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Wisdom 1.0
Assemblage of Substantial Assets Towards Wisdom Version 1.0
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David Barash - Buddhist ecology

David Barash - Buddhist ecology | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Buddhism and ecology both refuse to separate the human and natural worlds – and demand that we act accordingly...

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Noam Chomsky Spells Out the Purpose of Education

Noam Chomsky Spells Out the Purpose of Education | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

E + ducere: “To lead or draw out.” The etymological Latin roots of “education.” According to a former Jesuit professor of mine, the fundamental sense of the word is to draw others out of “darkness,” into a “more magnanimous view” (he’d say, his arms spread wide). As inspirational as this speech was to a seminar group of budding higher educators, it failed to specify the means by which this might be done, or the reason. Lacking a Jesuit sense of mission, I had to figure out for myself what the “darkness” was, what to lead people towards, and why. It turned out to be simpler than I thought, in some respects, since I concluded that it wasn’t my job to decide these things, but rather to present points of view, a collection of methods—an intellectual toolkit, so to speak—and an enthusiastic model. Then get out of the way. That’s all an educator can, and should do, in my humble opinion. Anything more is not education, it’s indoctrination. Seemed simple enough to me at first. If only it were so. Few things, in fact, are more contentious (Google the term “assault on education,” for example).

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Steven Pinker: Linguistics as a Window to Understanding the Brain

"How did humans acquire language? In this lecture, best-selling author Steven Pinker introduces you to linguistics, the evolution of spoken language, and the debate over the existence of an innate universal grammar. He also explores why language is such a fundamental part of social relationships, human biology, and human evolution. Finally, Pinker touches on the wide variety of applications for linguistics, from improving how we teach reading and writing to how we interpret law, politics, and literature."

 

Steven Pinker - Psychologist, Cognitive Scientist, and Linguist at Harvard University.


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Introduction to Philosophy- The University of Edinburgh, free of charge, on the Coursera platform

The course "Introduction to Philosophy" by Dave Ward, Duncan Pritchard, Michela Massimi, Suilin Lavelle, Matthew Chrisman, Allan Hazlett and Alasdair Richmon...
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What is Cybernetics? | www.nettv.ie

What is Cybernetics? | www.nettv.ie | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
'Different definitions of cybernetics according to its evolution from the art of the pilot in Greece to a new scientific paradigm that has changed the world significantly. Its fathers include Norbert Wiener, Gregory Bateson, Warren ...

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Mary Warnock's top 10 philosophy books

Mary Warnock's top 10 philosophy books | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Lady Mary Warnock is a crossbench life peer, moral philosopher and author of a number of books on philosophy, including The Intelligent Person's Guide to Ethics.

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What's invisible? More than you think - John Lloyd

Gravity. The stars in day. Thoughts. The human genome. Time. Atoms. So much of what really matters in the world is impossible to see. A stunning animation of John Lloyd's classic TEDTalk from 2009, which will make you question what you actually know.

Lesson by John Lloyd, animation by Cognitive Media.


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Massimo Pigliucci – On consilience

Massimo Pigliucci – On consilience | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
For decades the sciences and the humanities have fought for knowledge supremacy.

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Friedrich Nietzsche - Beyond Good and Evil : Part VI - Aphorism # 212 (philosophy quote)

Friedrich Nietzsche - Beyond Good and Evil : Part VI - Aphorism # 212 (philosophy quote) | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Friedrich Nietzsche Online Text Library, Book Title: Beyond Good and Evil, Part VI, Aphorism #212 (philosophy quote)...
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Nietzsche and the Crisis in Philosophy : Walter Kaufmann : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive

Nietzsche and the Crisis in Philosophy : Walter Kaufmann : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

Part 2 of 3 Lectures: Kierkegaard and the Crisis in Religion Nietzsche and the Crisis in Philosophy Sartre and the Crisis in Morality Dr. Walter Kaufmann focuses on the contribution of Friedrich Nietzsche to the philosophical world, picturing him as a revolutionary heretic and the embodiment of the Socratic spirit. He traces in Nietzsche's works the craving for intellectual integrity, his break with Richard Wagner over the composer's anti-Semetic and anti-French sentiments, and ultimately, his madness, ascribed to having "burned himself out." 1960.

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U B U W E B - Film & Video: Jean Baudrillard (1974)

Jean Baudrillard thinking and talking about the violence of the image,aggression, oppression, transgression,regression, effects and causes of violence, violence of the virtual, 3d, virtual reality, transparency, psychological and imaginary.

An open Lecture given by Jean Baudrillard after his seminar for the students at the European Graduate School, EGS Media and Communication Program Studies Department, Saas-Fee, Switzerland, Europe, in 2004.

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A lecture by Charlie Gere titled Re-thinking the Digital at Jerwood Visual Arts.

Jerwood Encounters: Assembly 9 May – 24 June 2012 Kim Coleman & Jenny Hogarth The Hut Project Charlie Woolley Monday 21 May 2012 A lecture by Charlie Gere…...
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Isaac Asimov on Bill Moyers World of Ideas pt 1

1988 Interview with Isaac Asimov by Bill Moyers - about learning, computers, religion, population growth, the universe..

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Asimov on the future of having access to knowledge from one's home computer.
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The Man Without Content - Di Giorgio Agamben

The Man Without Content - Di Giorgio Agamben | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
In this book, one of Italy’s most important and original contemporary philosophers considers the status of art in the modern era.
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Manuel DeLanda, Deleuze and the Open-ended Becoming of the World (1998)

Manuel DeLanda, Deleuze and the Open-ended Becoming of the World (1998) | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

With the final mathematization of classical physics in the nineteenth century, a certain picture of the world emerged dominant, one in which clockwork determinism reigned supreme and time played no creative role, so that the future was effectively closed, completely given in the past. Although the set of equations with which Hamilton was able to unify all the different fields of classical physics (mechanics, optics, and the elementary theory of electromagnetism) did contain a variable for time, this variable played only an extrinsic role: once the equations were defined for a specific instant, both the past and the future were completely determined, and could be obtained mechanically by simply integrating the equations. To be sure, this static, timeless picture of reality did not go unchallenged within science, since thermodynamics had already introduced an arrow of time which conflicted with the symmetric conception of classical mechanics, where the past and the future were interchangeable. Nevertheless, as the history of statistical mechanics makes it clear, much scientific effort has been spent in our century to reconcile time asymmetry at the level of large aggregates with the still accepted time symmetry at the level of individual interactions.

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David Christian: The history of our world in 18 minutes | Video on TED.com

TED Talks Backed by stunning illustrations, David Christian narrates a complete history of the universe, from the Big Bang to the Internet, in a riveting 18 minutes.
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Constructor Theory | Conversation | Edge

Constructor Theory | Conversation | Edge | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

There's a notorious problem with defining information within physics, namely that on the one hand information is purely abstract, and the original theory of computation as developed by Alan Turing and others regarded computers and the information they manipulate purely abstractly as mathematical objects. Many mathematicians to this day don't realize that information is physical and that there is no such thing as an abstract computer. Only a physical object can compute things.


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What Can You Really Know? by Freeman Dyson | The New York Review of Books

What Can You Really Know? by Freeman Dyson | The New York Review of Books | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

Opinions vary widely concerning the proper limits of science. For me, the multiverse is philosophy and not science. Science is about facts that can be tested and mysteries that can be explored, and I see no way of testing hypotheses of the multiverse. Philosophy is about ideas that can be imagined and stories that can be told. I put narrow limits on science, but I recognize other sources of human wisdom going beyond science. Other sources of wisdom are literature, art, history, religion, and philosophy. The multiverse has its place in philosophy and in literature.

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Sign in to read: Lethal weapons and the evolution of civilisation - 10 October 2012 - New Scientist

Sign in to read: Lethal weapons and the evolution of civilisation - 10 October 2012 - New Scientist | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

IT'S about 2 metres long, made of tough spruce wood and carved into a sharp point at one end. The widest part, and hence its centre of gravity, is in the front third, suggesting it was thrown like a javelin. At 400,000 years old, this is the world's oldest spear. And, according to a provocative theory, on its carved length rests nothing less than the foundation of human civilisation as we know it, including democracy, class divisions and the modern nation state.

At the heart of this theory is a simple idea: the invention of weapons that could kill at a distance meant that power became uncoupled from physical strength. Even the puniest subordinate could now kill an alpha male, with the right weapon and a reasonable aim. Those who wanted power were forced to obtain it by other means - persuasion, cunning, charm - and so began the drive ...

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Capitalism - By Slavoj Zizek

Capitalism - By Slavoj Zizek | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

One might think that a crisis brought on by rapacious, unregulated capitalism would have changed a few minds about the fundamental nature of the global economy.

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Sugata Mitra: The child-driven education | Video on TED.com

Education scientist Sugata Mitra tackles one of the greatest problems of education -- the best teachers and schools don't exist where they're needed most. In a series of real-life experiments from New Delhi to South Africa to Italy, he gave kids self-supervised access to the web and saw results that could revolutionize how we think about teaching.

Sugata Mitra's "Hole in the Wall" experiments have shown that, in the absence of supervision or formal teaching, children can teach themselves and each other, if they're motivated by curiosity and peer interest

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The Evolved Apprentice « On the Human

The Evolved Apprentice « On the Human | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

Human evolutionary change has been rapid and extensive; so much so that the genetic similarity and recent divergence between the human and the chimp lineages came as a profound surprise. Three million years ago humans were relatively minor elements of a rich East African mammalian fauna. Since then, our lineage has expanded geographically, demographically and ecologically. Over roughly the same period, our lineage has experienced an explosive increase in co-operation. We are the only large mammal that depends for essential resources on co-operation with non-relatives. Likewise, tool-use. Beginning about 2.5 million years ago, we became obligate technovores, with the pace of innovation picking up over the last 200,000 years. These changes have been accompanied by others in morphology, life history and family organization. We are not what we used to be. Tellingly, this pattern has not been mirrored in other lineages, as it would be if this trajectory had an external cause. So a first framing idea is that human evolutionary change has been self-generated through positive feedback. Specifically: a feedback loop driven by the increasing complexity of human social environments, and by the problems this complexity causes for co-operation management.


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How do neurons connect to each others? Blue Brain Project opens new insights.

One of the greatest challenges in neuroscience is to identify the map of connections between neurons. In a landmark paper published in PNAS, the EPFL's Blue Brain Project (BBP) has identified key principles that determine synapse-scale connectivity by virtually reconstructing a cortical microcircuit and comparing it to a mammalian sample.

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WHERE GOOD IDEAS COME FROM by Steven Johnson

One of our most innovative, popular thinkers takes on-in exhilarating style-one of our key questions: Where do good ideas come from?

With Where Good Ideas Come From, Steven Johnson pairs the insight of his bestselling Everything Bad Is Good for You and the dazzling erudition of The Ghost Map and The Invention of Air to address an urgent and universal question: What sparks the flash of brilliance? How does groundbreaking innovation happen? Answering in his infectious, culturally omnivorous style, using his fluency in fields from neurobiology to popular culture, Johnson provides the complete, exciting, and encouraging story of how we generate the ideas that push our careers, our lives, our society, and our culture forward.

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