Wisdom 1.0
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Wisdom 1.0
Assemblage of Substantial Assets Towards Wisdom Version 1.0
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Chance Conversations: An Interview with Merce Cunningham and John Cage

In the spring of 1981, during a residency at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota, choreographer Merce Cunningham and composer John Cage sat down to discuss their work and artistic process. As frequent collaborators, Cage and Cunningham pioneered a new framework of performance. Their novel approach allowed for mediums to exist independently, or rather cohabitate, within a performance, thus abandoning the co-dependent model of dance and music. Cage and Cunningham go on to discuss the methodology and motivations behind chance operations, a term used to describe artistic decisions based on unpredictability. Wanting to free himself of his likes and dislikes, Cage describes how Zen Buddhism influenced his work, leading him to use tools of chance. These new methods, adopted by both Cunningham and Cage, overturned a whole foundation of thought around music, movement, and the process of creating art.

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Bertrand Russell - Face to Face Interview (BBC, 1959)

Bertrand Russell (1872 -- 1970) was a British philosopher, logician, mathematician, historian, and social critic. At various points in his life he considered himself a liberal, a socialist, and a pacifist, but he also admitted that he had never been any of these in any profound sense. He was born in Monmouthshire, into one of the most prominent aristocratic families in Britain

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Evolution Created Free Will | Daniel Dennett | Big Think

For billions of years on this planet, there was life but no free will. The difference is not in physics—which has remained the same—but is ultimately in biology, specifically evolutionary biology.
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The Last Question - By Isaac Asimov

The Last Question - By Isaac Asimov | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

saac Asimov was the most prolific science fiction author of all time. In fifty years he averaged a new magazine article, short story, or book every two weeks, and most of that on a manual typewriter. Asimov thought that The Last Question, first copyrighted in 1956, was his best short story ever. Even if you do not have the background in science to be familiar with all of the concepts presented here, the ending packs more impact than any other book that I've ever read. Don't read the end of the story first!

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New Money for a New World 7/19 - interview with Bernard Lietaer

New Money for a New World - interview with Bernard Lietaer - part 7 of 19 Continues at: http://vimeo.com/44763319 New Money for a New World examines a previously unexamined culprit for the many issues we face today—the monopoly of our centuries old monetary system. This book also provides many ways and means that are now readily available to stop the current juggernaut towards global self destruction.

Many of the solutions offered within this book are more than theory. Communities from around the world have successfully addressed a myriad of issues without the need to raise taxes, redistribute wealth, or depend upon enlightened self interest from corporate entities. Rather the improvements were realized simply and effectively by rethinking money. With such a shift everything is possible.

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Jane McGonigal: The game that can give you 10 extra years of life | Video on TED.com

TED Talks When game designer Jane McGonigal found herself bedridden and suicidal following a severe concussion, she had a fascinating idea for how to get better. She dove into the scientific research and created the healing game, SuperBetter.
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Graphing the history of philosophy

Graphing the history of philosophy | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

Each philosopher is a node in the network and the lines between them (or edges in the terminology of graph theory) represents lines of influence. The node and text are sized according to the number of connections. The algorithm that visualises the graph also tends to put the better connected nodes in the centre of the diagram so we the most influential philosophers, in large text, clustered in the centre. It all seems about right with the major figures in the western philosophical tradition taking the centre stage. (I need to also add the direction of influence with a arrow head – something I’ve not got round to yet.) A shortcoming however is that this evaluation only takes into account direct lines of influence. Indirect influence via another person in the network does not enter into it. This probably explains why Descartes is smaller than you’d think.

It gets more interesting when we use Gephi to identify communities (or modules) within the network. Roughly speaking it identifies groups of nodes which are more connected with each other than with nodes in other groups. Philosophy has many traditions and schools so a good test would be whether the algorithm picks them out.

It has been fairly successful. Below we can see the so called continental tradition picked out in green, stemming from Hegel and Nietzsche, leading into Heidegger and Sartre and ending in the isms of the twentieth century. It’s interesting that there is separate subgroup, in purple, influenced mainly by Schopenhauer (out of shot) and Freud.

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Michael Sandel: The lost art of democratic debate | Video on TED.com

Michael Sandel: The lost art of democratic debate | Video on TED.com | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

Michael Sandel teaches political philosophy at Harvard. His book "Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do?" explores some of the most hotly contested moral and political issues of our time.

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Albert Einstein- How I See the World

Albert Einstein is considered one of the greatest scientific thinkers of all time. His theories on the nature of time and space profoundly affected the human conception of the physical world and set the foundations for many of the scientific advances of the twentieth century. As a thinker on the human condition, politics, and all issues of the day, he was as well-respected as anyone in his time.

Born in Ulm, Germany in 1879, Einstein was brought up in Munich. His parents were of Jewish German ancestry, and his father ran an electrical equipment plant. He did not speak fluently until after he was nine and was considered slow. Though his grades were fair in high school, he was eventually expelled for his rebellious nature. Always an individual, he traveled around before re-enrolling and completing school in his new home in Zurich, Switzerland.

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Ingmar Bergman - Interview (1/6)

a Swedish director, writer and producer for film, stage and television. Described by Woody Allen as "probably the greatest film artist, all things considered, since the invention of the motion picture camera," he is recognized as one of the most accomplished and influential film directors of all time.[3]He directed over sixty films and documentaries for cinematic release and for television, most of which he also wrote. He also directed over one hundred and seventy plays. Among his company of actors were Harriet Andersson, Liv Ullmann, Gunnar Björnstrand, Bibi Andersson, Erland Josephson, Ingrid Thulin and Max von Sydow. Most of his films were set in the landscape of Sweden. His major subjects were death, illness, faith, betrayal, and insanity.

Bergman was active for more than six decades. In 1976 his career was seriously threatened as the result of a botched criminal investigation for alleged income tax evasion. Outraged, Bergman suspended a number of pending productions, closed his studios, and went into self-imposed exile in Germany for eight years.

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Kurt Godel: The World's Most Incredible Mind (Part 1 of 3)

Kurt Godel: The World's Most Incredible Mind.

"Either mathematics is too big for the human mind or the human mind is more than a machine" ~ Godel

Kurt Godel (1931) proved two important things about any axiomatic system rich enough to include all of number theory.

1) You'll never be able to prove every true result..... you'll never be able to prove every result that is true in your system.

2) Godel also proved that one of the results that you can never prove is the result that says that the system is consistent. More precisely: You cannot prove the consistency of any mathematical system rich enough to include the known theory of numbers.

Hence, any consistent mathematical system that is rich enough to include number theory is inherently incomplete.

Second, one of the propositions whose truth or falsity cannot be proved within the system is precisely the proposition that states that the system is consistent. "

What Godel's proof means, then, is that we can't prove that arithmetic—let alone any more-complicated system—is consistent.

For 2000 years, mathematics has been the model—the subject—that convinces us that certainty is possible. Yet Now there's no certainty anywhere—not even in mathematics.

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The power of Networkds via K21ST

The power of Networkds via K21ST | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

In this new RSA Animate, Manuel Lima, senior UX design lead at Microsoft Bing, explores the power of network visualisation to help navigate our complex modern world. Taken from a lecture given by Manuel Lima as part of the RSA's free public events programme. Listen to the full talk: http://www.thersa.org/events/audio-and-past-events/2011/the-power-of-networks...

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John Cage Performs Water Walk on “I’ve Got a Secret” (1960)

John Cage Performs Water Walk on “I’ve Got a Secret” (1960) | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
In 1952, John Cage composed his most controversial piece, 4′33,″ a four-and-a-half minute reflection on the sound of silence. Now fast forward eight years.It’s February, 1960, and we find the composer teaching his famous Experimental Composition courses at The New School in NYC, and paying a visit to the CBS game show “I’ve Got a Secret.” The TV show offered Cage something of a teachable moment, a chance to introduce the broader public to his brand of avant-garde music. Cage’s piece is called Water Walk (1959), and it’s all performed with unconventional instruments, save a grand piano. A water pitcher, iron pipe, goose call, bathtub, rubber duckie, and five unplugged radios — they all make the music. And the audience doesn’t quite know how to react, except with nervous laughter. It wasn’t particularly courteous. But, as one scholar has noted, it’s equally remarkable that prime time TV gave ten minutes of uninterrupted airtime to avant-garde music. You take the good with the bad.
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Infinite Worlds: A Journey through Parallel Universes

Infinite Worlds: A Journey through Parallel Universes | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

The multiverse hypothesis, suggesting that our universe is but one of perhaps infinitely many, speaks to the very nature of reality. Physicist Brian Greene, cosmologists Alan Guth and Andrei Linde, and philosopher Nick Bostrom discuss and debate this controversial implication of forefront research and explore its potential for redefining the cosmic order. Moderated by Robert Krulwich and featuring an original musical interlude, inspired by parallel worlds, by DJ Spooky.

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Stress: Portrait of a Killer - via K21ST - Essential 21ST Century knowledge

Stress: Portrait of a Killer - via K21ST - Essential 21ST Century knowledge | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

National Geographic Documentary. Over the last three decades, science has been advancing our understanding of stress—how it impacts our bodies and how our social standing can make us more or less susceptible. From baboon troops on the plains of Africa, to neuroscience labs at Stanford University, scientists are revealing just how lethal stress can be. Research tells us that the impact of stress can be found deep within us, shrinking our brains, adding fat to our bellies, even unraveling our chromosomes. Understanding how stress works can help us figure out ways to combat it and how to live a life free of the tyranny of this contemporary plague.

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Slavoj Zizek - First as Tragedy, Then as Farce

Slavoj Zizek - First as Tragedy, Then as Farce | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Slavoj Zizek, one of the worlds most influential living philosophers discusses capitalism's flawed priorities.He wants to develop a very simple linear line of thought about one point: Why in our economy charity is no longer classed as an idiosyncrasy of some good guys, here and there, but basic constituent of our economy.

He starts with the so called feature of the today’s cultural capitalism and how the same thing applies to the economy in the narrower sense of the term.

Namely if in the old times, precisely before the transformations of capitalism into more cultural, post-modern, and carrying for ecology, there was a simple opposition between the consummation and speculation and what you actually do for the society.

For example, George Soros (an old school capitalist) in the morning grabs the money, and in the afternoon he gives the half of the money back to charities. In the modern capitalism there is a tendency to bring those two dimensions together, in one and same gesture.

Today when you buy something, your anti-consumerism duty to do something for the environment and the people is already included into it. An example would be Starbucks. When you buy a coffee they will explicitly tell you: It’s not just what are you buying, it’s what are you buying into.
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Mariana Soffer's comment, July 25, 2012 5:28 AM
I used to read this guy long time ago, thanks for bringing it back
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Platonic Ignorance By Massimo Pigliucci

Platonic Ignorance By Massimo Pigliucci | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

Plato famously maintained that knowledge is “justified true belief,” meaning that to claim the status of knowledge our beliefs (say, that the earth goes around the sun, rather than the other way around) have to be both true (to the extent this can actually be ascertained) and justified (i.e., we ought to be able to explain to others why we hold such beliefs, otherwise we are simply repeating the — possibly true — beliefs of someone else).*

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Artist sabine gross

Artist sabine gross | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

n her art, Sabine Groß addresses outstanding works of art history. The initiate will find in her pieces references to established positions such as Carl Andre, Marcel Duchamp, Donald Judd or Constantin Brançusi. Her oeuvre focuses not on imitation, but on a fundamental approach to works that have by dint of art history been raised to the status of icons. Here, a memory of materials and surfaces, as well as our perception of what we actually see, play an important role. Sabine Groß seeks with her art to question and comment on art history.I

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Professor Hubert Dreyfus- Heidegger and Foucault on the Subject, Agency and Practices

Professor Hubert Dreyfus- Heidegger and Foucault on the Subject, Agency and Practices | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

Whatever their similarities and differences, one thing that Heidegger and Foucault clearly have in common is that both are critical of the Cartesian idea of a self-transparent subject and the related Kantian ideal of autonomous agency. Yet neither denies the importance of human freedom.

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Sartre: The Road to Freedom/documentary

Sartre: The Road to Freedom/documentary | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

o be told, you are responsible for the period of history that you are living in. You have not only the right to choose, but the duty to choose and if you are now surrounded by poverty, by war, by oppression, by cruelty – that is what you have chosen.Sartre was the leading advocate of atheistic existentialism in France but he was also interested in the novel, drama, literary criticism and politics.He is best remembered for his philosophical works and his idea of communistic existentialism which he expressed in novels and plays such as his debut novel Nausea (1939), which depicted man adrift in a godless universe, hostage to his own freedom. He had a long term affair with the feminist philosopher, Simone de Beauvoir, and together they were at the center of French intellectual life from the late 1920s onwards. His great philosophical work is Being and Nothingness (1956). Like Kierkegaard and Heidegger, Sartre emphasized the burden of individual personal freedom: that although we can’t escape the fact of our situation, we are free to change it. He drew a distinction between the unconscious and the conscious.

After the Second World War, during which he fought for the Resistance, he became increasingly interested in Marxism and his involvement with the French Communist party was part of his desire to overcome the economic and social “structures of choice” which he found restricting. His main contribution to Marxism is Critique of Dialectical Reason (1960). Sartre refused the 1964 Nobel Prize in literature on “personal grounds”, but is later said to have accepted it

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Ray Bradbury on Space, Education, and Our Obligation to Future Generations: A Rare 2003 Interview

Ray Bradbury on Space, Education, and Our Obligation to Future Generations: A Rare 2003 Interview | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

If you don’t read or write, you can’t be educated, you can’t care about anything — you’ve gotta put something in people’s heads so the metaphors bounce around and collide with each other and make new metaphors. That’s the success I’ve had of daring to put different metaphors together, mashing their heads together, saying, ‘Oh my god, I didn’t think of that — how wonderful!’

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What Mark Rothko thinks - the video is from "The Power of Art - Mark Rothko" by BBC.

"When I was a younger man, art was a lonely thing. No galleries, no collectors, no critics, no money. Yet, it was an golden age, for we all had nothing to lose, and the vision, the gain. Today is not quite the same. It is a time of tons of verbiage, activity, consumption. Which condition is better for the world at large I will not venture to discuss. But I do know that many of those who were driven to this life are desperately searching for those pockets of silence where we can root and grow. We must all hope we find them.

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Christopher Alexander Lecture at Berkeley, California

Dr. Alexander is the author of numerous books and papers. He has initiated a new approach to architectural thinking, in which the same set of laws determines the structure of a city; a building; or a single room. He has spent most of his life in searching for these laws. His approach to solving this universal problem takes advantage of scientific reasoning, and totally opposes other, unscientific approaches based on fashion, ideology, or arbitrary personal preferences. This is so different from the way architecture has been taught since the second world war that it causes conflicts with established architectural schools.

Alexander offers definitive solutions to the problems of urban architecture and design. It is a great pity that these were not adopted when first published. Fortunately, a small number of his ideas have been incorporated into the "New Urbanism". Nevertheless, this very recent movement by no means represents a wholesale application of his results. Alexander has actually abstracted the process by which organic and inorganic forms evolve -- which is the same process that governs the growth of a city. These results lie at the basis of how matter organizes itself coherently, and are the opposite of the modern planning approach in which grids, zones, roads, and buildings, based on some preconceived design on paper, are imposed on human activity. These results will be expounded at length in the four-volume The Nature of Order [see Alexander's Nature of Order webpage].

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