Wisdom 1.0
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Wisdom 1.0
Assemblage of Substantial Assets Towards Wisdom Version 1.0
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Roger Penrose On Why Consciousness Does Not Compute - Issue 47: Consciousness - Nautilus

Roger Penrose On Why Consciousness Does Not Compute - Issue 47: Consciousness - Nautilus | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Once you start poking around in the muck of consciousness studies, you will soon encounter the specter of Sir Roger Penrose, the renowned…
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Descartes was wrong: ‘a person is a person through other persons’ – Abeba Birhane | Aeon Ideas

Descartes was wrong: ‘a person is a person through other persons’ – Abeba Birhane | Aeon Ideas | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
According to Ubuntu philosophy, which has its origins in ancient Africa, a newborn baby is not a person. People are born without ‘ena’, or selfhood, and instead must acquire it through interactions and experiences over time. So the ‘self’/‘other
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How many great minds does it take to invent a telescope? – Thony Christie | Aeon Ideas

How many great minds does it take to invent a telescope? – Thony Christie | Aeon Ideas | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
On 11 January 1672, the Fellows of the British Royal Society were treated to a demonstration of Isaac Newton’s reflecting telescope, which formed images with mirrors rather than with the lenses that had been used since the time of Galileo
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Tom Hurka Interview on Bernard Suits's The Grasshopper

Tom Hurka Interview on Bernard Suits's The Grasshopper | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Tom: Actually, Suits is careful to distinguish game-playing from play. The first is an activity that fits his definition, with the goal, rules, and so on, and the second is any activity chosen for its
own sake. So there can be game-playing that isn't play (if you play, say, football only to make money) and play that isn't game-playing (like a kitten's playing with wool). And the value his
book defends is primarily that of game-playing, though in his utopia, where people don't need things like money, the game-playing will also always be play.

Now I think Suits exaggerates the value of game-playing when he says it's the supreme good, and he does so because he's tacitly built into his utopia other things that are comparably
good, such as pleasure and knowledge. Still, his claim that game-playing instantiates one important good, and in fact is the paradigm expression of that good, is a wonderful insight.

In game-playing you aim at a goal that's in itself completely trivial: that a ball go into a hole in the ground, that you cross a line on the track before anyone else does, that you stand atop a mountain. But the rules of the game make achieving that goal complex and difficult, and it's that difficulty that gives the activity its value. To play the game you have to aim at a trivial goal, and you haven't succeeded in the game unless you achieve the goal, but the value of the activity is independent of the value of the goal. That's why I say game-playing is the paradigm expression of modern values, because what those values emphasize is process not product, journey not destination. And there's the big contrast with someone like Aristotle, who said that if an activity produces a goal outside itself, the activity has to have less value than the goal does. Not true! That a ball go into a hole in the ground is completely trivial. That Tiger Woods can make it do so from 562 yards away in four shots is tremendously valuable.
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Neil Gaiman: Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming

Neil Gaiman: Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
A lecture explaining why using our imaginations, and providing for others to use theirs, is an obligation for all citizens
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FastTFriend's curator insight, March 27, 2:30 AM
We all – adults and children, writers and readers – have an obligation to daydream. We have an obligation to imagine. It is easy to pretend that nobody can change anything, that we are in a world in which society is huge and the individual is less than nothing: an atom in a wall, a grain of rice in a rice field. But the truth is, individuals change their world over and over, individuals make the future, and they do it by imagining that things can be different.
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Why Foucault's work on power is more important than ever – Colin Koopman | Aeon Essays

Why Foucault's work on power is more important than ever – Colin Koopman | Aeon Essays | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Original, painstaking, sometimes frustrating and often dazzling. Foucault’s work on power matters now more than ever
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Like start-ups, most intentional communities fail – why? – Alexa Clay | Aeon Essays

Like start-ups, most intentional communities fail – why? – Alexa Clay | Aeon Essays | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Most utopian communities are, like most start-ups, short-lived. What makes the difference between failure and success?
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How ant societies point to radical possibilities for humans – Deborah M Gordon | Aeon Essays

How ant societies point to radical possibilities for humans – Deborah M Gordon | Aeon Essays | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
The ant colony has often served as a metaphor for human order and hierarchy. But real ant society is radical to its core
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Timothy Morton: Ecology without Nature | CCCB LAB

Timothy Morton: Ecology without Nature | CCCB LAB | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
We interview the philosopher Tim Morton, author of “Dark Ecology”, who proposes that we rethink the way we see ecology, anthropocentrism and art.
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Albert Camus’ Historic Lecture, “The Human Crisis,” Performed by Actor Viggo Mortensen

Albert Camus’ Historic Lecture, “The Human Crisis,” Performed by Actor Viggo Mortensen | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
One event in the festival featured actor Viggo Mortensen giving a reading of Camus' lecture,“La Crise de l’homme” (
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Are human rights anything more than legal conventions? – John Tasioulas | Aeon Ideas

Are human rights anything more than legal conventions? – John Tasioulas | Aeon Ideas | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
We live in an age of human rights. The language of human rights has become ubiquitous, a lingua franca used for expressing the most basic demands of justice. Some are old demands, such as the prohibition of torture and slavery. Others are newer, such as claims to internet access or same-sex marriage. But what are human rights, and where do they come from? This question is made urgent by a disquieting thought. Perhaps people with clashing values and convictions can so easily appeal to ‘human rights’ only because, ultimately, they don’t agree on what they are talking about? Maybe the apparently widespread consensus on the significance of human rights depends on the emptiness of that very notion? If this is true, then talk of human rights is rhetorical window-dressing, masking deeper ethical and political divisions.

Philosophers have debated the nature of human rights since at least the 12th century, often under the name of ‘natural rights’. These natural rights were supposed to be possessed by everyone and discoverable with the aid of our ordinary powers of reason (our ‘natural reason’), as opposed to rights established by law or disclosed through divine revelation. Wherever there are philosophers, however, there is disagreement. Belief in human rights left open how we go about making the case for them – are they, for example, protections of human needs generally or only of freedom of choice? There were also disagreements about the correct list of human rights – should it include socio-economic rights, like the rights to health or work, in addition to civil and political rights, such as the rights to a fair trial and political participation?

But many now argue that we should set aside philosophical wrangles over the nature and origins of human rights. In the 21st century, they contend, human rights exist not in the nebulous ether of philosophical speculation, but in the black letter of law. Human rights are those laid down in The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) and the various international and domestic laws that implement it. Some who adopt this line of thought might even invoke the 18th-century English philosopher Jeremy Bentham, who contemptuously dismissed the idea of natural rights existing independently of human-made laws as ‘rhetorical nonsense – nonsense upon stilts’.

Via Wildcat2030
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Why God knows more about misbehaviour than anything else – Benjamin Grant Purzycki | Aeon Essays

Why God knows more about misbehaviour than anything else – Benjamin Grant Purzycki | Aeon Essays | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Punitive Big Brother; cosmic petty-thief-catcher; vigilant landlord. Why is God so interested in bad behaviour?
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Silicon Valley Would Rather Cure Death Than Make Life Worth Living

Silicon Valley Would Rather Cure Death Than Make Life Worth Living | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
While Silicon Valley titans are drunk on the transhumanist promise to cure death, people are dying of curable problems that technologists ignore.
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The problem with facts

The problem with facts | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Tim Harford on how today’s politicians deal with inconvenient truths
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Jeong Kwan, the Philosopher Chef

Jeong Kwan, the Philosopher Chef | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
The most exquisite food in the world, say many celebrated chefs, is being made not in Copenhagen or New York, but in a remote temple complex south of Seoul by a 59-year-old Buddhist nun.
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Materialism alone cannot explain the riddle of consciousness – Adam Frank | Aeon Essays

Materialism alone cannot explain the riddle of consciousness – Adam Frank | Aeon Essays | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
The closer you look, the more the materialist position in physics appears to rest on shaky metaphysical ground
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The Trouble with Quantum Mechanics

The Trouble with Quantum Mechanics | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
The development of quantum mechanics in the first decades of the twentieth century came as a shock to many physicists. Today, despite the great successes of quantum mechanics, arguments continue about its meaning, and its future.
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How the medium shapes the message | Cesar Hidalgo | TEDxYouth@BeaconStreet

How communication technologies shape our collective memory. César A. Hidalgo is an assistant professor at the MIT Media Lab. Hidalgo’s work focuses o
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How would the Stoics cope today? | Ryan Holiday

How would the Stoics cope today? | Ryan Holiday | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Some of us are stressed. Others are overworked, struggling with the new responsibilities of parenthood, or moving from one flawed relationship to another. Whatever it is, whatever you are going through, there is wisdom from the Stoics that can help.

Followers of this ancient and inscrutable philosophy have found themselves at the centre of some of history’s most trying ordeals, from the French Revolution to the American Civil War to the prison camps of Vietnam. Bill Clinton reportedly reads Roman Emperor and stoic Marcus Aurelius’s Meditations once a year, and one can imagine him handing a copy to Hillary after her heart-wrenching loss in the US presidential election.

Stoicism is a school of philosophy which was founded in Athens in the early 3rd century and then progressed to Rome, where it became a pragmatic way of addressing life’s problems. The central message is, we don’t control what happens to us; we control how we respond.

The Stoics were really writing and thinking about one thing: how to live. The questions they asked were not arcane or academic but practical and real. “What do I do about my anger?” “What do I do if someone insults me?” “I’m afraid to die; why is that?” “How can I deal with the difficult situations I face?” “How can I deal with the success or power I hold?”

There also happens to be a decent amount of advice on how to live under the looming threat of a tyrant (“I may wish to be free from torture, but if the time comes for me to endure it, I’ll wish to bear it courageously with bravery and honour,” wrote the Roman philosopher Seneca). All of which makes Stoic philosophy particularly well-suited to the world we live in.

While it would be hard to find a word dealt a greater injustice at the hands of the English language than “stoicism”— with its mistaken connotations of austerity and lack of emotion — in fact, nothing could be more necessary for our times than a good dose of Stoic philosophy.

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Why are these 32 symbols found in ancient caves all over Europe?

Why are these 32 symbols found in ancient caves all over Europe? | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Written language, the hallmark of human civilization, didn't just suddenly appear one day. Thousands of years before the first fully developed writing systems, our ancestors scrawled geometric signs across the walls of the caves they sheltered in. Paleoanthropologist, rock art researcher and TED Senior Fellow Genevieve von Petzinger has studied and codified these ancient markings in caves across Europe. The uniformity of her findings suggest that graphic communication, and the ability to preserve and transmit messages beyond a single moment in time, may be much older than we think.
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How the old and the new make the mind ebb and flow – Daniel J Siegel | Aeon Essays

The most vivid part of the mind bubbles up through sensation and new experience when unencumbered by analytical thought
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