Wisdom 1.0
5.3K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Xaos
onto Wisdom 1.0
Scoop.it!

Boundaries of the Knowable

Boundaries of the Knowable | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
In this 10 part series from The Open University, Professor Russell Stannard OBE delves into subjects ranging from free will and determinism, to space and t
Xaos's insight:

How can we ever understand the relationship between consciousness and the physical brain? All day long we have to make choices. Are we really free to choose?

What kind of universe we live in and what caused the Big Bang? Is there intelligent life out there? What is beyond the observable universe? Will the universe close back on itself?

Why the word space so-called empty space isn’t simply another name for nothing? We all start off thinking there is just the one time the same for everyone. Relativity theory shows this not to be the case.

What is the nature of matter and how complete our understanding of matter can be? What is the Wave/Particle Paradox and how Neils Bohr solved it?

more...
No comment yet.
Wisdom 1.0
Assemblage of Substantial Assets Towards Wisdom Version 1.0
Curated by Xaos
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

The 50 Most Influential Living Philosophers | The Best Schools

The 50 Most Influential Living Philosophers | The Best Schools | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Here are the 50 most influential living philosophers, actively changing our understanding of ourselves and our world. Philosophy is far from dead!
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Xaos from Philosophy everywhere everywhen
Scoop.it!

The mind isn’t locked in the brain but extends far beyond it – Keith Frankish | Aeon Ideas

Where is your mind? Where does your thinking occur? Where are your beliefs? René Descartes thought that the mind was an immaterial soul, housed in the pineal gland near the centre of the brain. Nowadays, by contrast, we tend to identify the mind with the brain. We know that mental processes depend on brain processes, and that different brain regions are responsible for different functions. However, we still agree with Descartes on one thing: we still think of the mind as (in a phrase coined by the philosopher of mind Andy Clark) brainbound, locked away in the head, communicating with the body and wider world but separate from them. And this might be quite wrong. I’m not suggesting that the mind is non-physical or doubting that the brain is central to it; but it could be that (as Clark and others argue) the mind extends beyond the brain.

Via Wildcat2030
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Xaos from Philosophy everywhere everywhen
Scoop.it!

Over Time, Buddhism and Science Agree - Issue 36: Aging - Nautilus

Over Time, Buddhism and Science Agree - Issue 36: Aging - Nautilus | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
I remember my grandfather commenting—wry amusement tinged with grim resignation—that what made him finally feel old was seeing his children reach middle age. I was a child then. Now I see my own children, not quite middle aged, starting to have children of their own.

Becoming a grandparent is quite lovely, an affirmation of continuity and a front-row-seat to watch (and even, on occasion, participate) as life itself is conveyed into the future. But aging is also our most undeniable memento mori, a reminder not so much of life as one’s own eventual death. My grandfather’s death frightened me as few things have since, except for the recurring recognition (usually at night, alone, in the dark) that his life, everyone’s life, even—astoundingly—my own, is short indeed.

All things, especially living ones, are marinating in the river of time. We see and understand that our bodies will wear out and we will die. At least that’s how it looks through the lens of Western science, where all things come to an end, winding down in a final surrender to entropy. But there’s another perspective, surprisingly in harmony with science, that helps us revisit that huge and ancient terror—fear of time itself—in a new and perhaps even reassuring way. And that is the perspective offered by Buddhism.

For Buddhists, the “center cannot hold,” as the poet W.B. Yeats pointed out, because it doesn’t exist as something rigidly separate from everything else. Nothing is permanent and unchanging, ourselves included. Attempting to cling to a solid, immutable core of a self is a fool’s errand because time not only creates anarchy, it provides the unavoidable matrix within which everything—animate and inanimate, sentient and insensate—ebbs and flows.

Via Wildcat2030
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

This Philosopher Helped Ensure There Was No Nobel for Relativity - Issue 35: Boundaries - Nautilus

This Philosopher Helped Ensure There Was No Nobel for Relativity - Issue 35: Boundaries - Nautilus | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
On April 6, 1922, Einstein met a man he would never forget. He was one of the most celebrated philosophers of the century, widely…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Forget mindfulness, stop trying to find yourself and start faking it

Forget mindfulness, stop trying to find yourself and start faking it | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Why is the history of Chinese philosophy now the most popular course at Harvard? Top tips on how to become a better person according to Confucius and co
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Xaos from open-ended processes
Scoop.it!

If Microbes begat Mind: origins of life and intelligence « Zann Gill

If Microbes begat Mind: origins of life and intelligence « Zann Gill | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it

Via starwalker
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

You Must Change Your Life // Reviews // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame

You Must Change Your Life // Reviews // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews is an electronic, peer-reviewed journal that publishes timely reviews of scholarly philosophy books.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Hierarchies in matter | UTokyo Research

Hierarchies in matter | UTokyo Research | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
A single neuron in isolation cannot be said to possess memory, feelings, or consciousness. However, group many neurons together and the type of advanced information processing that takes place in the human brain suddenly appears. This suggests that perhaps each level in the micro-macro hierarchy can only be understood with a different logic. Might such a hierarchy also exist in ordinary materials that appear on first glance to be more straightforward and less complicated than neurons?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

47 Animated Videos Explain the History of Ideas: From Aristotle to Sartre

47 Animated Videos Explain the History of Ideas: From Aristotle to Sartre | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
This year we've been featuring short animated videos from BBC Radio 4, all covering the big questions: How did everything begin? What makes us human? What is love?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

The Anthropocene Review, 2(2): When and How Did the Anthropocene Begin? (2015) — Monoskop Log

The Anthropocene Review, 2(2): When and How Did the Anthropocene Begin? (2015) — Monoskop Log | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Writings on art, culture, and media technology
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Once upon a time... how stories change hearts – and brains – Elizabeth Svoboda | Aeon Essays

Across time and culture, stories have been agents of personal transformation – in part because they change our brains
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Xaos from Philosophy everywhere everywhen
Scoop.it!

How philosophy came to disdain the wisdom of oral cultures – Justin E H Smith | Aeon Ideas

A poet, somewhere in Siberia, or the Balkans, or West Africa, some time in the past 60,000 years, recites thousands of memorised lines in the course of an evening. The lines are packed with fixed epithets and clichés. The bard is not concerned with originality, but with intonation and delivery: he or she is perfectly attuned to the circumstances of the day, and to the mood and expectations of his or her listeners.

If this were happening 6,000-plus years ago, the poet’s words would in no way have been anchored in visible signs, in text. For the vast majority of the time that human beings have been on Earth, words have had no worldly reality other than the sound made when they are spoken.

As the theorist Walter J Ong pointed out in Orality and Literacy: Technologizing the Word (1982), it is difficult, perhaps even impossible, now to imagine how differently language would have been experienced in a culture of ‘primary orality’. There would be nowhere to ‘look up a word’, no authoritative source telling us the shape the word ‘actually’ takes. There would be no way to affirm the word’s existence at all except by speaking it – and this necessary condition of survival is important for understanding the relatively repetitive nature of epic poetry. Say it over and over again, or it will slip away. In the absence of fixed, textual anchors for words, there would be a sharp sense that language is charged with power, almost magic: the idea that words, when spoken, can bring about new states of affairs in the world. They do not so much describe, as invoke.

As a consequence of the development of writing, first in the ancient Near East and soon after in Greece, old habits of thought began to die out, and certain other, previously latent, mental faculties began to express themselves. Words were now anchored and, though spellings could change from one generation to another, or one region to another, there were now physical traces that endured, which could be transmitted, consulted and pointed to in settling questions about the use or authority of spoken language.

Via Wildcat2030
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

There is no death, only a series of eternal ‘nows’ – Bob Berman & Robert Lanza | Aeon Opinions

Here we tell you what happens after you’re dead. Seriously. Okay, it’s not so serious, because you won’t actually die. 
To lay the groundwork, let's recap the scientific view of death: essentially, you drop dead and that’s the end of everything
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Xaos from Philosophy everywhere everywhen
Scoop.it!

Sci-fi still influences how society thinks about genes – it's time we caught up

Sci-fi still influences how society thinks about genes – it's time we caught up | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
We used to think that our fate was in the stars. Now we know in large measure, our fate is in our genes.

When the Nobel laureate and co-discoverer of the DNA double helix James Watson made his famous statement in 1989, he was implying that access to a person’s genetic code allows you to predict the outcome of their life.

The troubling implications were not lost on people, of course. A few years later they were explored in the American film Gattaca, which depicted a civilisation from the near future that had embraced this kind of genetic determinism. It was a world in which most people are conceived in test tubes, and taken to term only if they passed genetic tests designed to prevent them from inheriting imperfections ranging from baldness to serious genetic diseases.

With these so-called “valids” – the dominant majority – the film was a warning about the dangers in our technological advancement. As it turns out, we were probably being optimistic about the potential of genetics. Yet too few people seem to have got that message, and this kind of mistaken thinking about the links between genes and traits is having unsettling consequences of its own.

Via Wildcat2030
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Xaos from e.cloud
Scoop.it!

Closer To Truth: What Is Information?

Information is all the rage in science, changing how we think about fundamental questions. Information has many descriptions, some of them surprising. Why is Information…

Via Alessio Erioli
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Erving Goffman and the performed self — Aeon Videos

The 20th-century Canadian-American sociologist Erving Goffman believed that we adapt to roles – lover, customer, worker – based on circumstance, and are constantly concerned with how we’re appearing to others. This short animation explains why Goffman’s view of humanity left no room for a ‘true self’ – an actor behind all the roles we play.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

System & Technics - Interview of Bernard Stiegler - in Spanda Journal, Systemic Change

System & Technics - Interview of Bernard Stiegler - in Spanda Journal, Systemic Change | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
By Helene Finidori in Epistemology and Hermeneutics. An Interview of Bernard Stiegler by Helene Finidori, published in The Spanda Journal VI,1 on Systemic Change.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Sayfan G. Borghini: Designing Social Environments

12th ECCO/GBI Seminar Series (2015-2016) Topic: Designing Social Environments (seminar + discussion) Speaker: Sayfan G. Borghini (HIT, Israel) November 27, 2...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Xaos
Scoop.it!

Ibn al-Haytham – The First Scientist

Ibn al-Haytham – The First Scientist | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Today’s textbooks speak of Newton, Galileo, and Einstein, but ignore the man who inspired them. Without Ibn al-Haytham, science as we know it would not exist.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Xaos from cognition
Scoop.it!

Home | History of Philosophy without any gaps

Home | History of Philosophy without any gaps | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Peter Adamson, Professor of Philosophy at the LMU in Munich and at King's College London, takes listeners through the history of philosophy, "without any gaps."

Via Wildcat2030, FastTFriend
more...
Berta Civera's curator insight, September 28, 2015 3:03 AM

Historia de la Filosofía de Peter Adamson, en inglés