WinMax Negotiations
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Communicating Trajectory: The Importance of Knowing Where We Are Going | Switch and Shift

Communicating Trajectory: The Importance of Knowing Where We Are Going | Switch and Shift | WinMax Negotiations | Scoop.it

fritzmt And so it goes with organizations striving to progress from the “As Is” to the “To Be". Struggling to align the goal with the motivation, the vision to the reality. Herein lies the true value of communication, ensuring each teammate shares the experience of knowing where they are going. In Leadership from A to Z, James O’Toole shared that you, as the leader, must “…communicate clearly and repeatedly the organization’s vision…all with the intent of helping every person involved understand what work needs to be done and why, and what part the individual plays in the overall effort.” As the leader, you hold the cue-card and are artist-in-charge of painting a vivid picture that both inspires and clarifies the destination. Here are some simple tips to ensure you keep the destination in clear view:

Chris R Stricklin's insight:

You can never underestimate the power of course corrections. No journey is ever on autopilot!

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Navy Dad Surprises Daughter At Cheer Practice

Navy Dad Surprises Daughter At Cheer Practice | WinMax Negotiations | Scoop.it
Will Smith, a navy fire control man, gave his daughter the surprise of a lifetime during her cheer practice.
Chris R Stricklin's insight:

GO MILITARY DADS EVERYWHERE!!! 

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Innovation is Inspiration: Lead in your Surroundings | Switch and Shift

Innovation is Inspiration: Lead in your Surroundings | Switch and Shift | WinMax Negotiations | Scoop.it
As we approach President's day, it seems fitting to honor two wonderful examples of innovation: our first American President, George Washington and our 16th, Abraham Lincoln. Both men were students of their environment--continually examining their surroundings and identifying niches to fill.
Chris R Stricklin's insight:

? Everything: "Leadership through ongoing innovative thought is a key to growth and success in life... Start with a new approach...You don’t need to solve World Peace right now."

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Dan Biles's curator insight, February 16, 2014 10:44 AM
"Some changes need to be explored and adapted to fit evolving circumstances. All ideas contribute, but not every idea will bear fruit right away."
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Frustrated by an Uninformed Negotiator? Consider Your BATNA

Frustrated by an Uninformed Negotiator? Consider Your BATNA | WinMax Negotiations | Scoop.it
As the lead negotiator in 18 months of top-secret talks with Iran over its nuclear program, U.S. State Department Under Secretary for Political Affair
Chris R Stricklin's insight:

Entering a negotiation without a clear BATNA is like walking into Combat without Body Armor!

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Thank You For Your Service (My Proudest Guest Post Ever!) - Blog - Mills-Scofield LLC - Innovanomics, strategic alignment for innovation

Thank You For Your Service (My Proudest Guest Post Ever!) - Blog - Mills-Scofield LLC - Innovanomics, strategic alignment for innovation | WinMax Negotiations | Scoop.it
This is one of most honored posts I've ever ever hosted. Lt. Col. Matthew Fritz is Director, Co...
Chris R Stricklin's insight:

 Words can not explain the true feelings packages evoke in deployed members, But Matthew does an incredible job of portraying how much they mean!

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Followership: the Corollary to Leadership

Followership: the Corollary to Leadership | WinMax Negotiations | Scoop.it

The world is focused on creating good leaders, but often overlooking an equally important factor: educating great followers. 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, John Michel
Chris R Stricklin's insight:

"Followership, like leadership, is a role and not a destination."

—    Michael McKinney

 

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's comment, June 27, 2013 10:37 AM
Read this related blog post by Val Van Brocklin: Is 'great followership' the real secret to great leadership? (http://www.policeone.com/chiefs-sheriffs/articles/6283412-Is-great-followership-the-real-secret-to-great-leadership) + my article with Barbara Kellerman: http://sco.lt/79q6cr.
Angie Mc's curator insight, June 27, 2013 11:37 AM

The "followership" principles can be applied to the family dynamic, supporting each member to see their individual value as contributing to the betterment of the whole.

John Michel's curator insight, June 28, 2013 12:12 AM

Great leaders will not guarantee an optimal organization, but great followers will come close.  The best organizational leaders will come from the ranks of the followers.  Therefore, focus on creating great followers and great leaders will emerge.

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Positive Change: Yesterday Is Interesting But Irrelevant - General Leadership

Positive Change: Yesterday Is Interesting But Irrelevant - General Leadership | WinMax Negotiations | Scoop.it

Yesterday is interesting but irrelevant. This simple phrase defines a strategy to spark exponential growth and efficiency in any organization. For me, it was the opening line of my first speech as a new Air Force Fighter Squadron commander. It encompasses a mentality of limitless positive change and endless possibility.

Chris R Stricklin's insight:

If a change initiative doesn’t meet one of the four rules, don’t do it. Always remember yesterday may have brought you to today, but it most likely will not carry you through tomorrow. Embrace new ideas, new methods and always question the assumptions which define your business model. “Yesterday is interesting but irrelevant” must be an essential concept of employment.

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Matthew Fritz's curator insight, February 7, 2014 12:13 PM

One should always include maximum flexibility into change management plans--and focus on the benefits inherent in future strategic planning.  The past is full of good lessons, but the future is where the focus should be!

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Love in bloom

Love in bloom | WinMax Negotiations | Scoop.it
The sign said "One Dozen Roses -- Only $6 for Valentine's Day Delivery." What was an 11-year-old to think?
Chris R Stricklin's insight:

It is amazing what simple stories bring tears to your eyes when you are 8,000 miles from your family. Having just experienced another long distance Valentine... I picture my kids and my wife in this one... Thank you Terri for putting the little/big events we experience in our military lives in print!

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How Trust Became the Currency of Business

How Trust Became the Currency of Business | WinMax Negotiations | Scoop.it
Confidence, a way of expressing competence, lends itself more readily to business discussions because it is measurable. Confidence can be objectively assessed and quantified.
Chris R Stricklin's insight:

Whether Leadership or Business...Confidence, Trust, honesty and integrity are key.

 

"Confidence is actually a subset of trust. It refers to a person's competency or ability to perform a task. The other dimension of trust is morally-based; it means a person won't deceive us. When we say a person is trustworthy, we're usually referring to this dimension of trust and expressing our belief in that person's honesty and integrity."

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Dynamic Followership: The Secret to Leadership - Business Matters

Dynamic Followership: The Secret to Leadership - Business Matters | WinMax Negotiations | Scoop.it
Leadership, like followership, is a continual journey through actions and growth, not merely a journey’s end for a CV. This leadership development conundrum has always been a puzzle.
Chris R Stricklin's insight:

Dynamic Followers, simply, are followers who take charge of both their personal and professional development, ensure complete competency at their primary duty, actively manage their relationships and exercise independent thought with both professional restraint and respect. 

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9 Good Signs You’re in the Right Relationship

9 Good Signs You’re in the Right Relationship | WinMax Negotiations | Scoop.it
Practical Tips for Productive Living

Via John Michel
Chris R Stricklin's insight:

This says it all...

"And remember, relationships are rarely 50/50 at any given instant in time.  You can’t always feel 100%, or a full 50% of a relationship’s whole – life is simply too unpredictable for that.  So on the days when you can only give 20%, the other person must give 80%, and vice versa.  It’s never been about balancing steady in the middle; healthy relationships are about two people who are willing to make adjustments for each other in real time as needed, and give more when the other person can’t help but give a little less."

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Wit and Wisdom | Chesterton House

Wit and Wisdom | Chesterton House | WinMax Negotiations | Scoop.it
Chris R Stricklin's insight:

We are all searching for proverbs to explain our life, leadership, followership or whatever skill we are trying to develop. Twitter   is the epitome of the continual quest for 140-character proverb that will go viral. Ryan explains "they are creative sayings that pass along time-tested advice – the wisdom of many in the wit of one,” and he takes us back to where proverbs began. 

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Mind the Gap

Mind the Gap | WinMax Negotiations | Scoop.it

Why are purchasers and suppliers so often disappointed by the results of strategic sourcing, and how can they stop the value leaking out of hard-won contracts?.....

 

Collaborative Approach

 

Procurement organisations that employed a collaborative (versus an adversarial) approach to negotiations reported greater satisfaction with their negotiated agreements and the value realised from those agreements. Of the top 10 per cent of buy-side study participants in terms of self-reported value realised during contract implementation, 63 percent described their negotiations as “highly” or “somewhat” collaborative.

Those employing a collaborative negotiation approach reported more positive working relations with suppliers, fewer unexpected problems during contract implementation, and a far greater ability to work through problems. Figure 2 shows the correlation between how study participants characterised the nature of negotiations with their suppliers and their subjective level of satisfaction with value delivered by suppliers for the contract.

Interviews with high performers revealed an ability to negotiate assertively and collaboratively (both in the sense of treating individual counterparts with a high degree of respect and seeking mutually beneficial solutions) at the same time. Average and low-performers overwhelmingly perceive a debilitating zero-sum trade-off between assertiveness and being collaborative. Similarly, top-performing procurement organisations balance the use of competitive sourcing and bidding with negotiation strategies and approaches that are highly collaborative (focused on fair and sustainable outcomes for both sides and with an emphasis on joint development of creative and mutually beneficial solutions.)....

 

 

 


Via Ricard Lloria
Chris R Stricklin's insight:

Key to success is the ability to balance a competitive drive with the need to collaborate with your competition..."high performers revealed an ability to negotiate assertively and collaboratively" 

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Eli Levine's curator insight, February 11, 2014 3:17 PM

I remember doing a mock negotiation for a Strategy and Negotiation class I took in the Netherlands.  It was between a teacher's union and the Board of Education and I, contrary to all my preferences and upbringing, was put on the side of the Board of Ed.  I ended up being the chief negotiator and it was my strategy that we used to handle the negotiations.

 

We started off from the premise that we wanted to compensate and work with our teachers (who were, for all intents and purposes, our employees) rather than try to work against them.  The result was that both sides were able to get basically what we wanted.  The only sticking point was that I was trying to have the numbers be run first before we promise them a raise total, while they wanted the raise total up front.  By being basically honest, and dogged to the amount of spending that was given to us by the Town Council while trying to give our workers as much as we could have given them within those bounds proved, I think, to have been significantly more fruitful than if we were competing with each other.

 

Competition is sometimes a great way to find the best possible solution to design problems, specifically.  It is through the threshing out of garbage from value that you get designs which work.  However, if you're working towards solving common problems, or if you're working with other people on a more social, less combative level, collaboration has to be at the root of your endeavors, otherwise, the whole thing will fall apart as you tear the issues apart and/or ruin the relationships that have to be maintained for good function.

 

Think about it.