Emotions exchange, part 3: Between Jewish stories and behavioral ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

The Science Of Why You Should Spend Your Money On Experiences, Not Things

The Science Of Why You Should Spend Your Money On Experiences, Not Things | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
You don't have infinite money. Spend it on stuff that research says makes you happy.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

Frontiers | Love-related changes in the brain: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study | Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

Romantic love is a motivational state associated with a desire to enter or maintain a close relationship with a specific other person.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

Carrot or stick in motor learning - Nature.com

Nature.com
Carrot or stick in motor learning
Nature.com
Carrot or stick: the manner by which reward and punishment affects motor learning is a long-standing question in education, sports, therapy and beyond.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

When It Comes To Buying Decisions, Why Feelings Come First

When It Comes To Buying Decisions, Why Feelings Come First | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
People make buying decisions based on something that is really hard to measure: how we feel. Our Planet Money team reports on the holy grail of economics: knowing what consumers are going to do.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

Study finds social interaction before economic transactions raises fairness - AroundtheO

Study finds social interaction before economic transactions raises fairness - AroundtheO | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
AroundtheO
Study finds social interaction before economic transactions raises fairness
AroundtheO
...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

Why we make bad decisions

Why we make bad decisions | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Dan Gilbert presents research and data from his exploration of happiness -- sharing some surprising tests and experiments that you can also try on yourself. Watch through to the end for a sparkling Q&A with some familiar TED faces.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Social Media and the Elections

In the United States, social media sites—such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube—are currently being used by two out of three people (1), and search engines are used daily (2). Monitoring what users share or search for in social media and on the Web has led to greater insights into what people care about or pay attention to at any moment in time. Furthermore, it is also helping segments of the world population to be informed, to organize, and to react rapidly. However, social media and search results can be readily manipulated, which is something that has been underappreciated by the press and the general public.

In times of political elections, the stakes are high, and advocates may try to support their cause by active manipulation of social media. For example, altering the number of followers can affect a viewer's conclusion about candidate popularity. Recently, it was noted that the number of followers for a presidential candidate in the United States surged by over 110 thousand within one single day, and analysis showed that most of these followers are unlikely to be real people (3).

 


Via Alessandro Cerboni
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
Scoop.it!

on "Wishful Thinking"

on "Wishful Thinking" | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Social Scientists traditionally regard people's beliefs about the future to be exogenous to their desires and wishes. It's one thing to want something to happen, but it doesn't suppose to affect our beliefs that it will.  My grandfather's German passport which I found among my dad's documents (see photo) shows how beliefs can be intermingled with wishes. Hugo Winter, a Jewish businessman from Koenigsberg, escaped Nazi Germany in 1934 to Palestine, leaving behind a flourishing business, a huge villa, and many friends and relatives. He never wanted to replace his fancy lifestyle in Germany

Via Alessandro Cerboni
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Social Neuroscience Advances
Scoop.it!

New emotion recognition model: Humans perceive feelings of others via pattern recognition

New emotion recognition model: Humans perceive feelings of others via pattern recognition | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Philosophers at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum have put forward a new model that explains how humans recognise the emotions of others. According to their theory, humans are capable of perceiving feelings directly via pattern recognition.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

Frontiers | Previous knowledge can induce an illusion of causality through actively biasing behavior | Cognition

It is generally assumed that the way people assess the relationship between a cause and an outcome is closely related to the actual evidence existing about the co-occurrence of these events. However, people’s estimations are often biased, and this usually translates into illusions of causality. Some have suggested that such illusions could be the result of previous knowledge-based expectations. In the present research we explored the role that previous knowledge has in the development of illusions of causality. We propose that previous knowledge influences the assessment of causality by influencing the decisions about responding or not (i.e., presence or absence of the potential cause), which biases the information people are exposed to, and this in turn produces illusions congruent with such biased information. In a non-contingent situation in which participants decided whether the potential cause was present or absent (Experiment 1), the influence of expectations on participants’ judgments was mediated by the probability of occurrence of the potential cause (determined by participants’ responses). However, in an identical situation, except that the participants were not allowed to decide the occurrence of the potential cause, only the probability of the cause was significant, not the expectations or the interaction. Together, these results support our hypothesis that knowledge-based expectations affect the development of causal illusions by the mediation of behavior, which biases the information received.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

How Testosterone and Oxytocin Hormones Interact In Male Work and Parenting Effort • SJS

How Testosterone and Oxytocin Hormones Interact In Male Work and Parenting Effort • SJS | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Adrian Jaeggi, University of California, Santa Barbara and Ben Trumble, University of California, Santa Barbara Much of human behavior is influenced by hormones. There’s cortisol, involved in our stress response and energy balance.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emre Erdogan
Scoop.it!

Cognitive Neuroscience Society » Blog Archive » Babies Learn Language Socially

Cognitive Neuroscience Society » Blog Archive » Babies Learn Language Socially | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Learning how we learn languages is so neat- Cognitive Neuroscience Society » Blog Archive » http://t.co/FGiP9KWmtS
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from ToK Essays November 2015
Scoop.it!

Frontiers | Bayesian Action&Perception: Representing the World in the Brain | Frontiers in Neuroscience

Theories of perception seek to explain how sensory data are processed to identify previously experienced objects, but they usually do not consider the decisions and effort that goes into acquiring ...

Via ToKTutor
more...
ToKTutor's curator insight, March 29, 7:04 AM

Titles 4 & 5: Brains, robots & algorithms: Using math knowledge to strip perception down to its complex components.