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Assemblage of Substantial Assets Towards Wisdom Version 1.0
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Physics for the 21st Century

Physics for the 21st Century | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
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Welcome to Physics for the 21st Century: an on-line course that explores the frontiers of physics. The 11 units, accompanied by videos, interactive simulations, and a comprehensive Facilitator's Guide, work together to present an overview of key areas of rapidly-advancing knowledge in the field, arranged from the sub-atomic scale to the cosmological. The goal is to make the frontiers of physics accessible to anyone with an inquisitive mind who wants to experience the excitement, probe the mystery, and understand the human aspects of modern physics.

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Making in the classroom:

Making in the classroom: | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Joshua Glenn and Elizabeth Foy Larsen, editors of the fantastic kids' activity book Unbored have an article in the Huffington Post about the power of making in the classroom.
Xaos's insight:

n fact, the idea of "learning by doing" stretches back to education legends Maria Montessori and John Dewey, both of whom felt teachers should act more as guides to students' independent discoveries than as founts of information. Decades of research confirm that making and doing things cement knowledge in ways that lectures can't. "Think about the driver and the passenger in a car," says Adele Diamond, Ph.D., a professor of psychiatry at the University of British Columbia and one of the founders of the field of developmental cognitive neuroscience. "The driver is hands-on and the passenger does what students normally do in class, which is sit passively. The driver will learn the route better because she has to actively use the information."

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A 10 Minutes Introduction to Embodied Cognition | Ricardo A. Tellez

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What is cognition? 

Basically, it is a group of mental processes. Cognition requires: Perception Attention Anticipation Reasoning Learning Inner Speech Imagination Memory Emotions Planning Pain and Pleasure

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Nietzsche Contra Socrates

Nietzsche Contra Socrates | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Friedrich Nietzsche was by all accounts an admirer of the Hellenic aesthetic tradition, and would often refer to the ancient myths and tragedies to frame his own philosophy.  In the philosopher’s f...
Xaos's insight:

riedrich Nietzsche was by all accounts an admirer of the Hellenic aesthetic tradition, and would often refer to the ancient myths and tragedies to frame his own philosophy.  In the philosopher’s first—and self-admittedly flawed—book, The Birth of Tragedy (1872), Nietzsche presents his views on the development of the ancient Greek dramas, characterizing its growth as an artistic desire to thwart the emergence of pessimism in human expression.[1]  He framed this artistic development in terms of the philosophical dichotomy of the Apollonian and Dionysian elements.  Much can be written (and has been written) about these two elements as literary concepts, but the simplified idea is that there exists a delicate balance between the human striving for orderliness (the Apollonian element) in light of our innate attraction to chaotic irrationalities (the Dionysian element), in which the two sides are contingent on one another to create an essential harmony of human expression.[2]  Nietzsche considered the ancient Athenian dramas of Aeschylus and Sophocles to be the epitome of this dynamic in aesthetic form; i.e. their works signal the birth of tragedy, in human art.[3]  To Nietzsche this development was the zenith of artistic creation, a perfect balance between opposing drives of the human instinct, whose blending satisfied the artist in man as a whole.  Since this time in antiquity, however, we have experienced a decline—a devolution—in the aesthetic development of man.  A loss that Nietzsche traces to one fundamental source: Socrates.

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Understanding Is A Poor Substitute For Convexity (antifragility) | Conversation | Edge

Understanding Is A Poor Substitute For Convexity (antifragility) | Conversation | Edge | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Xaos's insight:

Something central, very central, is missing in historical accounts of scientific and technological discovery. The discourse and controversies focus on the role of luck as opposed to teleological programs (from telos, "aim"), that is, ones that rely on pre-set direction from formal science. This is a faux-debate: luck cannot lead to formal research policies; one cannot systematize, formalize, and program randomness. The driver is neither luck nor direction, but must be in the asymmetry (or convexity) of payoffs, a simple mathematical property that has lied hidden from the discourse, and the understanding of which can lead to precise research principles and protocols.

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Hallucinations with Oliver Sacks

In the first installment of the World Science Festival's new series, Science & Story, famed neurologist Oliver Sacks joined award-winning journalist John Hocken
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Einstein Documentary Offers A Revealing Portrait of the Great 20th Century Scientist

Einstein Documentary Offers A Revealing Portrait of the Great 20th Century Scientist | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Albert Einstein is the patron saint of slackers redeemed. We’ve all heard some version of his late-bloomer story: “You know, Albert Einstein did terribly in high school” (says every high school guidance counselor at some point).
Xaos's insight:

The above 2006 profile of Einstein by PBS’s “American Masters” documentary series, Albert Einstein: How I See the World, takes the opposite tack, surrounding him with the aura of a hero in a Hermann Hesse novel. The film begins with William Hurt’s narration of Einstein’s solo trek through the Alps at twenty-two, during which he “longed to grasp the hidden design, the underlying principles of nature.” Over the intrigue conjured by Michael Galasso’shaunting, minimalist score and a montage of black-and-white nature films, narrator Hurt intones:

Every once in a while there comes a man who is able to see the universe in a totally new way, whose vision upsets the very foundations of the world as we know it. Throughout his life, Albert Einstein would look for this harmony, not only in his science, but in the world of men. The world wanted to know Albert Einstein, yet he remained a mystery to those who only saw his public face and perhaps to himself as well. “What does a fish know of the water in which he swims?” he asked himself.

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Poiēsis and technē in Foucault and Heidegger: Towards an Aesthetics of Free Being

Poiēsis and technē in Foucault and Heidegger: Towards an Aesthetics of Free Being | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
"Foucault’s writings in Discipline and Punish, The History of Sexuality and later essays, lectures and interviews suggests a way of understanding power – power not simply in terms of the production of bodies and behaviours, but power as a finite...

Via Anna Valentina Farina, Wildcat2030
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Alan Watts Brings Eastern Wisdom to American TV Viewers in 1959 (Complete Episodes)

Alan Watts Brings Eastern Wisdom to American TV Viewers in 1959 (Complete Episodes) | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

Nearly forty years after his death, the words of Alan Watts still generate excitement. Fans trade them, in the form of texts, radio broadcasts, recorded talks, and television programs, both online and off. The British-born interpreter and popularizer of East Asian Buddhist thought generated most of his media in the San Francisco of the 1950s and 1960s, and his televised lectures, produced for local public station KQED, must have offered many a San Franciscan their very first glimpse of Zen. Now that episodes of his series Eastern Wisdom and Modern Life have made it to YouTube (season one, season two), you can see for yourself that Watts’ then-cutting-edge delivery of this ancient wisdom remains entertaining, informative, and striking in its clarity. Begin with the introductory episode above, “Man and Nature,” in which Watts calmly lays out his observations of the ill effects of Westerners’ having grown to distrust their human instincts.

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philosophy bites: What is Philosophy?

philosophy bites: What is Philosophy? | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
We asked a range of Philosophy Bites interviewees the simple question 'What is Philosophy?'...Here are some of their answers: Listen to What is Philosophy? The Philosophy Bites podcast is made in association with the Institute of Philosophy.
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The Generation of Form in A New Kind of Science

The Generation of Form in A New Kind of Science | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

how does anything complicated get produced in nature? I mean, when we look at the natural world, it's full of complex forms and complex behavior. It's not just circles and squares and repetitive motion. But where does all this complexity come from? What's its fundamental origin?Well, if one wants to ask a fundamental question like that about nature, it's been sort of a defining feature of the exact sciences for perhaps 300 years that one should use mathematics and mathematical equations. Because, to use Galileo's words, the book of nature "is written in the language of mathematics."

Well, that's an idea that really transformed science 300 years ago. And it certainly worked well for Newton and friends in figuring out the orbits of comets--and for lots and lots of things since then.

But somehow for the more complex things one sees in nature, it's never worked out very well. And what I think is that really one needs a new paradigm--a new kind of science.

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Jonas Eliasson: How to solve traffic jams | Video on TED.com

TED Talks It’s an unfortunate reality in nearly every major city—road congestion, especially during rush hours.
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Feynman: Probability and Uncertainty in Quantum Mechanics

Richard Feynman courtesy of the Cornell Messenger Lecture Archive. Cornell Mathematics Library. Lecture #6 Probability and Uncertainty in quantum mechanics.
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Semiotics for Beginners: Signs

This is part of a popular hypertext
guide to semiotics by Daniel Chandler at the University
of Wales, Aberystwyth.
Xaos's insight:

We seem as a species to be driven by a desire to make meanings: above all, we are surely Homo significans - meaning-makers. Distinctively, we make meanings through our creation and interpretation of 'signs'. Indeed, according to Peirce, 'we think only in signs' (Peirce 1931-58, 2.302). Signs take the form of words, images, sounds, odours, flavours, acts or objects, but such things have no intrinsic meaning and become signs only when we invest them with meaning. 'Nothing is a sign unless it is interpreted as a sign', declares Peirce (Peirce 1931-58, 2.172). Anything can be a sign as long as someone interprets it as 'signifying' something - referring to or standing for something other than itself. We interpret things as signs largely unconsciously by relating them to familiar systems of conventions. It is this meaningful use of signs which is at the heart of the concerns of semiotics.

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Deleuze, Values, and Normativity for Deleuze and Ethics - Daniel W. Smith

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Thus, Deleuze and Guattari conceive the relationship between change – in theorm o becoming – and history as one in which processes o becoming pullaway rom the determinacy o history, turning away rom it not in order todispense with it but to exceed it, reinvigorating the present with “an unhistori-cal element.” They write, or instance, that “Philosophy cannot be reduced toits own history, because it continually wrests itsel rom this history in order tocreate new concepts that all back into history but do not come rom it. Howcould something come rom history? Without history, becoming would remainindeterminate and unconditioned, but becoming is not historical. . . . The eventitsel needs becoming as an unhistorical element” (Deleuze and Guattari 1994:96; 1991: 92).

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Jay Griffiths - Forests of the mind

Jay Griffiths - Forests of the mind | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
What is the greatest human gift? It is metaphor, carrying a cargo of meaning across the oceans that divide us
Xaos's insight:

Eros is coursing through the forest. The forest is mewing with its jaguar life. Life is spiralling into poetry. I am in the other world, I thought, at once in the actual forest and in the forests of the mind where the visible world is not denied but augmented.

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Buddhism and the Brain § SEEDMAGAZINE.COM

Buddhism and the Brain § SEEDMAGAZINE.COM | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Many of Buddhism’s core tenets significantly overlap with findings from modern neurology and neuroscience. So how did Buddhism come close to getting the brain right?
Xaos's insight:

Over the last few decades many Buddhists and quite a few neuroscientists have examined Buddhism and neuroscience, with both groups reporting overlap. I’m sorry to say I have been privately dismissive. One hears this sort of thing all the time, from any religion, and I was sure in this case it would break down upon closer scrutiny. When a scientific discovery seems to support any religious teaching, you can expect members of that religion to become strict empiricists, telling themselves and the world that their belief is grounded in reality. They are always less happy to accept scientific data they feel contradicts their preconceived beliefs. No surprise here; no human likes to be wrong.

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philosophy bites: Alan Ryan on Freedom and Its History

philosophy bites: Alan Ryan on Freedom and Its History | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Alan Ryan explores questions about what freedom has meant at different times in history in this Philosophy Bites podcast interview with Nigel Warburton.
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Nassim Taleb on Fragility and Antifragility | The Daily Capitalist

Nassim Taleb on Fragility and Antifragility | The Daily Capitalist | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Nassim Nicholas Taleb is, as my readers know, my favorite contemporary philosopher. He has come out with a new book, Antifragile: Things That Gain from
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Some made the mistake of thinking that I hoped to see us develop better methods for predicting black swans. Others asked if we should just give up and throw our hands in the air: If we could not measure the risks of potential blowups, what were we to do? The answer is simple: We should try to create institutions that won’t fall apart when we encounter black swans—or that might even gain from these unexpected events.

Fragility is the quality of things that are vulnerable to volatility. Take the coffee cup on your desk: It wants peace and quiet because it incurs more harm than benefit from random events. The opposite of fragile, therefore, isn’t robust or sturdy or resilient—things with these qualities are simply difficult to break

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Cargo cult science by Richard Feynman   Adapted...

Cargo cult science by Richard Feynman   Adapted... | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Cargo cult science by Richard Feynman
Adapted from the Caltech commencement address given in 1974.
“During the Middle Ages there were all kinds of crazy ideas, such as that a piece of rhinoceros horn...
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Nassim Taleb on antifragility

Nassim Taleb on antifragility | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
The author of "The Black Swan" and "Fooled by Randomness" on why some systems actually benefit from shocks...
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philosophy bites: Sarah Bakewell on Michel de Montaigne

philosophy bites: Sarah Bakewell on Michel de Montaigne | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Michel Montaigne was an unusual and quirky figure. His essays are strangely modern in tone and remarkable for their honesty, originality and insight.
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Nietzsche, Eric Walther introduces the infamous iconoclast | Issue 93 | Philosophy Now

Nietzsche, Eric Walther introduces the infamous iconoclast | Issue 93 | Philosophy Now | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

Friedrich Nietzsche, who was born in 1844, fell silent in 1889, and died eleven years later, was the first great philosopher of the twentieth century. What made, and makes, him so important, is that he recognized with great clarity and impressive foresight the most troubling and persistent problem of modernity, the problem of values. His attempts to resolve this problem were not successful, but they did uncover depths of issues that still defeat our best efforts today.Let’s begin with his notorious declaration that “God is dead” (first in The Gay Science, 1872). Secular thinking is a commonplace today, but in Nietzsche’s time this declaration was strikingly prophetic. The point of the claim is not so much to assert atheism: although Nietzsche was certainly an atheist, he was far from being a pioneer of European atheism. Rather, his observation is sociological, in a way: he means that Western culture no longer places God at the center of things. In another way, the term ‘sociological’ is quite misleading, for there is nothing ‘value-neutral’ in Nietzsche’s assertion. The death of God has knocked the pins out from under Western value systems, and revealed an abyss below. The values we still continue to live by have lost their meaning, and we are cast adrift, whether we realize it or not. The question is, what do we do now?


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