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Tim Berners-Lee on PhiloWeb and Philosophical engineering.

interview avec Tim Berners-Lee en marge de la séance plénière de TPAC 2010 

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Wisdom 1.0
Assemblage of Substantial Assets Towards Wisdom Version 1.0
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Consciousness: An Object Lesson

Consciousness: An Object Lesson | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Manzotti: Perhaps it’s time to ditch the word “consciousness” and simply talk about experience....Your body is such a thing and when your body is there, an apple is there, too. Not an apple reproduced like a photo in your head. An apple there on the table, in relation with your body.

Parks: So, anything the body experiences as an effect—which is to say, anything it experiences—is an object?
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Vitalik Buterin explains Ethereum in his own words at Disrupt SF

Vitalik Buterin explains Ethereum in his own words at Disrupt SF | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Today at Disrupt SF 2017 Vitalik Buterin sat down with AngelList founder Naval Ravikant to talk Ethereum. Because, well, Vitalik created Ethereum. Up front,..
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Ephemeralization - Doing more with less - Buckminster Fuller (animated clip)

This clip is a short but powerful animated story about using design to create sustainable wealth, and it provides essential insights into the future o
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Why being aware of your mortality can be good for you

Why being aware of your mortality can be good for you | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Nobody likes to think about lying on their death bed. From health anxiety to midlife crises, it seems like thoughts about ageing and death can often unleash some level of neurosis. But is that the whole story? We have examined mortality awareness – the realisation that we are all one day going to die – and found that, although the prospect of death is often scary, it can also have positive effects.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, research on death awareness so far has focused largely on the negative aspects of realising that we will eventually stop living. Indeed, until now, the dominant psychological theory has been “terror management theory”, which assumes that contemplating our demise invokes fear and anxiety. For example, studies using this framework have found that thinking about death can make us more punitive and prejudiced.

However, throughout the years, literature from various fields has offered other explanations. For example, “positive psychology” proposes concepts such as “post-traumatic growth” – the idea that people can grow psychologically through traumatic experiences. Thinking about the fact that we will die may be hard, but according to this theory it could also help us to get stronger psychologically.

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The philosophy of Stoicism - Massimo Pigliucci

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-philosophy-of-stoicism-massimo-pigliucci What is the best life we can live? How can we cope with whateve
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Roger Penrose On Why Consciousness Does Not Compute - Issue 47: Consciousness - Nautilus

Roger Penrose On Why Consciousness Does Not Compute - Issue 47: Consciousness - Nautilus | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Once you start poking around in the muck of consciousness studies, you will soon encounter the specter of Sir Roger Penrose, the renowned…
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Descartes was wrong: ‘a person is a person through other persons’ – Abeba Birhane | Aeon Ideas

Descartes was wrong: ‘a person is a person through other persons’ – Abeba Birhane | Aeon Ideas | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
According to Ubuntu philosophy, which has its origins in ancient Africa, a newborn baby is not a person. People are born without ‘ena’, or selfhood, and instead must acquire it through interactions and experiences over time. So the ‘self’/‘other
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How many great minds does it take to invent a telescope? – Thony Christie | Aeon Ideas

How many great minds does it take to invent a telescope? – Thony Christie | Aeon Ideas | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
On 11 January 1672, the Fellows of the British Royal Society were treated to a demonstration of Isaac Newton’s reflecting telescope, which formed images with mirrors rather than with the lenses that had been used since the time of Galileo
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Tom Hurka Interview on Bernard Suits's The Grasshopper

Tom Hurka Interview on Bernard Suits's The Grasshopper | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Tom: Actually, Suits is careful to distinguish game-playing from play. The first is an activity that fits his definition, with the goal, rules, and so on, and the second is any activity chosen for its
own sake. So there can be game-playing that isn't play (if you play, say, football only to make money) and play that isn't game-playing (like a kitten's playing with wool). And the value his
book defends is primarily that of game-playing, though in his utopia, where people don't need things like money, the game-playing will also always be play.

Now I think Suits exaggerates the value of game-playing when he says it's the supreme good, and he does so because he's tacitly built into his utopia other things that are comparably
good, such as pleasure and knowledge. Still, his claim that game-playing instantiates one important good, and in fact is the paradigm expression of that good, is a wonderful insight.

In game-playing you aim at a goal that's in itself completely trivial: that a ball go into a hole in the ground, that you cross a line on the track before anyone else does, that you stand atop a mountain. But the rules of the game make achieving that goal complex and difficult, and it's that difficulty that gives the activity its value. To play the game you have to aim at a trivial goal, and you haven't succeeded in the game unless you achieve the goal, but the value of the activity is independent of the value of the goal. That's why I say game-playing is the paradigm expression of modern values, because what those values emphasize is process not product, journey not destination. And there's the big contrast with someone like Aristotle, who said that if an activity produces a goal outside itself, the activity has to have less value than the goal does. Not true! That a ball go into a hole in the ground is completely trivial. That Tiger Woods can make it do so from 562 yards away in four shots is tremendously valuable.
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Neil Gaiman: Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming

Neil Gaiman: Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
A lecture explaining why using our imaginations, and providing for others to use theirs, is an obligation for all citizens
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FastTFriend's curator insight, March 27, 2:30 AM
We all – adults and children, writers and readers – have an obligation to daydream. We have an obligation to imagine. It is easy to pretend that nobody can change anything, that we are in a world in which society is huge and the individual is less than nothing: an atom in a wall, a grain of rice in a rice field. But the truth is, individuals change their world over and over, individuals make the future, and they do it by imagining that things can be different.
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Why Foucault's work on power is more important than ever – Colin Koopman | Aeon Essays

Why Foucault's work on power is more important than ever – Colin Koopman | Aeon Essays | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Original, painstaking, sometimes frustrating and often dazzling. Foucault’s work on power matters now more than ever
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Like start-ups, most intentional communities fail – why? – Alexa Clay | Aeon Essays

Like start-ups, most intentional communities fail – why? – Alexa Clay | Aeon Essays | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Most utopian communities are, like most start-ups, short-lived. What makes the difference between failure and success?
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Does self-marriage challenge romantic ideals or just cave to them? – Polina Aronson | Aeon Essays

Does self-marriage challenge romantic ideals or just cave to them? – Polina Aronson | Aeon Essays | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
This summer I got married for the second time. Unlike my first wedding, in a town hall 11 years ago, this one was strictly informal. The ceremony took place at the Karaoke Pit in Berlin’s Mauerpark, a dilapidated concrete amphitheatre in the middle of the former no-man’s land between East and West Berlin. There were some 500 guests in attendance, most of whom I’d never met before and would never see again. My dress was black and I kept my sunglasses on. There were no bridesmaids, no public registrar, let alone a priest or rabbi, and no papers were issued at the end. Moreover, there was no bridegroom: I was, as it happened, getting married to my own self – with my husband and our two children watching from the front row.

I formalised my vows with karaoke, offering a musical and performative statement of intent in front of the assembled (and mostly unwitting) witnesses. This improbable 4.5-minute ceremony was the way I capped off a 10-week online course on self-marriage, which I took this spring. I was motivated three-quarters by what C W Mills in 1959 called the ‘sociological imagination’ – the capacity to discern the link between our everyday experience and wider society – and one-quarter by unbridled curiosity about the intricate workings of modern love.
‘Sologamy’ is the latest relationship trend not only in Europe and the United States but also Japan. A budding industry of self-marriages promises to make us happier by celebrating commitment to the only person in this world truly worthy of a relationship investment: our precious self. A variety of coaches worldwide offer self-marriage courses, including guidance through preparatory steps (such as writing love poems and composing vows) and orchestration of the ceremony itself.

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Imagination is such an ancient ability it might precede language – Stephen T Asma | Aeon Essays

Imagination is such an ancient ability it might precede language – Stephen T Asma | Aeon Essays | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Our imaginative life today has access to the pre-linguistic, ancestral mind: rich in imagery, emotions and associations
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Online social change: easy to organize, hard to win

Online social change: easy to organize, hard to win | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Today, a single email can launch a worldwide movement. But as sociologist Zeynep Tufekci suggests, even though online activism is easy to grow, it often doesn't last. Why? She compares modern movements -- Gezi, Ukraine, Hong Kong -- to the civil rights movement of the 1960s, and uncovers a surprising benefit of organizing protest movements the way it happened before Twitter.
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The revolutionary figure of the beautiful, self-improved soul – Justine Kolata | Aeon Ideas

The revolutionary figure of the beautiful, self-improved soul – Justine Kolata | Aeon Ideas | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
In a global culture that appears increasingly obsessed with radical individualism, narcissistic presentations of self, and incendiary political rhetoric, it is hard to imagine that society once cared about the beauty of the soul. But, in the lat
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Mental Models: The Best Way to Make Intelligent Decisions (113 Models Explained)

Mental Models: The Best Way to Make Intelligent Decisions (113 Models Explained) | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
The smartest people in the world use mental models to solve difficult problems, avoid stupidity, increase productivity, and free up time.
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Are human rights anything more than legal conventions? – John Tasioulas | Aeon Ideas

Are human rights anything more than legal conventions? – John Tasioulas | Aeon Ideas | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
We live in an age of human rights. The language of human rights has become ubiquitous, a lingua franca used for expressing the most basic demands of justice. Some are old demands, such as the prohibition of torture and slavery. Others are newer, such as claims to internet access or same-sex marriage. But what are human rights, and where do they come from? This question is made urgent by a disquieting thought. Perhaps people with clashing values and convictions can so easily appeal to ‘human rights’ only because, ultimately, they don’t agree on what they are talking about? Maybe the apparently widespread consensus on the significance of human rights depends on the emptiness of that very notion? If this is true, then talk of human rights is rhetorical window-dressing, masking deeper ethical and political divisions.

Philosophers have debated the nature of human rights since at least the 12th century, often under the name of ‘natural rights’. These natural rights were supposed to be possessed by everyone and discoverable with the aid of our ordinary powers of reason (our ‘natural reason’), as opposed to rights established by law or disclosed through divine revelation. Wherever there are philosophers, however, there is disagreement. Belief in human rights left open how we go about making the case for them – are they, for example, protections of human needs generally or only of freedom of choice? There were also disagreements about the correct list of human rights – should it include socio-economic rights, like the rights to health or work, in addition to civil and political rights, such as the rights to a fair trial and political participation?

But many now argue that we should set aside philosophical wrangles over the nature and origins of human rights. In the 21st century, they contend, human rights exist not in the nebulous ether of philosophical speculation, but in the black letter of law. Human rights are those laid down in The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) and the various international and domestic laws that implement it. Some who adopt this line of thought might even invoke the 18th-century English philosopher Jeremy Bentham, who contemptuously dismissed the idea of natural rights existing independently of human-made laws as ‘rhetorical nonsense – nonsense upon stilts’.

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Why God knows more about misbehaviour than anything else – Benjamin Grant Purzycki | Aeon Essays

Why God knows more about misbehaviour than anything else – Benjamin Grant Purzycki | Aeon Essays | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
Punitive Big Brother; cosmic petty-thief-catcher; vigilant landlord. Why is God so interested in bad behaviour?
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Silicon Valley Would Rather Cure Death Than Make Life Worth Living

Silicon Valley Would Rather Cure Death Than Make Life Worth Living | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
While Silicon Valley titans are drunk on the transhumanist promise to cure death, people are dying of curable problems that technologists ignore.
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Jeong Kwan, the Philosopher Chef

Jeong Kwan, the Philosopher Chef | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
The most exquisite food in the world, say many celebrated chefs, is being made not in Copenhagen or New York, but in a remote temple complex south of Seoul by a 59-year-old Buddhist nun.
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Materialism alone cannot explain the riddle of consciousness – Adam Frank | Aeon Essays

Materialism alone cannot explain the riddle of consciousness – Adam Frank | Aeon Essays | Wisdom 1.0 | Scoop.it
The closer you look, the more the materialist position in physics appears to rest on shaky metaphysical ground
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