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Currency of Empathy: THE MISSING LINK TO INNOVATION AND INCLUSION

Currency of Empathy: THE MISSING LINK TO INNOVATION AND INCLUSION | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

I had the pleasure and honor of attending and speaking at the 2013 Ashoka Future Forum http://www.ashokafutureforum.com/ in Washington, D.C. last week. Amazing, humbling, inspiring.

 

Jackie Acho

http://currencyofempathy.wordpress.com

 

Jackie is President of The Acho Group, a strategy and leadership consulting firm.  Prior to founding The Acho Group in 2005, she was a Partner in the global strategy firm McKinsey & Company.  Jackie has worked for industrial, scientific, academic, nonprofit, and economic development clients on a variety of issues, with particular focus on growth, strategy, technology commercialization, and leadership development for more than 18 years.  Jackie’s work includes developing uncommon and productive collaborations across organizations and internal boundaries, even among competitors.


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With My Right Brain
Irrationality is predictable. We need to release "rational man" assumption.
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How Does Your Ego Impact Your Decision Making?

How Does Your Ego Impact Your Decision Making? | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Do you know of anyone who has suppressed bad news to preserve their career or reputation?Or told the boss what they wanted to hear instead of the truth?Or overlooked a red flag to preserve the sense of harmony in the workplace?Most often ego is catalogued as 'good' or 'bad', but what if it's simply about your relationship with yourself? At the heart of the matter your ego, your self-esteem, self-worth and personal sense of security, chaperons your decision-making. Does the business culture have an impact on your ego?It’s absurd to pretend that the business culture doesn’t have an

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Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, February 27, 3:48 AM

"...Transformational leaders have a habit of boldly going to those shadow sides, greet the skeletons, so you can get to know yourself from every angle and so you can strengthen your comfort with being in your skin..."

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The Neuroscience of Making a Decision

The Neuroscience of Making a Decision | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Various brain regions work together during the decision-making process.

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Developmental psychology research examines the role of empathy in sharing

Developmental psychology research examines the role of empathy in sharing | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Preschoolers already recognize what it feels like to be left out when goodies are being shared. In a new study, Researchers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ...
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Attribution: How People Explain Behavior

Attribution: How People Explain Behavior | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
In social psychology, attribution involves making inferences about the behaviors of others. Attributions, however, are often prone to errors and biases.
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The Racial Bias in Our Empathy

The Racial Bias in Our Empathy | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

Science is highlighting the link between empathy and familiarity, with a focus on racial bias. A new study from the University of Queensland School of Psychology is showing that if we want to increase our capacity for empathy, we need to familiarize ourselves with those who neither look nor act like us.

A number of studies in the past have shown that empathy has a strong racial component. This explains why 2,000 people can die in some far off land and the news barely makes a blip in the West. Meanwhile, a train derailing and killing eight will get wall to wall coverage. It’s not that those eight lives are worth more than the 2,000 lost somewhere else, but the viewers reaction to those eight deaths will be remarkably different. The news, being a for-profit business, knows this and uses the method to boost ratings.

However, this new University of Queensland study differs from previous work in this field by showing us this racial bias towards empathy isn’t set in stone, as previously thought.


by Lizabeth Paulat


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Frontiers | Fairness requires deliberation: The primacy of economic over social considerations | Cognitive Science

While both economic and social considerations of fairness and equity play an important role in financial decision-making, it is not clear which of these two motives is more primal and immediate and...
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New Algorithm Illuminates Free Will - h+ Media

New Algorithm Illuminates Free Will - h+ Media | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Findings from experiments at Stanford have recorded the brain signals when a primate exercises free will by changing its mind.
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This is your brain on coupons

This is your brain on coupons | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

Is your husband worth more than $10? According to a new study, the answer may not be quite so clear to your brain.

Today, the Mountain View, CA-based Web site Coupons.com and noted neurologist Dr. Paul Zak announced the findings of a study that explores the brain’s response to receiving a coupon. In one case, a woman who received a $10 coupon experienced a higher count of the hormone that has been connected to feeling love and trust than another woman experienced before her wedding ceremony.


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Researchers cut down procrastination by making it less fun - PBS NewsHour

Researchers cut down procrastination by making it less fun - PBS NewsHour | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Researchers delved into how to stop students from letting online distractions keep them from getting work done. Photo by Blake Patterson The key to making
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Notes from Behavioral Economics Workshop with Dan Ariely

Notes from Behavioral Economics Workshop with Dan Ariely | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Last summer I attended a two-day workshop at Duke University hosted by Dr. Dan Ariely on Behavioral Economics in the investment realm. Dr. Ariely is a professor, well known author (i.e. Predictably...
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Time-Inconsistent Planning: A Computational Pro...

Time-Inconsistent Planning: A Computational Pro... | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
In many settings, people exhibit behavior that is inconsistent across time --- we allocate a block of time to get work done and then procrastinate, or put effort into a project and then later fail to complete it.
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Outsmart Your Own Biases

Outsmart Your Own Biases | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

How to broaden your thinking and make better decisions. 

Suppose you’re evaluating a job candidate to lead a new office in a different country. On paper this is by far the most qualified person you’ve seen. Her responses to your interview questions are flawless. She has impeccable social skills. Still, something doesn’t feel right. You can’t put your finger on what—you just have a sense. How do you decide whether to hire her?

You might trust your intuition, which has guided you well in the past, and send her on her way. That’s what most executives say they’d do when we pose this scenario in our classes on managerial decision making. The problem is, unless you occasionally go against your gut, you haven’t put your intuition to the test. You can’t really know it’s helping you make good choices if you’ve never seen what happens when you ignore it.


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Stirling Behavioural Science Blog : List of Behavioral Economics Masters Programs in Europe

Stirling Behavioural Science Blog : List of Behavioral Economics Masters Programs in Europe | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
MSc programmes in Behavioural Economics/Behavioural Science including the @stirlingeconpsy #stirbsc MSc http://t.co/3M05x4tFmS
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Moral decisions can be manipulated by eye tracking technology

Moral decisions can be manipulated by eye tracking technology | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Moral decisions can be influenced by tracking moment to moment movements of the eyes during deliberation, finds new research from Lund University, Sweden, ...

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100 Years of Brand Storytelling (Infographic)

100 Years of Brand Storytelling (Infographic) | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Earlier this month, when we were discussing brand authenticity, you may have noticed that “authentic” brands share at least one common characteristic: They’re storytellers. Today’s open and h…

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Alex Delfosse's curator insight, May 12, 12:02 PM

This infograph is quite obviously a timeline as portrayed by the use of dates and evolutionary based title. The general design is quite appealing and I like the use of general classifications. That said I feel giving the images a small bold 2pt border could draw more attention to the series of events portrayed .

Dominique Taste's curator insight, May 13, 2:06 PM

Une amusante infographie américaine dont on peut transposer les dates pour faire apparaître 5 étapes récurrentes dans la construction d'un "storytelling" :

1. raconter 1 histoire à une audience de masse

2. raconter des histoires sur mesure selon les cibles

3. utiliser les histoires d'autres pour renforcer sa visibilité

4. devenir un producteur et éditeur d'histoires

5. inciter ses audiences à relayer et raconter ces histoires.

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Is Our Psychology More Nature or Nurture? 29 Million Twins Reveal All - PsyBlog

Is Our Psychology More Nature or Nurture? 29 Million Twins Reveal All - PsyBlog | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
14.5 million pairs of twins reveal the root cause of your personality, intelligence, propensity for mental illness and health.
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10 Cognitive Biases That Can Lead to Bad Decisions

10 Cognitive Biases That Can Lead to Bad Decisions | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
CFOs should try to overcome these cognitive biases, or predospositions, and urge their finance teams to do the same, says TRI Corp.'s Thomas Conine.

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Want to Teach Kids Empathy? Try Music.

Want to Teach Kids Empathy? Try Music. | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
A new study recently found that children who simultaneously participate in a physically engaging, time-based activity feel more positively towards each and can experience greater empathy for one another.

According to the lead author of the study, “[s]ynchrony is like a glue that brings people together — it’s a magical connector for people.


“‘The findings might be applied to formulate new strategies for education in our effort to build a more collaborative and empathic future society,’ she said.



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The Surprising Brain Differences Between Democrats and Republicans

The Surprising Brain Differences Between Democrats and Republicans | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Two new studies further support the theory that our political decision making could have a neurological basis.
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What’s the Point of a Professor?

What’s the Point of a Professor? | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
We used to be mentors and moral authorities. You can’t become a moral authority if you rarely challenge students in class and engage them beyond it. If we professors do not do that, the course is not an induction of eager minds into an enlarging vision. It is a requirement to fulfill. Only our assistance with assignments matters. When it comes to students, we shall have only one authority: the grades we give. We become not a fearsome mind or a moral light, a role model or inspiration. We become accreditors..

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Dr. Dan Siegel - Explains Mirror Neurons in Depth - YouTube

Dr. Dan Siegel tells us how mirror neurons work and how humans react when mirror neurons are stimulated.

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Want Kids To Eat Healthy? Make Their Meals More Like McDonald's - Huffington Post

Want Kids To Eat Healthy? Make Their Meals More Like McDonald's - Huffington Post | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Applying the McDonald's Happy Meal treatment to healthy foods could make kids more likely to eat them.
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Neural Mechanisms of Gain–Loss Asymmetry in Temporal Discounting

Abstract

Humans typically discount future gains more than losses. This phenomenon is referred to as the “sign effect” in experimental and behavioral economics. Although recent studies have reported associations between the sign effect and important social problems, such as obesity and incurring multiple debts, the biological basis for this phenomenon remains poorly understood. Here, we hypothesized that enhanced loss-related neural processing in magnitude and/or delay representation are causes of the sign effect. We examined participants performing intertemporal choice tasks involving future gains or losses and compared the brain activity of those who exhibited the sign effect and those who did not. When predicting future losses, significant differences were apparent between the two participant groups in terms of striatal activity representing delay length and in insular activity representing sensitivity to magnitude. Furthermore, participants with the sign effect exhibited a greater insular response to the magnitude of loss than to that of gain, and also a greater striatal response to the delay of loss than to that of gain. These findings may provide a new biological perspective for the development of novel treatments and preventive measures for social problems associated with the sign effect.

 


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New insight into how brain makes memories - PsyPost

New insight into how brain makes memories - PsyPost | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Every time you make a memory, somewhere in your brain a tiny filament reaches out from one neuron and forms an electrochemical connection to a neighboring ...
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