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How Does the Brain React to a Romantic Breakup?: Scientific American

How does the brain react to a romantic breakup?
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Love hurts...
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With My Right Brain
Irrationality is predictable. We need to release "rational man" assumption.
Curated by Emre Erdogan
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High heels may enhance a man’s instinct to be helpful

High heels may enhance a man’s instinct to be helpful | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
French study is the first to investigate the effect of a woman’s shoe heels on men’s behavior New York | Heidelberg, 19 November 2014 If it’s help
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Static network structure can stabilize human cooperation

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Eğer ağ "istikrarlı" ise, işbirliği eğilimi artıyormuş. Putnam'ın aşırı coğrafi hareketliliğin sosyal sermaye birikimine zarar verdiği önermesinin matematiksel kanıtı... Meraklısına....

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The Psychological Advantage of Unfalsifiability: The Appeal of Unte... - PubMed - NCBI

The Psychological Advantage of Unfalsifiability: The Appeal of Unte... - PubMed - NCBI | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
J Pers Soc Psychol. 2014 Nov 17. [Epub ahead of print]
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How to Be Efficient: Dan Ariely’s 6 New Secrets...

How to Be Efficient: Dan Ariely’s 6 New Secrets... | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
It’s hard to be efficient. Sometimes it feels like the world doesn’t make any sense. Sometimes youdon’t make any sense. And sometimes it feels like…
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A Scientific Macroeconomic Model Derived from Fundamental Equation of Economics by James J. Wayne :: SSRN

A Scientific Macroeconomic Model Derived from Fundamental Equation of Economics by James J. Wayne :: SSRN | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Abstract:      
The poor performance of macroeconomic models during the great recession of 2008 has forced many economists to re-examine macroeconomic theories, and search for creditable alternatives to the popular dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) models. This paper derives a new macroeconomic model from recently published Fundamental Equation of Economics (FEOE) and applies the new model to answer a general question what causes economic crises. The macro model known as the indeterministic balance sheet plus (IBS+) model proposed in this paper for the first time turns out to be a special breed of accounting models. Different accounting models are more or less same in the way of handling empirical accounting data and flow of funds, and different in the way of forecasting the future. The IBS+ macroeconomic model takes the indeterministic view of the future balance sheets with the emphasis on probabilistic causalities, tail risks, economic reality described by balance sheet accounting, truthfully capturing the sectorial flow of funds and dynamics of economics, universally applicability, and a rock solid scientific theoretical foundation. The IBS+ model is very different from the popular dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) models and agent-based computational economic (ACE) models. Through a side by side comparison, we prove that IBS+ model is superior to DSGE or ACE models in many ways. This paper concludes that DSGE models are probably intellectual dead ends, and economists should stop investing heavily with DSGE models and instead should replace DSGE models with IBS+ models. Economic crises have plagued humanity since the dawn of capitalism. Despite intense studies over last several hundred years, the questions about causes, forecasting, and prevention of economic crises remains unsolved. This paper proposes a classification of causes of economic crises using IBS+ models to analyze balance sheets of key economic sectors. Applying this classification to examine recent economic crises, we conclude that most economic crises are caused by mismanagement of balance sheets by key economic players. This paper suggests that economic crises are largely caused by inevitable misbehavior of humanity and not caused by any fundamental flaw of capitalism. Just like improving the individual health and personal hygiene is the key to prevent epidemic diseases in societies, the key to prevent future economic crises is to promoting financial disciplines and strengthening risk management of key players in economics. Because some economic crises can be caused by natural and man-made factors beyond the scope of economics like earthquakes and wars, the frequency of economic crises can be minimized by proper risk management practices but economic crises can never be completely eliminated. Historically, treating mismanagement of balance sheets as main causes of economic crises is a generalization of Austrian business cycle theory, Fisher’s debt deflation theory, and Minsky’s financial instability hypothesis.

Via Alessandro Cerboni
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Getting Children Out of Poverty Requires a Two-Generation Approach

Getting Children Out of Poverty Requires a Two-Generation Approach | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
A new strategy is emerging that recognizes the importance of creating opportunity for the entire family, coordinating programs and policies so that parents and children have a chance to succeed -- together....
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Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Psyche & Neuroscience
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Applying neuroscience to learning and development

Applying neuroscience to learning and development | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
At the CIPD conference last week a group of panellists gathered to discuss the growing role of neuroscience in learning and development.

Via Anne Leong
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The Curious Effect of Depression on Intuitive Thinking Skills — PsyBlog

The Curious Effect of Depression on Intuitive Thinking Skills — PsyBlog | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
First experiment to find a link between depression and intuition.

Depression curbs people’s ability to make intuitive judgements, a new study finds for the first time.

The research may help explain why people who are depressed say they find it difficult to make ordinary, everyday decisions.

In the experiment, published in the British Journal of Clinical Psychology, half the participants had major depressive disorder, while the other were a healthy control group (Remmers et al., 2014).

Both groups were given a measure of intuitive thinking which involved finding the link between words.

 
Via Alessandro Cerboni
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Michele Marchese's curator insight, November 15, 8:15 PM

Depression is like being in a silent limbo, we can't make any decisions to help us move forward from the melancholy that we feel. Depression weakens our creativity, and intuitive processing. Holistic therapies such as Flower essences due to their own energetic vibrational healing, Aromatherapy essential oils such as sage, orange, lemon or sandalwood. Hypnotherapy, Reiki, and, Acupuncture, and more can help us to find the path in our mind that leads us back to our creative center. We need to be able to listen to our own natural abilities to make decision

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Neuroscience Reveals The Deep Power of Human Empathy — PsyBlog

Neuroscience Reveals The Deep Power of Human Empathy — PsyBlog | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Without empathy, human beings are lonely, disconnected creatures.
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The Father of Economics Was Also the World's First Self-Help Guru — And Can ... - TIME

The Father of Economics Was Also the World's First Self-Help Guru — And Can ... - TIME | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Adam Smith, the18th century Scotsman best known for writing The Wealth of Nations, is widely misunderstood. His insights into technology, ambition, and friendship that are as relevant today as they were in 1759.
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InfoStorms - The hardwiring of psychological biases in social information processing - iNudgeyou

InfoStorms - The hardwiring of psychological biases in social information processing  - iNudgeyou | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

The hypothesis of InfoStorms is that modern information technologies are bound to magnify and amplify phenomena for which biased individual and social information processes threaten to distort truth, making us more vulnerable to err than ever before, and on a much larger scale. Informational cascades, pluralistic ignorance, and group polarization – these are all well known phenomena to social psychologists arising from the combination of psychological biases and heuristics in social information processing.

In my new book InfoStorms, written together with Vincent F. Hendricks (Prof. of formal philosophy, University of Copenhagen), we explore how modern information technologies may amplify and magnify these phenomena making us more vulnerable to err than ever, and on a much larger scale. Basically, it’s a book about how hardwired socio-technological ‘rules of thumb’ crafted out of necessity to deal with information overload sometimes bias our individual and social decision-making to the extend where the individual as well as societal impact may become dangerous. Let’s take an example.

 


Via Alessandro Cerboni
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Photography and the Feelings of Others: From Mirroring Emotions to the Theory of Mind

Photography and the Feelings of Others: From Mirroring Emotions to the Theory of Mind | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Photography is powerful because we can place ourselves into the perspective of those we see in an image. Whether it’s street photography, photojournalism o

Via Anne Leong
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Daniel Kahneman Explains The Machinery of Thought | Farnam Street

Daniel Kahneman Explains The Machinery of Thought | Farnam Street | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Daniel Kahneman dissects the machinery of thought into two agents, system 1 and system two, which respectively produce fast and slow thinking.

Via Philippe Vallat, Alessandro Cerboni
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Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, August 9, 2:07 PM

"One further limitation of System 1 is that it cannot be turned off..." Beside that it's useful...:-)))

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Everything Is a Meme

Everything Is a Meme | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
n the years preceding the financial crisis of 2008, certain key phrases appeared over and again in the public discourse on investing.

One that stands out in my mind is that home prices in the United States haven’t declined nationally since the Great Depression. The phrase appeared in television commentary by pundits, statements by Federal Reserve officials, in analyst reports, and in private conversations with Wall Street analysts.

I discovered the phrase yet again when studying securities ranging from housing stocks like KB Home (KBH), to large international banks like Citigroup (C), to government-sponsored entities like Fannie Mae, to mortgage companies like Countrywide Financial, to insurer and major credit default swap underwriter AIG.

Via Alessandro Cerboni
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Separate neural representations for physical pain and social reject... - PubMed - NCBI

Nat Commun. 2014 Nov 17;5:5380. doi: 10.1038/ncomms6380.
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Neuroscience of Taste: Chef's Creations Delight the Senses

Neuroscience of Taste: Chef's Creations Delight the Senses | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Whether it's a smell that reminds you of your mother's holiday apple pie, or the taste of an oyster that evokes the sights and sounds of the ocean, chef Bryan Voltaggio's cooking aims to transport people to a much-loved place or evoke a fond memory.
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Getting Children Out of Poverty Requires a Two-Generation Approach

Getting Children Out of Poverty Requires a Two-Generation Approach | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
A new strategy is emerging that recognizes the importance of creating opportunity for the entire family, coordinating programs and policies so that parents and children have a chance to succeed -- together....
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Rescooped by Emre Erdogan from Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots
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10 Cities Visualized By How Cleanly Their Streets Are Laid Out

10 Cities Visualized By How Cleanly Their Streets Are Laid Out | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
London's streets run every which way, while Chicago is all north-south right angles. Can you find your city?

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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How Humans Behave -Libertarian paternalism is not an oxymoron


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Social Comparison and Peer effects with Heterogeneous Ability

Abstract: Whether and how the observability of a coworker’s effort influences an employer’s wage decisions and workers’ effort decisions is a central issue for labor organizations. We conduct an experiment using a three-person gift-exchange game to investigate this matter in the context of wage transparency and heterogeneous abilities. We find that showing a coworker’s effort increases both wages and the difference in wages between two heterogeneously skilled workers when the more able worker is observed. The knowledge of a coworker’s effort increases the level of reciprocity exhibited by observed workers (peer effects), whereas it reduces that exhibited by workers who are observers. Overall, displaying coworker’s effort has a beneficial effect on reciprocity. Regardless of their ability, workers exert levels of effort that are positively related to those of their coworkers. This strategic complementarity of efforts is partially explained by inequity aversion.


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Neuroscience Reveals The Deep Power of Human Empathy — PsyBlog

Neuroscience Reveals The Deep Power of Human Empathy — PsyBlog | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Without empathy, human beings are lonely, disconnected creatures.
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Singletary: Picturing our financial behaviors - Dallas Morning News

Singletary: Picturing our financial behaviors - Dallas Morning News | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
The documentary ‘Thinking Money’ provides some of the ‘why’ behind your financial choices.
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The Neuroscience of Bad Habits and Why It’s Not About Will Power - Mindfulness and Psychotherapy

The Neuroscience of Bad Habits and Why It’s Not About Will Power - Mindfulness and Psychotherapy | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
We all have bad habits we want to break, but understanding the brain and mindfulness can give us a leg up.

Via Anne Leong
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David Hain's curator insight, October 9, 1:50 AM

We can re-write patterns that are not helping us!

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, October 10, 12:01 PM

Yesss... I have some too... but you know what? I adore some of them... they are giving the special flavour being me...:-))) or... I don't know... simply I hate that everybody always want to change to somebody else.... Normally I would like to be even more myself... OK, some small things...:-)))

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, November 14, 12:48 PM

I have been watching the recent anti-drug use ads the Canadian government, actually the Conservative Party under the guise of the government, with interest. Do they fall into this conversation?

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Why Your Brain Loves Good Storytelling

Why Your Brain Loves Good Storytelling | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Studying the neuroscience of compelling communication.

Via Anne Leong
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