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The First Wine I Ever Hated: Lacrima di Morro d’Alba

The First Wine I Ever Hated: Lacrima di Morro d’Alba | Wines and People | Scoop.it
I remember the first wine I actively DESPISED. This wine made me heartily want to puke. I could not get it away from me; the sticky-spicy scent of a closet littered with potpourri satchels hung in my nostrils, pervading my sinuses, clinging like your great aunt’s perfume after a lingering hug—strong and alarmingly persistent.
The wine was a red Lacrima di Morro d’Alba. [...]
Perhaps in 2005, my virgin palate was shallow, ignorant, and uncouth! Perhaps my uneducated tongue was simply too immature to recognize Lacrima di Morro d’Alba’s charm.
…Fast forward to right now: I open the 2009 Luigi Giusti Lacrima di Morro d’Alba. I swirl. I sniff. That piquant scent absolutely leaps out of the glass. It clings tenaciously to my nostrils and my tongue, just like auntie’s perfume, just like I remembered it. As the dear Sam, who sold me this bottle at Biondivino, said: “It’s a polarizing wine. You either love it or you hate it.”
I give it a chance to open up [...]
In Wine Grapes, Jancis explains, “the name Lacrima (English ‘teardrop’) was probably given to this variety because when the berries are fully ripe, they exude small drops of juice.”
To my taste, the grapes may as well have exuded thousands of tiny potpourri satchels, because the wine smells as if someone steeped these satchels in the fermenting juice: there’s dried roses, lilies, violets, lavender, juniper, what I think myrtle berries must smell like, plus cinnamon sticks and allspice—the whole shebang in there.
A wine this strong could get scary without a kick of acid to lift it up and carry it along, but once you get past the freaky-potent aromatics, the wine lights up with a great streak of acidity. The tannins are mellow but not absent, giving it a soft texture, cruising along in stride with black pepper, Red Hots, and star anise. The whole thing finishes with a slathering of blackberry jam bringing up the rear. As I sip, I have a sudden craving for lamb chops sprinkled with sea salt, rosemary, maybe a little balsamic reduction. Or, moussaka… or, hey… Maybe Linguine Mare Chiaro, bella.

2009 Luigi Giusti Lacrima di Morro d’Alba (Marche, Italy)
The Grape: Lacrima di Morro d’Alba
The Region: Marche, Italy
Retail price: $22
The Importer: Vinity Wine Company
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Luigi Silvestri's curator insight, December 22, 2012 7:18 AM

Lacrima can only be found in Marche Region.

http://www.accantogroup.com/accantowine

luigi.silvestri@accantogroup.com

Wines and People
The Le Marche region has a lot to offer to wine lovers and gourmets from the prestigious and famous Verdicchio, Lacrima di Morro d'Alba and Vernaccia di Serrapetrona, a first DOCG of the Region, to the Pecorino or Passerina, rediscovered wines that recently hit the headlines. Also the Rosso Conero and Rosso Conero Riserva DOCG wines, two great reds native to the vineyards of just seven municipalities in the Le Marche province of Ancona. The Le Marche where all these wines are found have mountains and hills gently sloping down to the coast, a great terroir, essential for the growth of great wines. In 2012, Le Marche produced 920,000 hl (10.2 million cases) of wine. There are 16 DOC and 5 DOCG wines, these spread throughout the Marche region, thus confirming the high level of quality reached by this wonderful regions wine production. Many of these wines are little known outside of Italy but visitors to the region have a pleasant surprise when they try the local wine produced by many small aziendas and cantinas.
Curated by Mariano Pallottini