Wise Leadership
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Wise Leadership
The characteristics and development of wise leaders.
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Rescooped by Wise Leader™ from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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Storytelling, Empathy, and Generosity: Latest Brain Research

Storytelling, Empathy, and Generosity: Latest Brain Research | Wise Leadership | Scoop.it
Science proves the obvious: If you can put yourself in someone else's shoes, you're more likely to want to help them.

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, April 5, 12:50 PM

Here's a fascinating article exploring the link between empathy and generosity.

 

Now we've know for awhile that storytelling builds empathy between people, and that building storytelling skills means you are building your empathy muscles.

 

What we haven't yet linked through hard neorscience research was the effect of empathy on generosity to others. Now we have that research and the results.

 

Turns out the link is significant. This article shares the research and findings. Frankly, I'm glad I wasn't a test subject (you'll know why when you read the article).

 

As the researchers state, we now know what areas in the brain are involved in empathy and generosity -- and what happens in the brain when people are stingy. 

 

Read the article to find out more. Story on!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

Rescooped by Wise Leader™ from Complex systems and projects
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The Cynefin Framework and emotional intelligence

The Cynefin Framework and emotional intelligence | Wise Leadership | Scoop.it

Via Philippe Vallat
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Philippe Vallat's curator insight, April 29, 2013 7:37 AM

Feedbacks, comments, thoughts, suggestions are welcome!

Rescooped by Wise Leader™ from Mindfulness and Learning
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How Positive Emotions Lead to Better Health

How Positive Emotions Lead to Better Health | Wise Leadership | Scoop.it

New research suggests that meditation or any other mood-enhancing activity can serve as a nutrient for the human body.

 

“Positive emotion, positive social connections, and physical health influence one another in a self-sustaining, upward-spiral dynamic,” concludes a research team led by psychologist Bethany Kok of the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences. It found upbeat emotions inspired by a meditative practice led to greater feelings of connectedness with others, which positively impacted “a biological resource that has been linked to numerous health benefits.”

 

 


Via Pamir Kiciman, Les Howard
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Jared Broker's curator insight, June 19, 2013 5:50 PM

I think as we learn to become quiet and relaxed within, the stress chemicals go away.  Maybe this is us going back to our natural state.