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Wisdom 1.0
Assemblage of Substantial Assets Towards Wisdom Version 1.0
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Massimo Pigliucci – On consilience

Massimo Pigliucci – On consilience | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
For decades the sciences and the humanities have fought for knowledge supremacy.

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Eric Hobsbawm Interview 1/2

Eric Hobsbawm Interview 1/2...
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Friedrich Nietzsche - Beyond Good and Evil : Part VI - Aphorism # 212 (philosophy quote)

Friedrich Nietzsche - Beyond Good and Evil : Part VI - Aphorism # 212 (philosophy quote) | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Friedrich Nietzsche Online Text Library, Book Title: Beyond Good and Evil, Part VI, Aphorism #212 (philosophy quote)...
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Nietzsche and the Crisis in Philosophy : Walter Kaufmann : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive

Nietzsche and the Crisis in Philosophy : Walter Kaufmann : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

Part 2 of 3 Lectures: Kierkegaard and the Crisis in Religion Nietzsche and the Crisis in Philosophy Sartre and the Crisis in Morality Dr. Walter Kaufmann focuses on the contribution of Friedrich Nietzsche to the philosophical world, picturing him as a revolutionary heretic and the embodiment of the Socratic spirit. He traces in Nietzsche's works the craving for intellectual integrity, his break with Richard Wagner over the composer's anti-Semetic and anti-French sentiments, and ultimately, his madness, ascribed to having "burned himself out." 1960.

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U B U W E B - Film & Video: Jean Baudrillard (1974)

Jean Baudrillard thinking and talking about the violence of the image,aggression, oppression, transgression,regression, effects and causes of violence, violence of the virtual, 3d, virtual reality, transparency, psychological and imaginary.

An open Lecture given by Jean Baudrillard after his seminar for the students at the European Graduate School, EGS Media and Communication Program Studies Department, Saas-Fee, Switzerland, Europe, in 2004.

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A lecture by Charlie Gere titled Re-thinking the Digital at Jerwood Visual Arts.

Jerwood Encounters: Assembly 9 May – 24 June 2012 Kim Coleman & Jenny Hogarth The Hut Project Charlie Woolley Monday 21 May 2012 A lecture by Charlie Gere…...
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dialogues at greenwich: 'A fantastic decomposition of the self.' Deleuze on Individuation in 'The Exhausted', Essays Critical and Clinical.

dialogues at greenwich: 'A fantastic decomposition of the self.' Deleuze on Individuation in 'The Exhausted', Essays Critical and Clinical. | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

16 January 2007

'A fantastic decomposition of the self.' Deleuze on Individuation in 'The Exhausted', Essays Critical and Clinical.

Presentation:
'A fantastic decomposition of the self.' Deleuze on Individuation in 'The Exhausted', Essays Critical and Clinical.

Linking 'a fantastic decomposition of the self' with its individuation means that the self is disconnected from its established notions of itself in order to connect it with its own production. Deleuze's concern with the production of experience is developed in his engagement with Samuel Beckett in The Exhausted Hereafter 'TE'). He develops the continuity of production behind the discontinuity of what has already been produced. He finds that the latter, as discontinuous and countable, is exhausted or decomposed by the doubling of its own production in Beckett's work. This is effected through an art or science of exhaustion. A ‘fantastic decomposition’ is then a stage in the process of production or individuation that Deleuze is concerned with.

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John Cage Performs Water Walk on “I’ve Got a Secret” (1960)

John Cage Performs Water Walk on “I’ve Got a Secret” (1960) | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
In 1952, John Cage composed his most controversial piece, 4′33,″ a four-and-a-half minute reflection on the sound of silence. Now fast forward eight years.It’s February, 1960, and we find the composer teaching his famous Experimental Composition courses at The New School in NYC, and paying a visit to the CBS game show “I’ve Got a Secret.” The TV show offered Cage something of a teachable moment, a chance to introduce the broader public to his brand of avant-garde music. Cage’s piece is called Water Walk (1959), and it’s all performed with unconventional instruments, save a grand piano. A water pitcher, iron pipe, goose call, bathtub, rubber duckie, and five unplugged radios — they all make the music. And the audience doesn’t quite know how to react, except with nervous laughter. It wasn’t particularly courteous. But, as one scholar has noted, it’s equally remarkable that prime time TV gave ten minutes of uninterrupted airtime to avant-garde music. You take the good with the bad.
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Infinite Worlds: A Journey through Parallel Universes

Infinite Worlds: A Journey through Parallel Universes | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

The multiverse hypothesis, suggesting that our universe is but one of perhaps infinitely many, speaks to the very nature of reality. Physicist Brian Greene, cosmologists Alan Guth and Andrei Linde, and philosopher Nick Bostrom discuss and debate this controversial implication of forefront research and explore its potential for redefining the cosmic order. Moderated by Robert Krulwich and featuring an original musical interlude, inspired by parallel worlds, by DJ Spooky.

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Stress: Portrait of a Killer - via K21ST - Essential 21ST Century knowledge

Stress: Portrait of a Killer - via K21ST - Essential 21ST Century knowledge | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

National Geographic Documentary. Over the last three decades, science has been advancing our understanding of stress—how it impacts our bodies and how our social standing can make us more or less susceptible. From baboon troops on the plains of Africa, to neuroscience labs at Stanford University, scientists are revealing just how lethal stress can be. Research tells us that the impact of stress can be found deep within us, shrinking our brains, adding fat to our bellies, even unraveling our chromosomes. Understanding how stress works can help us figure out ways to combat it and how to live a life free of the tyranny of this contemporary plague.

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Slavoj Zizek - First as Tragedy, Then as Farce

Slavoj Zizek - First as Tragedy, Then as Farce | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Slavoj Zizek, one of the worlds most influential living philosophers discusses capitalism's flawed priorities.He wants to develop a very simple linear line of thought about one point: Why in our economy charity is no longer classed as an idiosyncrasy of some good guys, here and there, but basic constituent of our economy.

He starts with the so called feature of the today’s cultural capitalism and how the same thing applies to the economy in the narrower sense of the term.

Namely if in the old times, precisely before the transformations of capitalism into more cultural, post-modern, and carrying for ecology, there was a simple opposition between the consummation and speculation and what you actually do for the society.

For example, George Soros (an old school capitalist) in the morning grabs the money, and in the afternoon he gives the half of the money back to charities. In the modern capitalism there is a tendency to bring those two dimensions together, in one and same gesture.

Today when you buy something, your anti-consumerism duty to do something for the environment and the people is already included into it. An example would be Starbucks. When you buy a coffee they will explicitly tell you: It’s not just what are you buying, it’s what are you buying into.
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Mariana Soffer's comment, July 25, 2012 5:28 AM
I used to read this guy long time ago, thanks for bringing it back
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Kurt Vonnegut on the Shapes of Stories

Short lecture by Kurt Vonnegut on the 'simple shapes of stories.'...
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Platonic Ignorance By Massimo Pigliucci

Platonic Ignorance By Massimo Pigliucci | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

Plato famously maintained that knowledge is “justified true belief,” meaning that to claim the status of knowledge our beliefs (say, that the earth goes around the sun, rather than the other way around) have to be both true (to the extent this can actually be ascertained) and justified (i.e., we ought to be able to explain to others why we hold such beliefs, otherwise we are simply repeating the — possibly true — beliefs of someone else).*

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Capitalism - By Slavoj Zizek

Capitalism - By Slavoj Zizek | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

One might think that a crisis brought on by rapacious, unregulated capitalism would have changed a few minds about the fundamental nature of the global economy.

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Sugata Mitra: The child-driven education | Video on TED.com

Education scientist Sugata Mitra tackles one of the greatest problems of education -- the best teachers and schools don't exist where they're needed most. In a series of real-life experiments from New Delhi to South Africa to Italy, he gave kids self-supervised access to the web and saw results that could revolutionize how we think about teaching.

Sugata Mitra's "Hole in the Wall" experiments have shown that, in the absence of supervision or formal teaching, children can teach themselves and each other, if they're motivated by curiosity and peer interest

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The Evolved Apprentice « On the Human

The Evolved Apprentice « On the Human | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

Human evolutionary change has been rapid and extensive; so much so that the genetic similarity and recent divergence between the human and the chimp lineages came as a profound surprise. Three million years ago humans were relatively minor elements of a rich East African mammalian fauna. Since then, our lineage has expanded geographically, demographically and ecologically. Over roughly the same period, our lineage has experienced an explosive increase in co-operation. We are the only large mammal that depends for essential resources on co-operation with non-relatives. Likewise, tool-use. Beginning about 2.5 million years ago, we became obligate technovores, with the pace of innovation picking up over the last 200,000 years. These changes have been accompanied by others in morphology, life history and family organization. We are not what we used to be. Tellingly, this pattern has not been mirrored in other lineages, as it would be if this trajectory had an external cause. So a first framing idea is that human evolutionary change has been self-generated through positive feedback. Specifically: a feedback loop driven by the increasing complexity of human social environments, and by the problems this complexity causes for co-operation management.


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How do neurons connect to each others? Blue Brain Project opens new insights.

One of the greatest challenges in neuroscience is to identify the map of connections between neurons. In a landmark paper published in PNAS, the EPFL's Blue Brain Project (BBP) has identified key principles that determine synapse-scale connectivity by virtually reconstructing a cortical microcircuit and comparing it to a mammalian sample.

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WHERE GOOD IDEAS COME FROM by Steven Johnson

One of our most innovative, popular thinkers takes on-in exhilarating style-one of our key questions: Where do good ideas come from?

With Where Good Ideas Come From, Steven Johnson pairs the insight of his bestselling Everything Bad Is Good for You and the dazzling erudition of The Ghost Map and The Invention of Air to address an urgent and universal question: What sparks the flash of brilliance? How does groundbreaking innovation happen? Answering in his infectious, culturally omnivorous style, using his fluency in fields from neurobiology to popular culture, Johnson provides the complete, exciting, and encouraging story of how we generate the ideas that push our careers, our lives, our society, and our culture forward.

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Philosophy vs science: which can answer the big questions of life?

Philosophy vs science: which can answer the big questions of life? | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

Science is what you know, philosophy is what you don’t know” — Bertrand Russell

 

“In the eighteenth century, philosophers considered the whole of human knowledge, including science, to be their field and discussed questions such as: did the universe have a beginning? However, in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, science became too technical and mathematical for the philosophers, or anyone else except a few specialists. Philosophers reduced the scope of their inquiries so much that Wittgenstein, the most famous philosopher of this century, said, “The sole remaining task for philosophy is the analysis of language.” (…)

 

However, if we do discover a complete theory, it should in time be understandable in broad principle by everyone, not just a few scientists. Then we shall all, philosophers, scientists, and just ordinary people, be able to take part in the discussion of the question of why it is that we and the universe exist.”
— Stephen Hawking, A Brief History of Time

 

"The [“why”] question is meaningless. (…) Not only has “why” become “how” but “why” no longer has any useful meaning, given that it presumes purpose for which there is no evidence. (…)

 

It is not a large leap of the imagination to expect that we will one day be able to break down those social actions, studied on a macro scale, to biological reactions at a micro scale. (...)

 

When it comes to the universe as a whole, we may be frighteningly close to the limits of empirical inquiry as a guide to understanding. After that, we will have to rely on good ideas alone, and that is always much harder and less reliable.”

 

 


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Chance Conversations: An Interview with Merce Cunningham and John Cage

In the spring of 1981, during a residency at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota, choreographer Merce Cunningham and composer John Cage sat down to discuss their work and artistic process. As frequent collaborators, Cage and Cunningham pioneered a new framework of performance. Their novel approach allowed for mediums to exist independently, or rather cohabitate, within a performance, thus abandoning the co-dependent model of dance and music. Cage and Cunningham go on to discuss the methodology and motivations behind chance operations, a term used to describe artistic decisions based on unpredictability. Wanting to free himself of his likes and dislikes, Cage describes how Zen Buddhism influenced his work, leading him to use tools of chance. These new methods, adopted by both Cunningham and Cage, overturned a whole foundation of thought around music, movement, and the process of creating art.

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Bertrand Russell - Face to Face Interview (BBC, 1959)

Bertrand Russell (1872 -- 1970) was a British philosopher, logician, mathematician, historian, and social critic. At various points in his life he considered himself a liberal, a socialist, and a pacifist, but he also admitted that he had never been any of these in any profound sense. He was born in Monmouthshire, into one of the most prominent aristocratic families in Britain

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Evolution Created Free Will | Daniel Dennett | Big Think

For billions of years on this planet, there was life but no free will. The difference is not in physics—which has remained the same—but is ultimately in biology, specifically evolutionary biology.
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The Last Question - By Isaac Asimov

The Last Question - By Isaac Asimov | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

saac Asimov was the most prolific science fiction author of all time. In fifty years he averaged a new magazine article, short story, or book every two weeks, and most of that on a manual typewriter. Asimov thought that The Last Question, first copyrighted in 1956, was his best short story ever. Even if you do not have the background in science to be familiar with all of the concepts presented here, the ending packs more impact than any other book that I've ever read. Don't read the end of the story first!

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New Money for a New World 7/19 - interview with Bernard Lietaer

New Money for a New World - interview with Bernard Lietaer - part 7 of 19 Continues at: http://vimeo.com/44763319 New Money for a New World examines a previously unexamined culprit for the many issues we face today—the monopoly of our centuries old monetary system. This book also provides many ways and means that are now readily available to stop the current juggernaut towards global self destruction.

Many of the solutions offered within this book are more than theory. Communities from around the world have successfully addressed a myriad of issues without the need to raise taxes, redistribute wealth, or depend upon enlightened self interest from corporate entities. Rather the improvements were realized simply and effectively by rethinking money. With such a shift everything is possible.

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Jane McGonigal: The game that can give you 10 extra years of life | Video on TED.com

TED Talks When game designer Jane McGonigal found herself bedridden and suicidal following a severe concussion, she had a fascinating idea for how to get better. She dove into the scientific research and created the healing game, SuperBetter.
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