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Our brains: predictably irrational | TED Playlists | TED

Our brains: predictably irrational | TED Playlists | TED | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
The 3 pounds of jelly in our skulls allow us to reflect on our own consciousness -- and to make counterintuitive, irrational decisions. These talks explore why.
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Don't use your brain, it's totally irrational... Best TED speeches about irrationality

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With My Right Brain
Irrationality is predictable. We need to release "rational man" assumption.
Curated by Emre Erdogan
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Scientists link Selfies to Mental Illness and Narcissism

Scientists link Selfies to Mental Illness and Narcissism | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
The growing trend of taking smartphone selfies is linked to mental health conditions that focus on a person’s obsession with looks.

According to psychiatrist Dr David Veal: “Two out of three of all the patients who come to see me with Body Dysmorphic Disorder since the rise of camera phones have a compulsion to repeatedly take and post selfies on social media sites.”

“Cognitive behavioural therapy is used to help a patient to recognise the reasons for his or her compulsive behaviour and then t
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The Neuroscience of Altruism

The Neuroscience of Altruism | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
In The Altruistic Brain, neurobiologist Donald Pfaff makes the case that humans are hard-wired for good.

Via Anne Leong
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David Hain's curator insight, December 16, 10:23 AM

In The Altruistic Brain, neurobiologist Donald Pfaff makes the case that humans are hard-wired for good. Not sure I agree, nor does the writer.

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The Ulysses Strategy - The New Yorker

The Ulysses Strategy - The New Yorker | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Studies have shown that people can change harmful behavior by committing to be punished if they fail. Can successful businesses be built on this insight?
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Study examines the evolution of responses to (un)fairness - PsyPost

Study examines the evolution of responses to (un)fairness - PsyPost | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
The sense of fairness did not evolve for the sake of fairness per se but in order to reap the benefits of continued cooperation, so say Frans de Waal, PhD, ...
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Why We Kill: Violence as Socialization - YouTube

Acts of serious violence – often committed by seemingly average people – leave us only to ask “Why?” Culture, genetics, and low self-esteem are often cited, but growing evidence points to brutalization experienced in childhood, often at the hands of parents or peers. Ginger Rhodes and Richard Rhodes explore the work of criminologist Lonnie Athens, whose "violentization" model identifies a four-stage process by which almost any human being can be socialized into someone who will assault, rape, or murder. Their talk looks at the history of violence, questions the association of violence with mental illness, tests Athens’ theory on real-life cases, and makes an argument for early intervention.

Richard Rhodes is the author of twenty-five books including The Making of the Atomic Bomb, which won a Pulitzer Prize in Nonfiction, a National Book Award and a National Book Critics Circle Award; Dark Sun: The Making of the Hydrogen Bomb, which was shortlisted for a Pulitzer Prize in History; an investigation of the roots of private violence, Why They Kill; and, most recently, a narrative of the Spanish Civil War, That Fine Place. He has received numerous fellowships for research and writing, including grants from the Ford Foundation, the Guggenheim Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. He has been a visiting scholar at Harvard and MIT and a host and correspondent for documentaries on American public television.

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RSA Animate - The Empathic Civilisation - YouTube

Bestselling author, political adviser and social and ethical prophet Jeremy Rifkin investigates the evolution of empathy and the profound ways that it has sh...
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The Top 4 Lessons in Behavioral Economics From Dilbert

The Top 4 Lessons in Behavioral Economics From Dilbert | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Believe it or not, you can learn a lot from fiction. Some might say that’s because fiction often imitates real life. Of course, that doesn’t necessarily help explain why some of the silliest comic strips have lessons embedded in them.
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Use Behavioral Economics to Achieve Wellness Goals

Use Behavioral Economics to Achieve Wellness Goals | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
What to read next The C-Level Job for Everyone: Reducing Complexity Has the Recession Made Your Life Simpler? Sleep-Deprived People Are More Likely to Cheat Behavioral economics Use Behavioral Economi...
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Bütün anılar kurgudur aslında

Bütün anılar kurgudur aslında | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Psychologist Elizabeth Loftus studies memories. More precisely, she studies false memories, when people either remember things that didn't happen or remember them differently from the way they really were.
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"I Think Therefore I Am" - Who Am I, Then?! | SciTech Connect

"I Think Therefore I Am" - Who Am I, Then?! | SciTech Connect | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Cogito ergo sum – I think, therefore I am. Krishnagopal Dharani uncovers the mind-matter imbroglio in this article.
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Prehistoric conflict hastened human brain's capacity for collaboration, study says | neuroscientistnews.com

Prehistoric conflict hastened human brain's capacity for collaboration, study says | neuroscientistnews.com | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Warfare not only hastened human technological progress and vast social and political changes, but may have greatly contributed to the evolutionary emergence of humans' high intelligence and ability to work together toward common goals, according to...
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Music’s Amazing Effect on Long-Term Memory and Mental Abilities In General

Music’s Amazing Effect on Long-Term Memory and Mental Abilities In General | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
The fascinating effect of music on people’s cognitive abilities.

Professional musicians show superior long-term memory compared with non-musicians, a new study finds.

Their brains are also capable of much faster neural responses in key areas of the brain related to decision-making, memory and attention.

The results were presented at the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting in Washington, DC (Schaeffer et al., 2014).

Professional musicians show superior long-term memory compared with non-musicians, a new study finds.


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Duy Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 10:47 PM

Music is a brain treat 

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How your brain processes failure determines whether you'll succeed in the future

How your brain processes failure determines whether you'll succeed in the future | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
How your brain processes failure determines whether you'll succeed in the future.

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Ziggi Ivan Santini's curator insight, December 10, 2:51 PM

For most people, the only way to success is through failure. Prove to the world that you can deal with it.

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The long reach of reason

The long reach of reason | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Here's a TED first: an animated Socratic dialog! In a time when irrationality seems to rule both politics and culture, has reasoned thinking finally lost its power?
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CONVERSABLE ECONOMIST: Focusing Behavioral Economics on Development Professionals

CONVERSABLE ECONOMIST: Focusing Behavioral Economics on Development Professionals | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
RT @GautamGhosh: Fascinating! Focusing Behavioral Economics on Development Professionals http://t.co/xfYgn22sXy http://t.co/pNB3xIiJL9
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Buddy Profiling: The Latest Big Data Tool

Buddy Profiling: The Latest Big Data Tool | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Our social networks have incredible value in collecting data for business decisions.

Via João Greno Brogueira
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Helen Wybrants's curator insight, December 13, 4:44 AM

the psychological based 'hoarding' factor found in SNs can diminish access to the real data...

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Different Facets of Memory - BrainFacts.org

Different Facets of Memory - BrainFacts.org | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
From remembering a friend's face to figuring out where you left your keys, the act of memory has many dimensions.
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Cognitive Bias: Why Neurotic People Make This Real Estate Choice More - Science 2.0

Cognitive Bias: Why Neurotic People Make This Real Estate Choice More - Science 2.0 | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Phys.Org Cognitive Bias: Why Neurotic People Make This Real Estate Choice More Science 2.0 A paper in the Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics finds that personality traits are strong indicators of real-estate decisions.
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Feeling Unmotivated? It Could Be Your Boss. - Big Think (blog)

Feeling Unmotivated? It Could Be Your Boss. - Big Think (blog) | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
Scientists concluded that forty percent of our motivation to be proactive is derived from our genes and sixty percent is derived from environmental circumstances.
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Real Estate Decisions Reflect Personality - PsychCentral.com (blog)

Real Estate Decisions Reflect Personality - PsychCentral.com (blog) | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
New research suggests personality traits strongly influence real estate choices. For example, if you are conscientious person, a fixed-rate mortgage would fit the bill.
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Empathy Divided against Itself: Hurt by rioting? Tough luck, says the Left; you’re not the real victim here.

Empathy Divided against Itself: Hurt by rioting? Tough luck, says the Left; you’re not the real victim here. | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
“Empathy is at the heart of progressive thought,” according to George Lakoff, the linguist best known for authoring Don’t Think of an Elephant. He argued in 2009 that empathy is “the capacity to care, to feel what others feel, to understand what others are facing and what their lives are like.”Some progressives, however, practice a highly selective form of empathy. Writing for Time magazine after a Missouri grand jury’s decision not to indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of Michael Brown, Darlena Cunha asked, “In such a case, is rioting so wrong?” No, she quickly concluded. Rioting is merely “the legitimate frustration, sorrow, and pain of the marginalized voices . . . spilling out into our streets.” Cunha invoked, as an encouraging precedent, the 1992 Rodney King riots in Los Angeles, never mentioning the 53 people killed during that riot, much less empathizing with them and their families.”By William Voegeli
Via Edwin Rutsch
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Low social status decreases the neural salience of unfairness. - PubMed - NCBI

Front Behav Neurosci. 2014 Nov 20;8:402. eCollection 2014.
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A New Basis in the Brain for Democracy, Law, and Science

A New Basis in the Brain for Democracy, Law, and Science | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it
The diametric mind implies that the path to truth is adversarial.
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Nonconscious activation of placebo and nocebo pain responses

Nonconscious activation of placebo and nocebo pain responses | With My Right Brain | Scoop.it

ABSTRACT

The dominant theories of human placebo effects rely on a notion that consciously perceptible cues, such as verbal information or distinct stimuli in classical conditioning, provide signals that activate placebo effects. However, growing evidence suggest that behavior can be triggered by stimuli presented outside of conscious awareness. Here, we performed two experiments in which the responses to thermal pain stimuli were assessed. The first experiment assessed whether a conditioning paradigm, using clearly visible cues for high and low pain, could induce placebo and nocebo responses. The second experiment, in a separate group of subjects, assessed whether conditioned placebo and nocebo responses could be triggered in response to nonconscious (masked) exposures to the same cues. A total of 40 healthy volunteers (24 female, mean age 23 y) were investigated in a laboratory setting. Participants rated each pain stimulus on a numeric response scale, ranging from 0 = no pain to 100 = worst imaginable pain. Significant placebo and nocebo effects were found in both experiment 1 (using clearly visible stimuli) and experiment 2 (using nonconscious stimuli), indicating that the mechanisms responsible for placebo and nocebo effects can operate without conscious awareness of the triggering cues. This is a unique experimental verification of the influence of nonconscious conditioned stimuli on placebo/nocebo effects and the results challenge the exclusive role of awareness and conscious cognitions in placebo responses.

 

 


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