Wisdom 1.0
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Wisdom 1.0
Assemblage of Substantial Assets Towards Wisdom Version 1.0
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There is no death, only a series of eternal ‘nows’ – Bob Berman & Robert Lanza | Aeon Opinions

Here we tell you what happens after you’re dead. Seriously. Okay, it’s not so serious, because you won’t actually die. 
To lay the groundwork, let's recap the scientific view of death: essentially, you drop dead and that’s the end of everything
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Sci-fi still influences how society thinks about genes – it's time we caught up

Sci-fi still influences how society thinks about genes – it's time we caught up | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
We used to think that our fate was in the stars. Now we know in large measure, our fate is in our genes.

When the Nobel laureate and co-discoverer of the DNA double helix James Watson made his famous statement in 1989, he was implying that access to a person’s genetic code allows you to predict the outcome of their life.

The troubling implications were not lost on people, of course. A few years later they were explored in the American film Gattaca, which depicted a civilisation from the near future that had embraced this kind of genetic determinism. It was a world in which most people are conceived in test tubes, and taken to term only if they passed genetic tests designed to prevent them from inheriting imperfections ranging from baldness to serious genetic diseases.

With these so-called “valids” – the dominant majority – the film was a warning about the dangers in our technological advancement. As it turns out, we were probably being optimistic about the potential of genetics. Yet too few people seem to have got that message, and this kind of mistaken thinking about the links between genes and traits is having unsettling consequences of its own.

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Closer To Truth: What Is Information?

Information is all the rage in science, changing how we think about fundamental questions. Information has many descriptions, some of them surprising. Why is Information…

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Erving Goffman and the performed self — Aeon Videos

The 20th-century Canadian-American sociologist Erving Goffman believed that we adapt to roles – lover, customer, worker – based on circumstance, and are constantly concerned with how we’re appearing to others. This short animation explains why Goffman’s view of humanity left no room for a ‘true self’ – an actor behind all the roles we play.
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System & Technics - Interview of Bernard Stiegler - in Spanda Journal, Systemic Change

System & Technics - Interview of Bernard Stiegler - in Spanda Journal, Systemic Change | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
By Helene Finidori in Epistemology and Hermeneutics. An Interview of Bernard Stiegler by Helene Finidori, published in The Spanda Journal VI,1 on Systemic Change.
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Sayfan G. Borghini: Designing Social Environments

12th ECCO/GBI Seminar Series (2015-2016) Topic: Designing Social Environments (seminar + discussion) Speaker: Sayfan G. Borghini (HIT, Israel) November 27, 2...
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Ibn al-Haytham – The First Scientist

Ibn al-Haytham – The First Scientist | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Today’s textbooks speak of Newton, Galileo, and Einstein, but ignore the man who inspired them. Without Ibn al-Haytham, science as we know it would not exist.
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Home | History of Philosophy without any gaps

Home | History of Philosophy without any gaps | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Peter Adamson, Professor of Philosophy at the LMU in Munich and at King's College London, takes listeners through the history of philosophy, "without any gaps."

Via Wildcat2030, FastTFriend
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Berta Civera's curator insight, September 28, 2015 3:03 AM

Historia de la Filosofía de Peter Adamson, en inglés

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A visual history of human knowledge

A visual history of human knowledge | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
How does knowledge grow? Sometimes it begins with one insight and grows into many branches. Infographics expert Manuel Lima explores the thousand-year history of mapping data -- from languages to dynasties -- using trees of information. It's a fascinating history of visualizations, and a look into humanity's urge to map what we know.
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The Flâneur: A Radical-Chic Icon

The Flâneur: A Radical-Chic Icon | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
" There was the pedestrian who wedged himself into the crowd, but there was also the flâneur who demanded elbow room and was unwilling to forego the life of the gentleman of leisure. His leisurely ...
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Metrosophy: Philosophy and the City

Metrosophy: Philosophy and the City | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Where is philosophy? This is not a typo. What is philosophy is a common question. But rarely do we wonder where it is, physically speaking. Imagine a philosopher at work. Where does this scene take place?

Philosophy is typically depicted as a solitary activity conducted in remote natural settings — a hut next to a fjord, a clearing in the middle of a forest, a cave on the slope of a mountain, or, these days, a rocking chair on a porch in a quaint college town. Certainly, some great thinkers (Wittgenstein, Heidegger and Nietzsche among them) were responsible for promoting this bucolic ethos. But even a superficial familiarity with the history of Western philosophy reveals that the city is virtually a necessary condition for the possibility of doing theoretical work, which may then be carried on in other, less hectic places.

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This Philosopher Helped Ensure There Was No Nobel for Relativity - Issue 35: Boundaries - Nautilus

This Philosopher Helped Ensure There Was No Nobel for Relativity - Issue 35: Boundaries - Nautilus | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
On April 6, 1922, Einstein met a man he would never forget. He was one of the most celebrated philosophers of the century, widely…
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Forget mindfulness, stop trying to find yourself and start faking it

Forget mindfulness, stop trying to find yourself and start faking it | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Why is the history of Chinese philosophy now the most popular course at Harvard? Top tips on how to become a better person according to Confucius and co
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If Microbes begat Mind: origins of life and intelligence « Zann Gill

If Microbes begat Mind: origins of life and intelligence « Zann Gill | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

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You Must Change Your Life // Reviews // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame

You Must Change Your Life // Reviews // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews is an electronic, peer-reviewed journal that publishes timely reviews of scholarly philosophy books.
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Hierarchies in matter | UTokyo Research

Hierarchies in matter | UTokyo Research | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
A single neuron in isolation cannot be said to possess memory, feelings, or consciousness. However, group many neurons together and the type of advanced information processing that takes place in the human brain suddenly appears. This suggests that perhaps each level in the micro-macro hierarchy can only be understood with a different logic. Might such a hierarchy also exist in ordinary materials that appear on first glance to be more straightforward and less complicated than neurons?
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47 Animated Videos Explain the History of Ideas: From Aristotle to Sartre

47 Animated Videos Explain the History of Ideas: From Aristotle to Sartre | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
This year we've been featuring short animated videos from BBC Radio 4, all covering the big questions: How did everything begin? What makes us human? What is love?
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The Anthropocene Review, 2(2): When and How Did the Anthropocene Begin? (2015) — Monoskop Log

The Anthropocene Review, 2(2): When and How Did the Anthropocene Begin? (2015) — Monoskop Log | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Writings on art, culture, and media technology
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Ugo Mattei: The Transformative Power of the Commons - YouTube

16th May 2015, 19h, Cinema Europa, Zagreb, Croatia 8th Subversive Film Festival "Spaces of Emancipation: Micropolitics and Rebellions" Discussion with: Ska K...
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Foucault, Michel: Ethics | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Foucault, Michel: Ethics | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
The Ethics for the Concern of Self as a Practice of Freedom.
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