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Wisdom 1.0
Assemblage of Substantial Assets Towards Wisdom Version 1.0
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Devourer of Encyclopedias: Stanislaw Lem's "Summa Technologiae" -

Devourer of Encyclopedias: Stanislaw Lem's "Summa Technologiae" - | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
AT LAST WE have it in English. Summa Technologiae, originally published in Polish in 1964, is the cornerstone of Stanislaw Lem’s oeuvre, his consummate work of speculative nonfiction. Trained in medicine and biology, Lem synthesizes the current science of the day … Continue reading →
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▶ The Intersection of Neuroscience and Philosophy - On Our Mind - YouTube

(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) Is there a science of the soul? Does how we think about the brain define how we think about ourselves? Patricia Churchland, B. P...
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▶ Seven Complex Lessons in Education - Edgar Morin - Interview - YouTube

Dr. Edgar Morin, an eminent sociologist and philosopher, discusses his work on Seven Complex Lessons in Education for the Future, addressing themes related t...
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Where is the proof in pseudoscience?

Where is the proof in pseudoscience? | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
The word “pseudoscience” is used to describe something that is portrayed as scientific but fails to meet scientific criteria. This misrepresentation occurs because actual science has creditability (which…
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Walter Benjamin: Selected Writings, Volume 1: 1913–1926 (1996) — Monoskop Log

Walter Benjamin: Selected Writings, Volume 1: 1913–1926 (1996) — Monoskop Log | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
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The role of chance in evolution – Lewis Spurgin – Aeon

The role of chance in evolution – Lewis Spurgin – Aeon | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
The strange biology of island populations highlights the role of chance, as well as selection, in evolutionary change

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Brian Rotman: Becoming Beside Ourselves: The Alphabet, Ghosts, and Distributed Human Being (2008) — Monoskop Log

Brian Rotman: Becoming Beside Ourselves: The Alphabet, Ghosts, and Distributed Human Being (2008) — Monoskop Log | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
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Bruno Latour: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns (2012/2013) — Monoskop Log

Bruno Latour: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns (2012/2013) — Monoskop Log | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
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Anthony Quinton on Ludwig Wittgenstein: Section 4

Bryan Magee talks with Anthony Quinton about the two incommensurable views of Wittgenstein: his logical view of language and his somewhat pragmatic view of l...
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Lab-grown meat demands a new food ethics – Julian Baggini – Aeon

Lab-grown meat demands a new food ethics – Julian Baggini – Aeon | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
It's made in a lab, no factory farms and no killing, but it's still meat. Looks like we'll need a whole new food ethics
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Anthony Quinton on Ludwig Wittgenstein: Section 2

Bryan Magee talks with Anthony Quinton about the two incommensurable views of Wittgenstein: his logical view of language and his somewhat pragmatic view of l...

Via FastTFriend
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FastTFriend's comment, August 31, 2013 5:14 AM
delightful allusions (well, in this reader's mind) to China Mieville's Embassytown
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How Scholars Hack the World of Academic Publishing Now

How Scholars Hack the World of Academic Publishing Now | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
You can form a cartel. Or you can ignore it all together.

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If you want to understand the modern academy, it wouldn’t hurt to start at “impact factor.”

Every year, the company Thomson Reuters assigns every academic journal an “impact factor.” Impact factors measure, roughly, how often papers published in one journal are cited by other journals. It is an ecological measurement, in other words. You’d recognize the names of journals with the highest impact factors — Nature, Science, etc. — but the world of scholarly journals is enormous, and there’s crowding at the bottom.

Two stories today illustrate the problems with impact factors, and the difficulty of measuring knowledge through any metric.

First, Nature News revealed that a Brazilian citation cartel had been outed by Thomson Reuters. That’s right: a citation cartel.

The Brazilian government measures graduate schools based on the impact factor of the journals that those schools’ students publish in. Brazilian journals, many of which are newer, have low impact factors, so Brazilian graduate students often publish in journals abroad. This makes them and their graduate program look better, but it means the commercial benefit of Brazilian scholarship flows, in part, to non-Brazilian companies.

So editors at a set of Brazilian journals began linking to each others’ journals... a lot. The flurry of cross-citation made every journal appear more influential, and succeeded in raising the journals’ impact factor in 2011. For a moment, the scheme worked.

Until it didn’t.


Via Wildcat2030
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Karen Pearlman's comment, September 7, 2013 11:23 PM
The implication here is that applying economic rationalization to research culture seems to lead directly to a) corruption; b)meaningless research activity; c) strife filled worlds for academic researchers whereby value is measured against criteria external to the research concerns; and d) probably lower standards of teaching since this research outputs have more "value" for academic's careers.
Christos Nikolaou's comment, September 8, 2013 4:10 AM
sounds unfortunately true...
Pedro Tavares's curator insight, September 13, 2013 8:59 AM

no coments ....

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Is Buddhism the Most Science-Friendly Religion? | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network

Is Buddhism the Most Science-Friendly Religion? | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Here is some sad news, courtesy of the Pew Research Center’s “Religion & Public Life Project.” Not only is there a growing gap between Democrats and ...
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Sharing Entanglement without Sending It

Sharing Entanglement without Sending It | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Three new experiments demonstrate how entanglement can be shared between distant parties without the need of an entangled carrier.
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Introduction to Complex Systems: Patterns in Nature

This video provides a basic introduction to the science of complex systems, focusing on patterns in nature. (For more information on agent-based modeling, visit http://imaginationtoolbox.org ).


Via Lorien Pratt, Complexity Digest
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António F Fonseca's curator insight, February 1, 2014 4:50 AM

Agent based modeling still is the best tool to understand complex systems when mathematical modeling gets very complicated.

Liz Rykert's curator insight, February 10, 2014 7:25 PM

Always looking for good resources to introduce complexity science to others. This looks great. 

Ian Biggs, MAIPM, CPPE's curator insight, April 16, 2014 8:08 PM

I recently conducted a series of workshops on the subject of 'Complex Project Management - Navigating through the unknown'. This clip provides a great introduction to complex systems and for those interested in Complexity Science, this clip is worth 7:52 of your time.

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Stop What You’re Doing and Look at These Funnies :: Critical-Theory.com

Stop What You’re Doing and Look at These Funnies :: Critical-Theory.com | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Critical theory jokes.
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Why it's time to lay the selfish gene to rest – David Dobbs – Aeon

Why it's time to lay the selfish gene to rest – David Dobbs – Aeon | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
The selfish gene is one of the most successful science metaphors ever invented. Unfortunately it’s wrong

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Why You Aren't as Creative as You'd Like to Think - Wired Science

Why You Aren't as Creative as You'd Like to Think - Wired Science | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
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Mlik Sahib's curator insight, November 18, 2013 12:03 AM

So how does this mode of innovation hold up in the 21st century? Pagel offers both pessimism and hope. On the downside, the ease of information access endangers our critical reasoning: “If we think Google will do our thinking for us,” he warned, “the internet might make us stupid.” On the other hand, globalization and our unprecedented connectedness may prepare us well to conquer global challenges like resource scarcity, poverty, and climate change. “The world is connected in a way that it’s never been connected before,” said Pagel, “so the collective mind is primed in a way it’s never been before.”

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Judy Wajcman: Feminism Confronts Technology (1991) — Monoskop Log

Judy Wajcman: Feminism Confronts Technology (1991) — Monoskop Log | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
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Peter Sloterdijk: You Must Change Your Life: On Anthropotechnics (2009/2012) — Monoskop Log

Peter Sloterdijk: You Must Change Your Life: On Anthropotechnics (2009/2012) — Monoskop Log | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
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‘The Character of Physical Law’: Richard Feynman’s Legendary Lecture Series at Cornell, 1964

‘The Character of Physical Law’: Richard Feynman’s Legendary Lecture Series at Cornell, 1964 | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Lecture One, The Law of Gravitation: Feynman ended the first of his famous 1964 Messenger Lectures at Cornell University, a talk entitled 'The Law of Gravitation, an Example of Physical Law.' (See above.) The lectures were intended by Feynman as...
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