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The self: The one and only you - 20 February 2013 - New Scientist

The self: The one and only you - 20 February 2013 - New Scientist | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

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FastTFriend's curator insight, February 26, 2013 2:30 AM

Three beliefs about the self are absolutely fundamental for our belief of who we are. First, we regard ourselves as unchanging and continuous. This is not to say that we remain forever the same, but that among all this change there is something that remains constant and that makes the "me" today the same person I was five years ago and will be five years in the future.

Second, we see our self as the unifier that brings it all together. The world presents itself to us as a cacophony of sights, sounds, smells, mental images, recollections and so forth. In the self, these are all integrated and an image of a single, unified world emerges.

Finally, the self is an agent. It is the thinker of our thoughts and the doer of our deeds. It is where the representation of the world, unified into one coherent whole, is used so we can act on this world.

All of these beliefs appear to be blindingly obvious and as certain as can be. But as we look at them more closely, they become less and less self-evident.

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Assemblage of Substantial Assets Towards Wisdom Version 1.0
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You Must Change Your Life // Reviews // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame

You Must Change Your Life // Reviews // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews is an electronic, peer-reviewed journal that publishes timely reviews of scholarly philosophy books.
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Hierarchies in matter | UTokyo Research

Hierarchies in matter | UTokyo Research | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
A single neuron in isolation cannot be said to possess memory, feelings, or consciousness. However, group many neurons together and the type of advanced information processing that takes place in the human brain suddenly appears. This suggests that perhaps each level in the micro-macro hierarchy can only be understood with a different logic. Might such a hierarchy also exist in ordinary materials that appear on first glance to be more straightforward and less complicated than neurons?
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47 Animated Videos Explain the History of Ideas: From Aristotle to Sartre

47 Animated Videos Explain the History of Ideas: From Aristotle to Sartre | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
This year we've been featuring short animated videos from BBC Radio 4, all covering the big questions: How did everything begin? What makes us human? What is love?
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The Anthropocene Review, 2(2): When and How Did the Anthropocene Begin? (2015) — Monoskop Log

The Anthropocene Review, 2(2): When and How Did the Anthropocene Begin? (2015) — Monoskop Log | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Writings on art, culture, and media technology
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Ugo Mattei: The Transformative Power of the Commons - YouTube

16th May 2015, 19h, Cinema Europa, Zagreb, Croatia 8th Subversive Film Festival "Spaces of Emancipation: Micropolitics and Rebellions" Discussion with: Ska K...
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Foucault, Michel: Ethics | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Foucault, Michel: Ethics | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
The Ethics for the Concern of Self as a Practice of Freedom.
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Reinventing Organizations - YouTube

A talk, followed by Q&A, by Frederic Laloux about "Reinventing Organizations", a research and book that is turning into an international phenomenon. Increasi...
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Jorge Luis Borges’ 1967-8 Norton Lectures On Poetry (And Everything Else Literary)

Jorge Luis Borges’ 1967-8 Norton Lectures On Poetry (And Everything Else Literary) | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Discover the lecture series that Borges gave at Harvard University in the fall of 1967 and the spring of 1968. Listen to hours of his insights into poetry and other things literary.
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A Letter from Hunter S. Thompson that Changed My Life

A Letter from Hunter S. Thompson that Changed My Life | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Dear Hume,

You ask advice: ah, what a very human and very dangerous thing to do! For to give advice to a man who asks what to do with his life implies something very close to egomania. To presume to point a man to the right and ultimate goal — to point with a trembling finger in the RIGHT direction is something only a fool would take upon himself.

I am not a fool, but I respect your sincerity in asking my advice. I ask you though, in listening to what I say, to remember that all advice can only be a product of the man who gives it. What is truth to one may be disaster to another. I do not see life through your eyes, nor you through mine. If I were to attempt to give you specific advice, it would be too much like the blind leading the blind.

“To be, or not to be: that is the question: Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, or to take arms against a sea of troubles … ” (Shakespeare)

And indeed, that IS the question: whether to float with the tide, or to swim for a goal. It is a choice we must all make consciously or unconsciously at one time in our lives. So few people understand this! Think of any decision you’ve ever made which had a bearing on your future: I may be wrong, but I don’t see how it could have been anything but a choice however indirect — between the two things I’ve mentioned: the floating or the swimming.

But why not float if you have no goal? That is another question. It is unquestionably better to enjoy the floating than to swim in uncertainty. So how does a man find a goal? Not a castle in the stars, but a real and tangible thing. How can a man be sure he’s not after the “big rock candy mountain,” the enticing sugar-candy goal that has little taste and no substance?

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Yuk Hui, Andreas Broeckmann (eds.): 30 Years After Les Immatériaux: Art, Science and Theory (2015) — Monoskop Log

Yuk Hui, Andreas Broeckmann (eds.): 30 Years After Les Immatériaux: Art, Science and Theory (2015) — Monoskop Log | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Writings on art, culture, and media technology
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System & Technics - Interview of Bernard Stiegler - in Spanda Journal, Systemic Change

System & Technics - Interview of Bernard Stiegler - in Spanda Journal, Systemic Change | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
By Helene Finidori in Epistemology and Hermeneutics. An Interview of Bernard Stiegler by Helene Finidori, published in The Spanda Journal VI,1 on Systemic Change.
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Sayfan G. Borghini: Designing Social Environments

12th ECCO/GBI Seminar Series (2015-2016) Topic: Designing Social Environments (seminar + discussion) Speaker: Sayfan G. Borghini (HIT, Israel) November 27, 2...
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Ibn al-Haytham – The First Scientist

Ibn al-Haytham – The First Scientist | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Today’s textbooks speak of Newton, Galileo, and Einstein, but ignore the man who inspired them. Without Ibn al-Haytham, science as we know it would not exist.
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Home | History of Philosophy without any gaps

Home | History of Philosophy without any gaps | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Peter Adamson, Professor of Philosophy at the LMU in Munich and at King's College London, takes listeners through the history of philosophy, "without any gaps."

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Berta Civera's curator insight, September 28, 2015 3:03 AM

Historia de la Filosofía de Peter Adamson, en inglés

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A visual history of human knowledge

A visual history of human knowledge | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
How does knowledge grow? Sometimes it begins with one insight and grows into many branches. Infographics expert Manuel Lima explores the thousand-year history of mapping data -- from languages to dynasties -- using trees of information. It's a fascinating history of visualizations, and a look into humanity's urge to map what we know.
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The Flâneur: A Radical-Chic Icon

The Flâneur: A Radical-Chic Icon | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
" There was the pedestrian who wedged himself into the crowd, but there was also the flâneur who demanded elbow room and was unwilling to forego the life of the gentleman of leisure. His leisurely ...
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Metrosophy: Philosophy and the City

Metrosophy: Philosophy and the City | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Where is philosophy? This is not a typo. What is philosophy is a common question. But rarely do we wonder where it is, physically speaking. Imagine a philosopher at work. Where does this scene take place?

Philosophy is typically depicted as a solitary activity conducted in remote natural settings — a hut next to a fjord, a clearing in the middle of a forest, a cave on the slope of a mountain, or, these days, a rocking chair on a porch in a quaint college town. Certainly, some great thinkers (Wittgenstein, Heidegger and Nietzsche among them) were responsible for promoting this bucolic ethos. But even a superficial familiarity with the history of Western philosophy reveals that the city is virtually a necessary condition for the possibility of doing theoretical work, which may then be carried on in other, less hectic places.

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What explains the rise of humans?

What explains the rise of humans? | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Seventy thousand years ago, our human ancestors were insignificant animals, just minding their own business in a corner of Africa with all the other animals. But now, few would disagree that humans dominate planet Earth; we've spread to every continent, and our actions determine the fate of other animals (and possibly Earth itself). How did we get from there to here? Historian Yuval Noah Harari suggests a surprising reason for the rise of humanity.
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Fermi Paradox, Doomsday Argument, Simulation Hypothesis—is our view of reality seriously flawed?

Fermi Paradox, Doomsday Argument, Simulation Hypothesis—is our view of reality seriously flawed? | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
There are three interlocking statistical arguments concerning the nature of the universe in which we live and which provide what I believe to be a strongly convincing indication that our view of reality is seriously flawed on a massive scale. Let’s begin by asking a simple question…
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For Ever Amber, ennobling working class and marginalized communities - we make money not art

For Ever Amber, ennobling working class and marginalized communities - we make money not art | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
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