The Neuro Coach
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The Neuro Coach
Learn more about your amazing brain and how you can continue to rewire it throughout your life.
Curated by Ian Banyard
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Welcome to Wired4Success

Welcome to Wired4Success | The Neuro Coach | Scoop.it

Whether you are a business owner, manager, trainer, coach, parent, teacher, or someone curious to learn more about developing your brain, “Wired4Success” has something for you all. I have set up this online magazine to help you access leading-edge information about your brain and how you can start to rewire it for more success in your life. The best way to start is by taking my simple brain quiz and find out how your brain is wired. Once you have a better idea of how your brain works read the articles and watch videos to learn more. I will also be regularly posting information to help you start rewiring your brain so make sure you click 'follow' to ensure you keep up to date. Have fun exploring this site and leave questions and comments if you have something to say or want to ask any questions, my advice is always FREE!

 

Ian Banyard

 

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How the Brain Infects Reality!

How the Brain Infects Reality! | The Neuro Coach | Scoop.it
There is no elephant here! It's just your brain projecting what you already know into a unique experience. Read more about your amazing brain here: http://www.ianbanyard.com/home/your-amazing-brain
Ian Banyard's insight:
A great example of how we misuse our creativity by projecting what we already know and like into a brand new experience. We literally infect new experiences with our own perception of the world.
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Why Your Brain Needs Nature! | Ian Banyard

Why Your Brain Needs Nature! | Ian Banyard | The Neuro Coach | Scoop.it
Research on naps, meditation, nature walks and the habits of exceptional artists and athletes reveals how mental breaks increase productivity, replenish attention, solidify memories and encourage creativity
Ian Banyard's insight:
Nature is good for the brain.
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3 of the Most Exciting Discoveries in Brain Science

3 of the Most Exciting Discoveries in Brain Science | The Neuro Coach | Scoop.it

1. Neuroplasticity, 2. Mindfulness, 3. The Social Brain

Looking back we might see that one of the great tragedies of our time is that we significantly underestimate our capacity to grow and change. We don’t really try at all, or we give up after a few days or weeks because we don’t see immediate results. Brain science has proven over and over again that mind training can change the brain so we can literally learn to sculpt the brain in order to live our lives to the fullest. Like everything worth doing we need to start with curiosity, learn and then practice. (View original source for more details).

Ian Banyard's insight:

We have probably learned more about the brain in the past 20 years than in all recorded history….

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The Intuitive Brain

The Intuitive Brain | The Neuro Coach | Scoop.it
Researchers at the Institute of Learning & Brain Sciences at the University of Washington have discovered something that may surprise many parents. Click the title to view original post and watch the video.
Ian Banyard's insight:
Toddlers are more intuitive than we may think, and spend time “regulating” their behavior to get the best outcome to certain situations, and depending on the emotional cues of the adults around them.
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Brain Rules - The Performance Envelope

Out brain is the most advanced survival tool in the universe. Don't take my word for it here 'a John Medina.
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The Gatherer Brain (Emotional)

The Gatherer Brain (Emotional) | The Neuro Coach | Scoop.it

Driven by an emotional need to be accepted and loved by others means that people with a strong Gatherer Brain have high levels of empathy and tend to put the needs of others ahead of their own.

 

Our Gatherer ancestors were those who could adapt themselves to fit into groups and societies. Unlike Hunters who were self-sufficient, Gatherers needed the security from large family groups and tribes to survive. In today’s world they are the team players, nurses and teachers who use their ability to co-operate, compromise and care for others to feel like they belong.

 

If you find yourself running around trying to help everyone else sort there lives out neglecting your own needs and goals for fear of being seen as selfish, you've probably got a strongly wired Gatherer Brain.

 

To learn more about your brain visit the original source by clicking the title link above.

Ian Banyard's insight:

How many self-help books do we need to read, workshops do we need to attend and speakers do we need to listen to, to realise that the truly successful people in life, (those who create, enjoy, share and benefit from wonderful experiences) are just wired differently.

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The Hunter Brain | Ian Banyard

The Hunter Brain | Ian Banyard | The Neuro Coach | Scoop.it
The Hunter is your instinctive Brain. Driven by a need to survive your Hunter is always on the look out for risks and opportunities. If you score highly in this area of my brain tests it means you tend to be focussed on your needs and action-orientated. Our Hunter ancestors were the strongest, fastest and those that instinctively connected and adapted to their natural environment. In today’s world they are the courageous, dominant, driving people we often think of as ‘natural leaders.’ They are not shy or usually modest. They have a highly competitive nature, are challenge-oriented, extremely focussed and decisive. The Hunter is driven by an inner need to be in charge and win.
Ian Banyard's insight:
Click the title to read more about your Hunter Brain and take my brain test.
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How to Rewire Your Brain for Success

The latest neuroscience suggests you can literally edit your memory. Here's what this big breakthrough means for you.
Ian Banyard's insight:
Interesting how neuroscience is confirming what Bandler was teaching in NLP trainings in the 70s 80s and 90s when the mainstream were poo-pooing it!
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The Science of Mindfulness | Ian Banyard

The Science of Mindfulness | Ian Banyard | The Neuro Coach | Scoop.it
Studies show that if we practice internal focus of attention using mindfulness we can actually rewire and change our brain. There is a new area of brain science called Neuroplasticity—how the brain changes itself in response to our experiences – both real and imagined. Click title to read more.
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How to Rewire Your Brain Naturally?

How to Rewire Your Brain Naturally? | The Neuro Coach | Scoop.it
Ian Banyard's insight:

People often compare the brain to a computer, but there is an important difference. A computer’s hardware doesn't change, but the size and structure of the neurons and the connections between them in your brain actually change as you learn 

So, one of the simplest ways to rewire your brain is to keep on learning.

 

What I mean by learning is exposing yourself to new experiences. In addition to book learning, the best way is to try out new activities like traveling, learning to play a musical instrument, speak a foreign language, or participating in social and community activities like “Fresh Air Fridays”


Another way is doing brain aerobics like. Something as simple as searching for famous people whose first names begin with the letter A, doing crossword puzzles or playing board games that get you thinking.

 

If you want to go even further click the title above!

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The Subconscious Brain - Who's Minding the Mind? - New York Times

The Subconscious Brain - Who's Minding the Mind? - New York Times | The Neuro Coach | Scoop.it
The subconscious brain is more active, independent and purposeful than once thought. Sometimes it takes charge.
Ian Banyard's insight:
So manipulation only works if we don't know we're being manipulated!
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Healthy Diet and Lifestyle Choices May Actually Re-Program Your Brain, According to a New Study

Healthy Diet and Lifestyle Choices May Actually Re-Program Your Brain, According to a New Study | The Neuro Coach | Scoop.it
To examine whether it is possible to break unhealthy food addiction patterns in the brain, a Tufts University research team employed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scans to study the brain’s reward centers in 13 overweight and obese men and women. Eight of the study members participated in a six month weight loss program “specifically designed to change how people react to certain foods,” incorporating several features like behavioral weight management education and high-fiber, low-glycemic menu plans, recipe suggestions and tip sheets. Five of the study participants served as the control group and did not receive any weight loss programming. All participants underwent MRI scans at the start of the study and at the end of its six-month duration. During the scans they were shown pictures of high calorie foods, low calorie foods, and non-food control images. After six months of weight loss programming, the reward center of the brain had changed significantly in the experimental group, specifically in the areas associated with learning and addiction. The researchers also noted an increased sensitivity to the images of healthier foods, and a decreased sensitivity to the images of higher calorie foods. As expected, the participants in the experimental group also lost significantly more weight than those in the control group. These preliminary findings indicate that our brain’s food addiction pathways are not set in stone, but are flexible through changes in mindful eating and increased food education. Certainly more research needs to be conducted with a larger number of participants, an increased follow-up duration and deeper investigation into the causal mechanisms of change. Furthermore, if lifestyle changes and education can alter the brain’s reaction to food, can similar targeted interventions also alter the brain’s reactions to other addictive triggers like drugs, alcohol and gambling?
Ian Banyard's insight:
Perhaps it is no surprise that scientists have finally demonstrated what many of us have already intuitively discovered… By making conscious lifestyle choices, it is possible to ‘train’ your brain to crave healthy foods instead of junk foods!
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Brain Pathway Rediscovered After 100 Years | IFLScience

Brain Pathway Rediscovered After 100 Years | IFLScience | The Neuro Coach | Scoop.it
Modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are giving scientists unprecedented insight into the inner workings of the human brain.
Ian Banyard's insight:
Missing "vertical pathway" link found after 100 years!!
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Inside the mind of a killer whale: A Q+A with the neuroscientist from 'Blackfish'

Inside the mind of a killer whale: A Q+A with the neuroscientist from 'Blackfish' | The Neuro Coach | Scoop.it
How do whale and dolphin brains really stack up against our own? Emory University's Lori Marino has the answers.
Ian Banyard's insight:
There is an amazing emotional development in the brains of whales learn more by following this link.
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Ruby Wax: Sane New World - YouTube

A woman who surely needs no introduction (but still gets one), Ruby Wax has had a stellar career. Whether performing standup, being a charity ambassador, or ...
Ian Banyard's insight:
I experienced my mum go through similar experiences to Ruby Wax in the 60/70s she also taught us to see the humour in it and inspired me to study rewiring the brain. Ruby Wax: Sane New World A woman who surely needs no introduction (but still gets one), Ruby Wax has had a stellar career. Whether...
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How Walking Improves Your Brain | Ian Banyard

How Walking Improves Your Brain | Ian Banyard | The Neuro Coach | Scoop.it

Walking benefits your brain power, improves your mood and helps to ward off depression, and think more clearly. Walking, increases the blood flow to the brain. A 1999 study of people over age 60 found that walking 45 minutes a day at a 16-minute mile pace improved thinking skills. The participants started at 15 minutes of walking and built up their time and speed. The result was that the same people were mentally sharper after taking up this walking program.

 

A study published in September 2008 found improved memory scores and reduced dementia scores in people with mild cognitive impairment who were part of a 24-week home-based exercise program. The participants used walking as their chosen exercise and were encouraged to walk for 50 minutes, three times a week.
Walking energises the brain by switching off the default mode network. This is the part of your brain involved in self-referencing and episodic memory. In other words we give our brain a rest from thinking and analysing all the thoughts and feelings going on in our busy and often stressful lives.

Walking starts to attune us into the surroundings in a more relaxed way. It changes the frames of reference we have to ourselves and our lives giving us a different more creative and sometimes spiritual perspective.

 

Click the I am Ian Banyard and I run Life Guiding Walks in the Cotswolds designed to help you tap into the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual health benefits of walking mindfully in nature.

 

If you would like to learn more and try this out for yourself,  join us on our next “Fresh Air Friday Walk”- visit the original source.

Ian Banyard's insight:

Walking gives you an important mental break from your normal distractions and preoccupations and stimulates creativity and heightened awareness.

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Stop Looking For 'Hardwired' Differences In Male And Female Brains

Stop Looking For 'Hardwired' Differences In Male And Female Brains | The Neuro Coach | Scoop.it
In December, a highly publicized study declared that distinctive wiring in the brain explains different skill sets in men and women. After scanning hundreds of participants’ brains, the researchers reported that men have stronger connections within a given hemisphere, whereas women have stronger connections between the two. This makes sense, they speculated, because same-side connections are responsible for carrying out focused tasks, such as map reading, at which men excel, whereas cross-brain connections underlie the multitasking and social graces that are most often associated with women. Finally, evidence that men are from Mars and women are from Venus! The trouble is, the study is riddled with faulty assumptions and methodological flaws. Worse still, problems like these taint just about every study that claims to show a “hardwired” explanation for why men and women behave differently. Click the header to read more...
Ian Banyard's insight:
In other words stop wasting your money on those books about why men can't iron and women can't reverse park!
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How brain science can change coaching

How brain science can change coaching | The Neuro Coach | Scoop.it
Brain science research has significant implications for the coaching profession.
Ian Banyard's insight:
They'll be suggesting teachers learn how the brain works next!
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Neuroscientists Make Huge Strides Toward Solving the Mysteries of the Teenage Brain | Big Think

Neuroscientists Make Huge Strides Toward Solving the Mysteries of the Teenage Brain | Big Think | The Neuro Coach | Scoop.it
Neuroscientists fascinated by the teenage psyche have come together to publish a series of studies on what makes juveniles tick. Their findings reveal why teenage boys in particular act in such a risk-averse manner.
Ian Banyard's insight:
Neuroscience solving the mysteries of the teenage brain.
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What Kids Should Know About Their Own Brains

What Kids Should Know About Their Own Brains | The Neuro Coach | Scoop.it
In a well-known body of research, Stanford University psychologist Carol Dweck has demonstrated that teaching students about how their brains work—in particular, that the brain is plastic and can develop new capacities with effort and practice—makes a big difference in how constructively kids deal with mistakes and setbacks, and how motivated they are to persist until they achieve mastery.
Ian Banyard's insight:
If kids know their brain has plasticity it will open up limitless potential.
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The Hunter Brain | Ian Banyard

The Hunter Brain | Ian Banyard | The Neuro Coach | Scoop.it

Driven by a need to survive your Hunter is always on the look out for risks and opportunities.  If you score highly in this area of my brain tests it means you tend to be focussed on your needs and action-orientated. Our Hunter ancestors were the strongest, fastest and those that instinctively connected and adapted to their natural  environment. In today’s world they are the courageous, dominant, driving people we often think of as ‘natural leaders.’ They are not shy or usually modest. They have a highly competitive nature, are challenge-oriented, extremely focussed and decisive. The Hunter is driven by an inner need to be in charge and win.

Ian Banyard's insight:

Are you in charge of your Hunter Brain or is it controlling you?

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Raise a glass! Drink doesn't kill off brain cells

Raise a glass! Drink doesn't kill off brain cells | The Neuro Coach | Scoop.it
While researchers continue to demystify the workings of the brain, many myths persist about its structure and function.
Ian Banyard's insight:
Sorting out myth from fact!
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Mindfulness for Business | Ian Banyard

Mindfulness for Business | Ian Banyard | The Neuro Coach | Scoop.it
Ian Banyard's insight:

Did you know that spending time in nature can help you deal more effectively with workplace stress and jump-start your brain for success? There is a growing body of research that shows time in nature prepares the brain for optimal functioning. Time in nature also helps to tap into the things we are passion about, develop a sense of purpose and increase productivity. 

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The Plastic Brain (full animation)

The Plastic Brain (full animation) | The Neuro Coach | Scoop.it
Now we can see how practice boosts learning and overcomes inhibitors.
Ian Banyard's insight:
How practice stimulates brain growth!
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