Wise Leadership
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Wise Leadership
The characteristics and development of wise leaders.
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Adapting Change to Fit Complexity

Adapting Change to Fit Complexity | Wise Leadership | Scoop.it

What if decision makers instigating change are seeing the inherent nature of companies all wrong?


Via Philippe Vallat
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Philippe Vallat's curator insight, July 1, 2016 1:10 AM

Excellent post, must read

Philippe Vallat's curator insight, July 1, 2016 1:11 AM

Excellent post, must read

Nadene Canning's curator insight, July 30, 2016 4:12 PM
Adaptive systems thinking (Stacey) applied to illustrate change and complexity
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8 Ways to Stay Calm in the Midst of Chaos

8 Ways to Stay Calm in the Midst of Chaos | Wise Leadership | Scoop.it

Whether you are the chaos creator or just caught in the fray, the best way you can bring sanity back to your team is to be an island of stability. It's harder than it sounds when people are running and screaming with their hair on fire, so here are 8 tips for smooth sailing.


Via The Learning Factor, Jose Luis Anzizar, Bobby Dillard
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 9, 2013 8:20 PM

It's the nature of business to create panic and chaos. Everyone dreams of a company that runs smoothly and efficiently, but ambitious entrepreneurs, managers and salespeople can't help but push for speed. Rather than slow down on a product release or turn down a customer or two until processes are ready, decisions are made that tax resources and send teams into a frenzy.


Whether you are the chaos creator or just caught in the fray, the best way you can bring sanity back to your team is to be an island of stability. It's harder than it sounds when people are running and screaming with their hair on fire, so here are 8 tips for smooth sailing:

Debra Walker's curator insight, September 10, 2013 3:52 PM

It used to be said that the only thing constant is change.  However, these days we can add another - chaos.  As we all experience it, it is good to adopt skills that will help us cope rather than set expectations to eliminate it.  

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Why We're So Afraid of Change ~ What Holds Businesses Back - Forbes

Why We're So Afraid of Change ~ What Holds Businesses Back - Forbes | Wise Leadership | Scoop.it

"Embracing change requires you yourself to experience the changes you’re asking your organization to undergo."

 

Our client is now desperately hoping his division’s leaders will embrace change, maybe even a Blue Ocean Strategy. They’ve reached a dangerous tipping point that could risk the future of their business.

 

____________________

To ignite change, you need to do it yourself first.
____________________ 

 

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN, Bobby Dillard
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 9, 2013 2:52 PM

Any Blue Ocean change practitioners out there who wish to comment on their client experience of "do it yourself first?"  ~  Deb

John Michel's curator insight, April 10, 2013 8:04 AM

In 2009, Steve McKee published “When Growth Stalls” in which he notes that 41.2% of nearly 5,700 companies he studied stalled in the previous decade. The number of reasons why are staggering, namely: a failure to focus, no competitive point of difference, and weak brand images and identities, to name just a few.

Given this reality, we can turn to science to explain why businesses stagnate. Growing research from the neurosciences and cognitive sciences reveal that change really is difficult for humans. Resistance comes from three forces:

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The Science Behind Why Great Stories Spread

The Science Behind Why Great Stories Spread | Wise Leadership | Scoop.it
In the second of a two-part series Jonathan Gottschall discusses the unique power stories have to change minds and the key to their effectiveness.

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 21, 2013 12:50 PM

And so the discussion continues. Jonathan Gottschall writes his second blog post in his series about why/how storytelling works so well for businesses (and in general).


He does a good job in laying that foundation.


I have two thoughts for readers as they check out this post:


1. Gottschalk talks about story structure. Of course you have to know story structures to craft a good story. But structure alone won't make you successful IMHO. There's a whole lot more going on in telling a compelling story and structure is only one piece. Ask any creative writer! There are many different formulas. Most biz folks in the US are completely unaware that different groups/cultures have different story structures than what we see broadcasted on the Internet. Which in a global marketplace has huge significance! I'm not anti-story structure -- I just want us to understand its role better.


2. Stories and manipulation. Yes we are being influenced by stories -- and have always been. Yes we are being manipulated all the time. Yes, at some level we know this. No, access to information via the Internet and social media does not innoculate against this. Which is one reason why consumers are getting much more savvy about purchasing from companies who are socially and environmentally conscious.


Gottschalk focuses mostly on ads in this post. Ads are only one type of business storytelling however. He asks questions at the end, "Is storytelling really locked into a master formula?" No. 


Another question he asks is, "Hasn't the digital revolution paved the way for a new kind of storytelling?" and "Is it time for story 2.0?" LOL -- both remain to be seen and I look forward to the next post!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

John Michel's curator insight, October 22, 2013 5:36 AM

 When we enter into a story, we enter into an altered mental state--a state of high suggestibility.

Charlie Dare's curator insight, October 22, 2013 7:55 PM

Many songs in particular Country or blues ballards tell a story often of love lost like "Me and Bobby Magee "..."

And so the discussion continues. Jonathan Gottschall writes his second blog post in his series about why/how storytelling works so well for businesses (and in general).

 

He does a good job in laying that foundation.

 

I have two thoughts for readers as they check out this post:

 

1. Gottschalk talks about story structure. Of course you have to know story structures to craft a good story. But structure alone won't make you successful IMHO. There's a whole lot more going on in telling a compelling story and structure is only one piece. Ask any creative writer! There are many different formulas. Most biz folks in the US are completely unaware that different groups/cultures have different story structures than what we see broadcasted on the Internet. Which in a global marketplace has huge significance! I'm not anti-story structure -- I just want us to understand its role better.

 

2. Stories and manipulation. Yes we are being influenced by stories -- and have always been. Yes we are being manipulated all the time. Yes, at some level we know this. No, access to information via the Internet and social media does not innoculate against this. Which is one reason why consumers are getting much more savvy about purchasing from companies who are socially and environmentally conscious.

 

Gottschalk focuses mostly on ads in this post. Ads are only one type of business storytelling however. He asks questions at the end, "Is storytelling really locked into a master formula?" No. 

 

Another question he asks is, "Hasn't the digital revolution paved the way for a new kind of storytelling?" and "Is it time for story 2.0?" LOL -- both remain to be seen and I look forward to the next post!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling"

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Why MLK Did NOT Say, "I Have A Plan"--Power of Future Story

Why MLK Did NOT Say, "I Have A Plan"--Power of Future Story | Wise Leadership | Scoop.it
When Martin Luther King, Jr. stood on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial fifty years ago and spoke to a great people about their greater future, he didn’t say, “I have a plan.”

Via Karen Dietz
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romduck's curator insight, August 28, 2013 8:28 AM

Sharing the VISION means sharing the POINT!

Kati Sipp's curator insight, August 29, 2013 8:29 PM

an excellent point. 

Karen Dietz's comment, August 29, 2013 9:44 PM
So true romduck! And thanks for your comments Jean-Philippee and Kati.