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Wisdom 1.0
Assemblage of Substantial Assets Towards Wisdom Version 1.0
Curated by Xaos
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Edmund Carpenter, Marshall McLuhan (eds.): Explorations in Communication: An Anthology (1960) — Monoskop Log

Edmund Carpenter, Marshall McLuhan (eds.): Explorations in Communication: An Anthology (1960) — Monoskop Log | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Writings on art, culture, and media technology
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Ben Woodward: On an Ungrounded Earth: Towards a New Geophilosophy (2013) — Monoskop Log

Ben Woodward: On an Ungrounded Earth: Towards a New Geophilosophy (2013) — Monoskop Log | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Writings on art, culture, and media technology
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monty python football

monty python guyswith their crazy ideas
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" “The Philosophers’ Football Match” (above), a filmed sequence from Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl, pitting the Ancient Greeks against the Germans, with Confucius as referee."

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Of Flies and Philosophers: Wittgenstein and Philosophy

Of Flies and Philosophers: Wittgenstein and Philosophy | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
The idea that philosophy is purely descriptive, and should “leave the world as it is” falls short. It can play a more radical role.
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Dr. Marvin Minsky — Immortal minds are a matter of time

Dr. Marvin Minsky — A.I. Pioneer & Mind Theorist. Professor of Media Arts and Sciences, MIT, Media Lab http://GF2045.com/speakers. Widely recognized as one o...
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Why the mind is not in the head

Why the mind is not in the head | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

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FastTFriend's curator insight, March 4, 2013 5:29 AM

Though written almost 20 years ago, still beautifully put:

 

"Slowly the cards turned into considering that the basis of mind is the body in coupled action, that is, the sensory-motor circuits establish the organism as viable in situated contexts. Form this perspective the brain appears as a dynamical process (and not a syntactic one) of real time variables with a rich self-organizing capacity (and not a representational machinery). So in this sense the mind is not in the head since it is roots in the body as a whole and also in the extended environment where the organism finds itself.
Beyond embodied enaction, recent work with young children and monkeys (1995-) has re-discovered the profound importance of the coupling with other conspecifics. This means that the constitution of a mind is always concurrent with the extended presence of other minds in a network. Thus, beyond embodied enaction there is also generative enaction, a trend that points to the beginnings of a science or interbeing, the future for a proper understanding of the necessary unity of mind and nature."

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The Chomsky-Foucault Debate: complete video recording from 1971

The Chomsky-Foucault Debate: complete video recording from 1971 | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
FOUCAULT: On the other hand, when we discussed the problem of human nature and political problems, then differences arose between us. And contrary to what you think, you can’t prevent me from believ
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video: The Chomsky-Foucault Debate On Human Nature, New York

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The self: The one and only you - 20 February 2013 - New Scientist

The self: The one and only you - 20 February 2013 - New Scientist | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

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FastTFriend's curator insight, February 26, 2013 2:30 AM

Three beliefs about the self are absolutely fundamental for our belief of who we are. First, we regard ourselves as unchanging and continuous. This is not to say that we remain forever the same, but that among all this change there is something that remains constant and that makes the "me" today the same person I was five years ago and will be five years in the future.

Second, we see our self as the unifier that brings it all together. The world presents itself to us as a cacophony of sights, sounds, smells, mental images, recollections and so forth. In the self, these are all integrated and an image of a single, unified world emerges.

Finally, the self is an agent. It is the thinker of our thoughts and the doer of our deeds. It is where the representation of the world, unified into one coherent whole, is used so we can act on this world.

All of these beliefs appear to be blindingly obvious and as certain as can be. But as we look at them more closely, they become less and less self-evident.

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Nassim Taleb and Daniel Kahneman discusses Antifragility at NYPL.mp4

Nassim Taleb and Daniel Kahneman discusses Antifragility at NYPL on Feb 5, 2013 www.pleasemishandle.com/videos/
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“Nothing Good Gets Away”: John Steinbeck Offers Love Advice in a Letter to His Son (1958)

“Nothing Good Gets Away”: John Steinbeck Offers Love Advice in a Letter to His Son (1958) | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Certain readers may turn, for general solace, to the novels of John Steinbeck. But how many, in particular need of romantic advice, open up Of Mice and Men, East of Eden, or The Grapes of Wrath?
Xaos's insight:

"There are several kinds of love. One is a selfish, mean, grasping, egotistical thing which uses love for self-importance. This is the ugly and crippling kind. The other is an outpouring of everything good in you. "

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Algorithms and Control | www.furtherfield.org

Algorithms and Control | www.furtherfield.org | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Xaos's insight:

Algorithms have become a hot topic of political lament in the last few years. The literature is expansive; Christopher Steiner's upcoming book Automate This: How Algorithms Came to Rule Our World attempts to lift the lid on how human agency is largely helpless in the face of precise algorithmic bots that automate the majority of daily life and business.

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FQXi Community

FQXi Community | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
FQXi catalyzes, supports, and disseminates research on questions at the foundations of physics and cosmology, particularly new frontiers and innovative ideas integral to a deep understanding of reality, but unlikely to be supported by conventional...
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Daniel Dennett: 'I don't like theory of mind' – interview

Daniel Dennett: 'I don't like theory of mind' – interview | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
American philosopher Daniel Dennett talks to Carole Jahme about faith, science, empathy – and Short Circuit

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This week American philosopher Daniel Dennett, a long-time stalwart of Darwin@LSE, shared his wisdom with a lunchtime crowd in the London School of Economics' Old Theatre. Since fellow philosopher Helena Cronin's 1995 launch of the LSE hub (which is devoted to evolution's maxims) Dennett has been a regular guest. His mission this week to persuade the public that cultural evolution exists and is facilitated due to our hierarchical nature, where those at the top tell others what to think and do. Dennett rhetorically asked, "Does culture make us smart enough to have minds?"

From studying the human ability to become good at things without understanding, which then leads to our acquisition of the cognisance to comprehend, via our competence, Dennett favours the theory (first suggested by Richard Dawkins) that our social learning has given us a second information highway (in addition to the genetic highway) where the transmission of variant cultural information (memes) takes place via differential replication. Software viruses, for example, can be understood as memes, and as memes evolve in complexity, so does human cognition: "The mind is the effect, not the cause."

Not all philosophers, including Cronin, agree that natural selection shapes culture. But Dennett goes even further, describing a spectrum where, at one end, memes are authorless and free floating and at the opposite end they are guided by forethought, are less Darwinian and more purposeful, such as statistics, computer software and poetry. "Natural selection is not gene centrist and nor is biology all about genes, our comprehending minds are a result of our fast evolving culture. Words are memes that can be spoken and words are the best example of memes. Words have a genealogy and it's easier to trace the evolution of a single word than the evolution of a language."

Because Dennett is an approachable, kind man, once his lecture finished I proposed accompanying him to his lunch appointment and asking a few questions en route. Luckily, he agreed.


Via Wildcat2030
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danijel drnić's curator insight, March 25, 2013 8:15 AM

..i da li je samo jezik slučajno ili namjerno sredstvo kojime se čitav svemir koristi. Jezik, govor, nije samo specifičan za ljude. Komunikacija se odvija na svim nivoima. 

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There Is Only Awe-"There is no such thing as a complete consciousness,”Julian Jaynes

There Is Only Awe-"There is no such thing as a complete consciousness,”Julian Jaynes | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

“There is no such thing as a complete consciousness,” he writes.

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Julian Jaynes, a psychologist at Princeton, had little patience for his colleagues, who spent hours in the lab doing “petty, petty humdrum things.” He dismissed their “objective aridity,” “cunning lingo,” and “valiant nonsense.” The field of psychology, he wrote, was little more than “bad poetry disguised as science.” 

Jaynes published only one book, in 1976, The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind, which tells the story of how mankind learned to think. Critics described it as a bizarre and reckless masterpiece—the American Journal of Psychiatry called Jaynes “as startling as Freud in the Interpretation of Dreams.” Drawing on evidence from neurology, archaeology, art history, theology, and Greek poetry, Jaynes captured the experience of modern consciousness—“a whole kingdom where each of us reigns reclusively alone, questioning what we will, commanding what we can”—as sensitively and tragically as any great novelist. 

 


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Pierre Levy's curator insight, March 17, 2013 1:23 PM

"The origin of consciousness in the bicameral mind" by Julian Jaynes, is a must read!

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Trading without money? Why a new system can address the economic spiral

Trading without money? Why a new system can address the economic spiral | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
From community exchanges to the Swiss WIR, can alternative monetary systems cure our unhealthy addiction to growth, asks Jem Bendell
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Yudkowsky - Three Major Schools

Yudkowsky - Three Major Schools | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Singularity discussions seem to be splitting up into three major schools of thought: Accelerating Change, the Event Horizon, and the Intelligence Explosion.
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Carl Sagan, Stephen Hawking & Arthur C. Clarke Discuss God, the Universe, and Everything Else

Carl Sagan, Stephen Hawking & Arthur C. Clarke Discuss God, the Universe, and Everything Else | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Name the three figures, living or dead, with whom you would most like to sit down to dinner. Though perhaps a little tired, the challenge still reveals something worth knowing about the respondent's personality.
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Was Wittgenstein Right?

Was Wittgenstein Right? | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
The man who insisted that Western philosophy was based in confusion and wishful thinking is not popular among philosophers. But he should not be dismissed.
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The Matrix that Embeds, Maturana and Von Foerster

The third of a series of three 30 minute videos produced by the American Society for Cybernetics and Change Management Systems, directed by Pille Bunnell, 1998.
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'News is to the mind what sugar is to the body'. Towards a Healthy News Diet by Rolf Dobelli

'News is to the mind what sugar is to the body'. Towards a Healthy News Diet by Rolf Dobelli | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Rolf Fobelli: News is to the mind what sugar is to the body
“ “We humans seem to be natural-born signal hunters, we’re terrible at regulating our intake of information. We’ll consume a ton of noise if...

Via Amira
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Amira's curator insight, March 2, 2013 7:45 PM

"Afraid you will miss “something important”? From my experience, if something really important happens, you will hear about it, even if you live in a cocoon that protects you from the news. Friends and colleagues will tell you about relevant events far more reliably than any news organization. They will fill you in with the added benefit of meta-information, since they know your priorities and you know how they think. You will learn far more about really important events and societal shifts by reading about them in specialized journals, in-depth magazines or good books and by talking to the people who know. (…)

The more “news factoids” you digest, the less of the big picture you will understand. (…)

Thinking requires concentration. Concentration requires uninterrupted time. News items are like free-floating radicals that interfere with clear thinking. News pieces are specifically engineered to interrupt you. They are like viruses that steal attention for their own purposes. (…) [F]ewer than 10% of the news stories are original. Less than 1% are truly investigative. And only once every 50 years do journalists uncover a Watergate.  (...) The copying and the copying of the copies multiply the flaws in the stories and their irrelevance."

“When people struggle to describe the state that the Internet puts them in they arrive at a remarkably familiar picture of disassociation and fragmentation. Life was once whole, continuous, stable; now it is fragmented, multi-part, shimmering around us, unstable and impossible to fix. The world becomes Keats’s “waking dream,” as the writer Kevin Kelly puts it.” — Adam Gopnik

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Heinz von Foerster - Autopoiesis

High Tech Heroes with Sherwin Gooch, episode number 10, part 1, directed by Hud Nordin: Cybenetician Heinz von Foerster discusses the founding of Cybernetics...

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OVERVIEW

The trailer for our feature film CONTINUUM is now online: https://vimeo.com/60234866 PLUS... We've just launched our Kickstarter campaign! Come and support us,…
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Eric Schwitzgebel: Black and, Err, White | berfrois

Eric Schwitzgebel: Black and, Err, White | berfrois | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Many philosophers consider the era of “modern” philosophy to begin with René Descartes’s Discourse on Method (1637) and Meditations on First Philosophy (1641). In these works, Descartes aims to ground human knowledge of the external, material world.
Xaos's insight:

I argue; we err systematically and pervasively about even the most basic facts of the stream of experience, and even when we set our minds to it carefully and conscientiously. Our knowledge of our immediate physical environment is much better than our knowledge of our stream of experience, and in fact to a large extent our knowledge of our physical environment is the ground of whatever knowledge we do manage to cobble together about our stream of experience.

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The Half-Life Of Facts: Sam Arbesman at TEDxKC

Facts change all the time. Smoking has gone from doctor-recommended to deadly. We used to think Earth was the center of the universe and that Pluto was a pla...
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