Wines and People
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Wines and People
The Le Marche region has a lot to offer to wine lovers. There are 5 DOCG wines and 16 DOC wines. From the prestigious and famous Verdicchio, to the Vernaccia di Serrapetrona, from the Offida Pecorino to the Offida Passerina. Also: Bianchello del Metauro, Colli Maceratesi, Colli Pesaresi, Esino, Falerio dei Colli Ascolani, I Terreni di Sanseverino, Lacrima di Morro d'Alba, Rosso Conero, Pergola, Rosso Piceno, San Ginesio Many of these wines are little known outside of Italy but visitors to the region have a pleasant surprise when they try the local wine produced by many small aziendas and cantinas.
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Le Marche Wine promoted in Australia | The Italian wine star that came back from oblivion

Le Marche Wine promoted in Australia | The Italian wine star that came back from oblivion | Wines and People | Scoop.it

Offida (Italy) (AFP) - It is the rising star of Italian wine, a greeny-gold white starting to earn an international reputation for its distinctive minerally edge and ageing potential.

Yet pecorino, which shares its name with one of Italy's best-known cheeses, might not even exist but for the vision of a trailblazing pioneer fondly remembered by his daughters as being "a little bit crazy".

The late Guido Cocci Griffoni is revered as a hero of Italian viticulture and his native region of Marche for having hauled the ancient grape back from the brink of extinction. [...]

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Le Marche Wine promoted in Australia | The Italian wine star that came back from oblivion

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On The Rise: Wines of the Marche and Abruzzi

On The Rise: Wines of the Marche and Abruzzi | Wines and People | Scoop.it

With its pebble beaches, dramatic valleys, rolling hills and tall mountains, the eastern central coast of Italy is a land of rugged and untamed beauty. At its heart sits the wine regions of Le Marche and Abruzzi, a region that is known as one of the greenest places in Italy.

With more wildlife sanctuaries and conservation land than anywhere else in Europe, much of this region is unkempt wilderness – the literal green heat of the entire Mediterranean. While the heights of the inland Apennine foothills have a much cooler, temperate climate, it’s the coastal areas where one can find the majority of people and vineyards.

These coastal villages and cities have been the home of a unique cuisine and winemaking tradition that dates back millennia, some even predating the founding of Mother Rome! Like many of Europe’s winemaking regions, Le Marche and Abruzzi have seen their fair share of trial and tribulations over the past century. During the Second World War, many of this area’s vines were destroyed by one man’s greed – Benito Mussolini. With dreams of making Le Marche and Abruzzi the center of his new Italy’s industrial power, Mussolini ordered many of this lands vineyards ripped from the soil to make way for factories and cities. Fortunately, much of this grand scheme never came to fruition, and once again Abruzzi and Le Marche are emerging as major players on the international wine scene.[...]

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Tasting Montepulciano

Tasting Montepulciano | Wines and People | Scoop.it

Retrospective on the Montepulciano of Le Marche and Abruzzo, which will give an idea of the vine’s potential.[...]

 

  • Conero Dorico Riserva, 2005, Moroder - Pure Montepulciano. It looks menacing from the start, dark, with purple tones. A monument to these lands’ beauty, it’s concentrated, a potential masterpiece, densely fruity, perfectly fused in powerful tannic weaves that persists until a savory finale. Its fierce tannin requires a Sacrifice of Korean-Barbecue Ribs. It will easily get to twenty years. Score: 90. €20.
  • Conero Vision of J riserva, 2006, Le Terrazze - The house’s first born, which gets only the best vintages—and it shows. Elegant in its deep, fruity notes of sour cherry and blackberry, its spicy wealth and its savory suggestions that come from the sea, a luminous window opened in a dark tannic score. This wine has great personality and consistency, which make it one of the great standards of the area. Its fine bouquet can be accompanied by Game Pies or, even, Turkish Shish Kebabs with a Garlicky Tahini. Score: 91. €25.
  • Kurni, 2008, Oasi degli Angeli - Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony in a bottle. Only six thousand bottles per year make the Kurni a pure temptation, an idea that became substance. This is its greatest quality, to elevate itself above matter and aim for the Absolute. Its appearance is imperturbable like ink, splendid, a whirlpool of red fruit in many forms—fresh, caramelized, in alcohol, in a frappé, in ice cream, in yogurt—but also rose, mulberry, carnation, licorice, iris, aniseed, coffee, cinnamon, tobacco, china root, rhubarb, ginger, myrtle. It’s a surprising fugue of flavors that finds no rest. The magnificence of its taste is amplified by a warm texture, while tannins are under control. Its sweet intensity make it taste almost like a passito, the dream of a sweet-toothed kid. One wonders if such roundness isn’t maybe too much, too frivolous, but this feeling doesn’t last, and becomes fresher, sharper, a statuesque body behind this softness. A wine for meditation, it performs at best with a Castelmagno cheese or Duck with Orange. Score: 95. €80.
  • Regina del Bosco, 2007, Fattoria Dezi - A strong-willed wine, which encompasses all the nuances typical of the vine, the ruby color, the clear fruits and massive character. The sweet concentration of wild strawberries and cocoa turn it into an irresistible syrup. The taste flows boldly. Its warmth is persistent, yet never overwhelming. Pair Roasted Pig with Plums or Canadian Onion Soup. Score 92. €28.
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Le Marche & Abruzzo Wines: Gems from Italy

Le Marche & Abruzzo Wines: Gems from Italy | Wines and People | Scoop.it

I confess to a fondness for the wines and the grapes grown on the Adriatic coast of Italy in the regions of Abruzzo and Marche. A few years ago, I spent a week in the province of Ascoli Piceno, which is the southernmost part of Marche, running along the border with Abruzzo along the old Roman road from Rome, through the mountains and down to the sea. [...]

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Le Marche Wines by Steve Delaney: <<There are quite a variety of interesting reds and whites, including sweets and sparklers in the area.>>

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Clearing Up Confusion with Montepulciano

Clearing Up Confusion with Montepulciano | Wines and People | Scoop.it

Despite the name, the grape called Montepulciano has nothing to do with the town of the same name in Toscana, nor does it have any relationship with the wine Vino Nobile di Montepulciano, which comes from Toscana. Rather, Montepulciano, the grape, is cultivated throughout Central Italy, from Le Marche to Apulia and most specifically in Abruzzo. Montepulciano is a varietal that makes a tremendously pleasing wine characterized by low acidity, manageable tannins, and a combination of the roundness of Merlot with the pepper and black fruit of Syrah. Known best for its DOC appellation Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, this varietal is said to have originated in Abruzzo, but it also appears in several other DOC wines throughout central Italy.
Montepulciano d’Abruzzo DOC, created in 1968, covers more or less the entire eastern half of its titular province. Despite the similarity in name, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo ought not be confused with Toscana’s Vino Nobile de Montepulciano, named for its nearest town, Montepulciano. Indigenous to Abruzzo, Montepulciano grows happily throughout the rugged terrain of central Italy, and the varietal forms the central component of this DOC and that of Le Marche’s Rosso Cònero, as well as serving as a recommended varietal for many others.
This grape possesses an extremely easy-going nature, thriving particularly well around the foothills of the Apennines near the town of Teramo, the site of its DOCG appellation, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo Colline Teramane. Although it suffers the reputation of being a little brother to some of the region’s better known wines, the medium-bodied, ruby-red, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo provides a very pleasant wine for a very good value. Lightly tannic but bouncy with acidity, this wine with a palate of berries and violets also has an intriguing spiciness that complements the region’s predilection for foods laced with hot peppers. The slightly sweet tannins of Montepulciano d’Abruzzo keep it lively in the bottle, but unchanged as it ages. Recent interest in playing with techniques in cultivation and vinification, however, may help make the genial Montepulciano d’Abruzzo become a more complex and burly wine in the future.
Montepulciano d’Abruzzo comes in four types. Vinified like a white with a short maceration on the skins, Cerasuolo is its rosé style, named for its bright cherry-red color. An unusually jaunty rosé, Cerasuolo can stand up to spicy foods; its DOC regulations allow for 85% Montepulciano and up to 15% of other local varietals, often Sangiovese. Montepulciano d’Abruzzo Rosso has the same grape allowances as the Cerasuolo, though it is vinified as a red with a longer maceration; this DOC also comes in a riserva form that requires 24 months of ageing. Montepulciano d’Abruzzo’s Casauria and Terre dei Vestini DOC types both require 100% Montepulciano, and both have riserva forms that require 24 months of ageing.
The best thing about Montepulciano d’Abbruzzo wines–other than their general deliciousness–is that they tend to be super affordable, offering a fresh, easy way to serve quality Italian wines any night of the week.

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Appassionata's curator insight, February 7, 2013 6:45 AM

Intersting article about the Montepulciano grape we are growing.....