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How Does iTunes Radio Pay Artists? | Future of Music Coalition

How Does iTunes Radio Pay Artists? | Future of Music Coalition | Wiseband | Scoop.it

For consumers, iTunes Radio may feel a lot like another version of the popular “predictive” radio service Pandora. Plug in an artist or genre, and an algorithm spits out sonically related tracks. But while the experience for listeners may be similar up to a point, the revenue flow behind the scenes is very different.


Via Pierre Priot, Christine Rose Infanger
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Taylor Porter's curator insight, October 14, 2014 9:22 PM

This article is saying how iTunes is unlike other streaming websites when it comes to paying the artists and label. Artist are payed a certain amount but unlike pandora when an artist gives pandora their music, it is uploaded to three platforms so the artist get's a chance to make additional money as well. 

Jason Smith's curator insight, August 22, 2015 5:15 PM

Good article on how artists are getting paid by ITunes Radio

Rusolo No Sleep's curator insight, October 11, 2015 3:32 PM

Apple iTunes Radio helps put money into the artist hands by going deep into apple's pockets. There are two copyrights that brings deals directly to the labels. This the future of how Artist will be paid. The Artist still should invest in CD's. That's the original way of making this purchase smoother. 

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Apple announces iTunes Radio, a streaming music service to compete with Pandora

Apple announces iTunes Radio, a streaming music service to compete with Pandora | Wiseband | Scoop.it
At its WWDC keynote event today, Apple announced iTunes Radio, its long-rumored streaming music service to compete with Pandora, Spotify, Rdio, Xbox Music, Google Play Music All Access, and others....

Via Jérôme Rastoldo, Mediamus
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Lucas Campbell's curator insight, June 11, 2013 12:45 PM

This article comes from a creditable .com site showing the whole article with the name of the author showing as well and has the source used. It talks more about the features of iRadio and how it will work on iOS, Mac, and Apple TV also. 

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Is Apple Screwing the Music Industry?

Is Apple Screwing the Music Industry? | Wiseband | Scoop.it
It appears Apple and Google could be taking the music industry for a ride, underpaying for valuable listening data.

Via Pierre Priot
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Pierre Priot's curator insight, June 6, 2013 4:32 PM

Answer is yes, and the industry cannot wait for getting screwed over by Apple. 

Tyheim's curator insight, August 13, 2013 11:58 AM

I dont think apple is trying to screw the industry but i do believe they are affecting it.

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IRadio is coming, Pandora is running, Spotify is teacher's pet!

IRadio is coming, Pandora is running, Spotify is teacher's pet! | Wiseband | Scoop.it

"Yes, Pandora paid an estimated $275 and $325 million to labels and artists, but the labels argue Pandora chokes off demand for other services that are more profitable for them."


Via Pierre Priot, Hack Your Craft
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Pierre Priot's curator insight, April 1, 2013 12:01 PM

Well, labels will stop fighting when they'll be offered fair deals.

Hack Your Craft's curator insight, April 1, 2013 4:29 PM

Bottomline, Pandora pays less to the record industry's than their darling Spotify. While Pandora is trying to change the law (a bill that went no where) so they can pay less, Spotify pays more by dealing directly with labels as oppose to skirting around them with regulations in US law for web radio. Meanwhile here comes Apple with IRadio which will enter the streaming goldrush having already established a relationship with the labels to with whom the labels see as an industry leader thought Apple is asking to pay the least to labels. But according to the above article diversification and higher royalty rates (paid to labels, not artists) may be what the labels want and let the streaming services duke it out in the end.



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Op-ed: Why the days are numbered for the legacy iPod

Op-ed: Why the days are numbered for the legacy iPod | Wiseband | Scoop.it
The numbers don't lie, but the "when" is anyone's guess.

Via Pierre Priot, Mediamus
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Pierre Priot's curator insight, September 5, 2013 4:22 PM

Smartphones killed the ipod

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Apple Dials in iTunes Radio, a New Streaming Music Service | Gadget Lab | Wired.com

Apple Dials in iTunes Radio, a New Streaming Music Service | Gadget Lab | Wired.com | Wiseband | Scoop.it
Apple has announced a new streaming music service. iTunes Radio. The new station-based radio player launches this fall.

Via Pierre Priot
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Pierre Priot's curator insight, June 10, 2013 3:56 PM

iTunes Radio finally hits the stage blasting Led Zeppelin - Apple are surely evil, but they sure have decent taste.

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With downloads dwindling, music publishers throw a roadblock into Apple's iRadio plans

With downloads dwindling, music publishers throw a roadblock into Apple's iRadio plans | Wiseband | Scoop.it
For years, when it came to driving negotiations with internet music services over licensing, the top record labels were the locomotive and the publishers were the caboose. If the labels licensed...

Via Pierre Priot
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Pierre Priot's curator insight, June 4, 2013 6:22 AM

So basically, music publishers want more money from music streaming, and Apple didn't see that coming?

BOON YUXIN's curator insight, January 19, 2015 4:06 PM

While digital music comes as the majority of the music selling, traditional record label faces some questions like being obsoleted. But this article share the voice of some people who against this situation. When I download more music from the digital retailer, I start to miss the CD sales. This article reminds me to think about the both sides of digital downloading.